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Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca
Virus and bioinformatics articles with some microbiology and immunology thrown in for good measure
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PLOS Pathogens: Membrane Assembly during the Infection Cycle of the Giant Mimivirus

PLOS Pathogens: Membrane Assembly during the Infection Cycle of the Giant Mimivirus | Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca | Scoop.it

With a particle size comparable to that of small bacteria and a 1.2 Mbp double-strand DNA genome that carries more than 1000 open reading frames, the amoeba-infecting Mimivirus, along with other recently identified members of the Mimiviridae family, are the largest and most complex viruses yet identified. The Mimivirus particle includes an internal membrane that underlies an icosahedral capsid. The assembly mechanism of internal membrane during Mimivirus infection remains unclear, as is the case for other viruses containing internal membranes. By using diverse imaging techniques, we showed that membrane biogenesis is an elaborate process that occurs at the periphery of viral factories generated at the host cytoplasm. This multistage process, which includes the formation of open membrane sheets, enables efficient and continuous assembly of multiple Mimivirus progeny. The membrane biogenesis process suggested here provides novel insights into the assembly of internal viral membranes in general.

  
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BMC Genomics | De novo Assembly of highly diverse viral populations

Extensive genetic diversity in viral populations within infected hosts and the divergence of variants from existing reference genomes impede the analysis of deep viral sequencing data.

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Colocalization of Different Influenza Viral RNA Segments in the Cytoplasm before Viral Budding

Colocalization of Different Influenza Viral RNA Segments in the Cytoplasm before Viral Budding | Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca | Scoop.it

Influenza A viruses cause one of the major respiratory infection diseases in humans. The viruses possess a genome consists of eight different RNA segments and the incorporation of all the eight RNA segments is required for the generation of an infectious virus particle. The precise process of how these eight viral RNA segments are co-packaged into progeny virus particles remains undefined due to the limitations of methodology to determine the locations of different vRNA segments in infected cells with single-molecule resolution. In this study, we established an experimental system to examine the localization of different viral RNA segments in an infected cell with high spatial precision. We found that viral RNA belonging to different segments gather together in the cytoplasm which is facilitated by cellular recycling endosomal protein Rab11. Our results supported the idea that eight different viral RNAs likely form a super-complex as they travel to the site for virion incorporation. These findings extend our knowledge on the process of influenza virus genome packaging and suggest a mechanism by which the genome assembly of different viral RNA segments is regulated.

 

Ed Rybicki's insight:

It has always been a bit of a mystery how the 8 different nucleoprotein components of the average influenza A virus come together for assembly - especially, if, as shown here, they assemble and are exported separately from the nucleus.  Yet another example of co-opting of cellular transport and organisation functions for the benefit of a parasite!  Nice use of a sophisticated microscopic technique, too.

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BMC Bioinformatics | Abstract | Mapsembler, targeted and micro assembly of large NGS datasets on a desktop computer

The analysis of next-generation sequencing data from large genomes is a timely research topic. Sequencers are producing billions of short sequence fragments from newly sequenced organisms.
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