Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca
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PLOS Computational Biology: The Roots of Bioinformatics in ISMB

PLOS Computational Biology: The Roots of Bioinformatics in ISMB | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
PLOS Computational Biology is an open-access
Nicolas Palopoli's insight:

Besides the interesting recall of the Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) annual conferences on computational biology, it offers a nice insight into current state-of-the-art methodologies and upcoming trends in the discipline.

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Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca
Virus and bioinformatics articles with some microbiology and immunology thrown in for good measure
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It's a group effort - the curators:

It's a group effort - the curators: | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it

get in touch if you want to help curate this topic

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Bwana Moses's comment, May 25, 2016 6:13 AM
Great work. Keep it going.
Bwana Moses's comment, March 7, 12:46 PM
Thank You.
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HiLive: real-time mapping of illumina reads while sequencing | Bioinformatics | Oxford Academic

HiLive: real-time mapping of illumina reads while sequencing | Bioinformatics | Oxford Academic | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
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Ross River Virus: Many Vectors and Unusual Hosts Make for an Unpredictable Pathogen

Ross River Virus: Many Vectors and Unusual Hosts Make for an Unpredictable Pathogen | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
@GertrudRey #ZIKA Ross River Virus, another MBV, can be transmitted from animals to humans.

https://t.co/1X2HmZO7PP
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The sense behind retroviral anti-sense transcription

Retroviruses are known to rely extensively on the expression of viral proteins from the sense proviral genomic strand. Yet, the production of regulatory retroviral proteins from antisense-encoded viral genes is gaining research attention, due to their clinical significance. This report will discuss what is known about antisense transcription in Retroviridae, and provide new information about antisense transcriptional regulation through a comparison of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Human T-cell Lymphotrophic Virus (HTLV-1) and endogenous retrovirus-K (ERVK) long terminal repeats (LTRs). We will attempt to demonstrate that the potential for antisense transcription is more widespread within retroviruses than has been previously appreciated, with this feature being the rule, rather than the exception.

Via Ed Rybicki
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The blood DNA virome in 8,000 humans

The blood DNA virome in 8,000 humans | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
Author summary Novel sequencing technologies offer insight into the virome in human samples. Here, we identify the viral DNA sequences in blood of over 8,000 individuals undergoing whole genome sequencing. This approach serves to identify 94 viruses; however, many are shown to reflect widespread DNA contamination of commercial reagents or of environmental origin. While this represents a significant limitation to reliably identify novel viruses infecting humans, we could confidently detect sequences and quantify abundance of 19 human viruses in 42% of individuals. Ancestry, sex, and age were important determinants of viral prevalence. This large study calls attention on the challenge of interpreting next generation sequencing data for the identification of novel viruses. However, it serves to categorize the abundance of human DNA viruses using an unbiased technique.
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Dramatic evolution within human genome may have been caused by malaria parasite

Dramatic evolution within human genome may have been caused by malaria parasite | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it

A genetic mutation that protects people from a common form of malaria spread like wildfire in sub-Saharan Africa about 42,000 years ago, according to a new study. Today, it’s nearly impossible to find somebody from this region who doesn’t have it. That makes the mutation one of the swiftest, strongest changes to the human genome yet seen—though it remains a mystery why this particular disease sparked such a dramatic evolutionary response.


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Antigenic and immunosuppressive properties of a trimeric recombinant transmembrane envelope protein gp41 of HIV-1.

Antigenic and immunosuppressive properties of a trimeric recombinant transmembrane envelope protein gp41 of HIV-1. | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
The transmembrane envelope (TM) protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) plays an important role during virus infection inducing the fusio
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Mimivirus: leading the way in the discovery of giant viruses of amoebae : Nature Reviews Microbiology : Nature Research

Mimivirus: leading the way in the discovery of giant viruses of amoebae : Nature Reviews Microbiology : Nature Research | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
The accidental discovery of the giant virus of amoeba — Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV; more commonly known as mimivirus) — in 2003 changed the field of virology. Viruses were previously defined by their submicroscopic size, which probably prevented the search for giant viruses, which are visible by light microscopy. Extended studies of giant viruses of amoebae revealed that they have genetic, proteomic and structural complexities that were not thought to exist among viruses and that are comparable to those of bacteria, archaea and small eukaryotes. The giant virus particles contain mRNA and more than 100 proteins, they have gene repertoires that are broader than those of other viruses and, notably, some encode translation components. The infection cycles of giant viruses of amoebae involve virus entry by amoebal phagocytosis and replication in viral factories. In addition, mimiviruses are infected by virophages, defend against them through the mimivirus virophage resistance element (MIMIVIRE) system and have a unique mobilome. Overall, giant viruses of amoebae, including mimiviruses, marseilleviruses, pandoraviruses, pithoviruses, faustoviruses and molliviruses, challenge the definition and classification of viruses, and have increasingly been detected in humans.


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The blood DNA virome in 8,000 humans

The blood DNA virome in 8,000 humans | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
Author summary Novel sequencing technologies offer insight into the virome in human samples. Here, we identify the viral DNA sequences in blood of over 8,000 individuals undergoing whole genome sequencing. This approach serves to identify 94 viruses; however, many are shown to reflect widespread DNA contamination of commercial reagents or of environmental origin. While this represents a significant limitation to reliably identify novel viruses infecting humans, we could confidently detect sequences and quantify abundance of 19 human viruses in 42% of individuals. Ancestry, sex, and age were important determinants of viral prevalence. This large study calls attention on the challenge of interpreting next generation sequencing data for the identification of novel viruses. However, it serves to categorize the abundance of human DNA viruses using an unbiased technique.
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Discovery of an HIV reservoir marker: A new avenue toward eliminating the virus

Discovery of an HIV reservoir marker: A new avenue toward eliminating the virus | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
French researchers have identified a marker that makes it possible to differentiate 'dormant' HIV-infected cells from healthy cells.
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Interleukin-18 Reduces Blood Glucose and Modulates Plasma Co... : Shock

Background: Dysregulation of glucose metabolism, including hyperglycemia with insulin resistance, is
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Study identifies rare strains of HIV, HTLV and HBV

Study identifies rare strains of HIV, HTLV and HBV | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
Virology Highlights features highlighted articles published in Virology, with posts summarizing the research in the authors’ words.

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Ed Rybicki's curator insight, March 15, 11:09 AM
Valuable stuff: we need to do more of this in more of Africa.
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Protect this house: cytosolic sensing of viruses

Protect this house: cytosolic sensing of viruses | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
The ability to recognize invading viral pathogens and to distinguish their components from those of the host cell is critical to initiate the innate immune response. The efficiency of this detection is an important factor in determining the susceptibility of the cell to viral infection. Innate sensing of viruses is, therefore, an indispensable step in the line of defense for cells and organisms. Recent discoveries have uncovered novel sensors of viral components and hallmarks of infection, as well as mechanisms by which cells discriminate between self and non-self. This review highlights the mechanisms used by cells to detect viral pathogens in the cytosol, and recent advances in the field of cytosolic sensing of viruses.


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node.dating: dating ancestors in phylogenetic trees in R | Bioinformatics | Oxford Academic

node.dating: dating ancestors in phylogenetic trees in R | Bioinformatics | Oxford Academic | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
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The sense behind retroviral anti-sense transcription

Retroviruses are known to rely extensively on the expression of viral proteins from the sense proviral genomic strand. Yet, the production of regulatory retroviral proteins from antisense-encoded viral genes is gaining research attention, due to their clinical significance. This report will discuss what is known about antisense transcription in Retroviridae, and provide new information about antisense transcriptional regulation through a comparison of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Human T-cell Lymphotrophic Virus (HTLV-1) and endogenous retrovirus-K (ERVK) long terminal repeats (LTRs). We will attempt to demonstrate that the potential for antisense transcription is more widespread within retroviruses than has been previously appreciated, with this feature being the rule, rather than the exception.

Via Ed Rybicki
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Modelling Virus and Antibody Dynamics during Dengue Virus Infection Suggests a Role for Antibody in Virus Clearance

Modelling Virus and Antibody Dynamics during Dengue Virus Infection Suggests a Role for Antibody in Virus Clearance | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
Author Summary Dengue is a globally important viral disease. Despite this, there is still much unknown about the immunology, virology and epidemiology of dengue. As for all viral infections, the interaction between virus and immune response is a complex one. Using data collected from patients, we model how the virus replicates in an infected individual and how the human antibody response acts to control that replication. We show that the timing and magnitude of the growth and decline of virus and antibody levels in dengue-infected patients are consistent with antibody playing a key role in controlling infection. Our results are of use in the evaluation of potential antiviral drugs and vaccines.
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Scientists assemble Zika virus mosquito genome from scratch

Scientists assemble Zika virus mosquito genome from scratch | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it

A multi-institutional team has developed a new way to sequence genomes, which can assemble the genome of an organism, entirely from scratch, dramatically cheaper and faster.


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The Next Plague - Viruses: The Superstars Among Pathogenic Plague Microbes | American Council on Science and Health

The Next Plague - Viruses: The Superstars Among Pathogenic Plague Microbes | American Council on Science and Health | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
The Next Plague - Viruses: The Superstars Among Pathogenic Plague Microbes https://t.co/WaSpyzyHuy
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New report shares details about the anti-plagiarism software market 2016 global analysis and forecast to 2020 - WhaTech

Sandler Research, Global Anti-Plagiarism Software Market, Anti-Plagiarism Software Industry, Anti-Plagiarism Software Market Outlook, Anti-Plagiarism Software Market Research, Anti-Plagiarism Software Market Growth, Anti-Plagiarism Software Market...
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Sustained fecal-oral human-to-human transmission following a zoonotic event

Sustained fecal-oral human-to-human transmission following a zoonotic event | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
Bacterial, viral and parasitic zoonotic pathogens that transmit via the fecal-oral route have a major impact on global health. However, the mechanisms underlying the emergence of such pathogens from the animal reservoir and their persistence in the human population are poorly understood. Here, we present a framework of human-to-human transmission of zoonotic pathogens that considers the factors relevant for fecal-oral human-to-human transmission route at the levels of host, pathogen, and environment. We discuss current data gaps and propose future research directions.


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Co-circulation of multiple genotypes of African swine fever viruses among domestic pigs in Zambia (2013-2015). - PubMed - NCBI

Co-circulation of multiple genotypes of African swine fever viruses among domestic pigs in Zambia (2013-2015). - PubMed - NCBI | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
Transbound Emerg Dis. 2017 Mar 15. doi: 10.1111/tbed.12635. [Epub ahead of print]
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GMO - Common Science Space

GMO - Common Science Space | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
It’s a good idea to look critically at any powerful new technology, and the creation of genetically-modified organisms, GMOs, is no exception. Like any new technology, it might have unanticipated, deleterious consequences that outweigh any benefit. Many criticisms of GMO have of course been raised, as a brief interrogation of the internet will show. But unfortunately,... Continue Reading
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PISCES – alignment free RNA-seq quantiation and QC pipeline | RNA-Seq Blog

Matt Shirley -- PISCES: alignment free RNA-seq quantiation and QC pipeline
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Intraspecies transmission of viruses: Human-to-human transmission

Infection of humans by viruses from animal hosts — so-called zoonoses — occur relatively frequently around the world. Examples over the last few decades include human infections caused by avian influenza A viruses of hemagglutinin subtypes H5, H6, H7, H9, and H10, swine influenza A viruses of subtypes H1 and H3, Hendra virus and Nipah virus, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-coronavirus and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)-coronavirus, West-Nile virus, and Ebola virus. Fortunately, most zoonotic infections occur as isolated cases or small clusters, posing little risk to the public at large. However, some zoonotic infections may trigger local or regional outbreaks, spread to humans in various parts of the world, or even result in widespread global outbreaks known as pandemics.


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How to think like a data scientist to become one

How to think like a data scientist to become one | Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca | Scoop.it
We have all read the punchlines – data scientist is the sexiest job, there’s not enough of them and the salaries are very high. The role has been sold so well…
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