Violence in Mexico
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Violence in Mexico
Final Project for Geog 400
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Fault Lines - Mexico: Impunity and profits

Once known as a booming industrial city and a model of economic progress in Mexico, the border city of Juarez has become infamous as the murder capital of th...

 

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This video is just a small glimpse of the violence that is unfolding in just places like Ciudad Juarez, a city just on the other side of the El Paso, Texas border. There are crimes ensuing every day. It is becoming an everyday thing for these people. While there are a few lucky one who manage to escape and leave that town to come to America, many cannot afford that luxury. The ones, who are willing to escape, are not recognized here for the skills they had in Mexico.

 

Many of these people are losing hope and just abandoning full homes in search of somewhere safer. There are areas where full neighborhoods are deserted and are scavenged by looters. Anyone still living in these types of neighborhoods are frequently being robbed.

 

This is not a sane way to live. This is not how it should be. Humanity cannot really believe that life was given to them so they can focus on themselves, and consider everyone else unimportant. Although a whole country cannot be changed in one day, something must be done to stop this kind of violence. Something needs to be done to help the innocent.


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Visa Pour l'Image: Narco Culture in Mexico

Visa Pour l'Image: Narco Culture in Mexico | Violence in Mexico | Scoop.it
Olivier Laurent BJP It's started as an assignment, but, four years later, Shaul Schwarz, a Reportage by Getty Images photographer, has produced a large body of work on the Narco culture in...

 

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While this article is fairly short, there is definitely a lot to say about it. For starters, the police and the government are now looked upon as the bad guys. They are the ones who are being corrupt and bribed. They are the ones not enforcing any laws and letting murderers, rapists, and kidnappers walk around the streets as free as a bird with as much power as they can handle.

Second, the drug lords are now the models and examples of what success looks like. These people, who strike fear into the lives of the citizens and make money by harming and destroying the lives of others, are the new role models in town. They are the new system of getting things done.

 

Lastly, they are not only becoming the new example of fame but are also influencing modern culture. The music that is being produced nowadays is filled with lyrical violence. Art is glorifying it as well. These people are filling the minds of our youth with aggression. This may explain why these cartels are becoming bigger and stronger. Having these thoughts, images, words, and songs around throughout a child’s whole life certainly influences them. They will grow up always thinking that this is how it has to be. It’s like teaching a child that blue is red.

 

Once it is engraved deep in their minds, unless there is a catastrophic epiphany of some sort, these children will grow up into adults, and eventually die “knowing” that THIS is the right way and anything else is wrong/.

 


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Harrowing moment Mexico's fearless woman mayor begged for her little girl's life before she was abducted by drug gang, tortured and executed

Harrowing moment Mexico's fearless woman mayor begged for her little girl's life before she was abducted by drug gang, tortured and executed | Violence in Mexico | Scoop.it
Maria Santos Gorrostieta, who had already survived two assassination attempts, was driving the child to school at around 8.30am when she was ambushed by a car in the city of Morelia.

 

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This article shows that not even government officials are safe in Mexico. Mayor Maria Santos Gorrostieta , was kidnapped, stabbed, beaten, and set on fire for defying a powerful drug gang. Mayor Maria was driving her daughter to school when she was abruptly ambushed and physically assaulted. She begged for her daughter not to be harmed and willingly got into the assailants’ car, while horrified onlookers witnessed it all.

 

She was found eight days later dumped on the roadside in a small town. Gorrostieta had previously survived two other failed attempts on her life, one in which her first husband was with her and did not survive. These vicious drug cartels kept coming after her because she would not step down from her place as mayor. She was setting an example for her children as some who would stand up for the people, for the good that their town needed.

 

This is a very courageous woman, who some may deem as dumb because of the fear that has been instilled on them. But who is lifted up today, for doing what is right. This is the type of person that everyone should be willing to be. To once again reference the video seen in class, all it takes is one person to inspire a town, to inspire a nation to fight back and to take their freedom of hope and security back.

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The Challenge of Mexico’s Next President: The Corruption at the Heart of Crime | TIME.com

The Challenge of Mexico’s Next President: The Corruption at the Heart of Crime | TIME.com | Violence in Mexico | Scoop.it
Enrique Peña Nieto has issued several proposals about battling the plague of narcoterrorism.

 

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Pena Nieto is the new president of Mexico. He promises to stop the violence in Mexico and take away the power from the drug cartel and give it back to the state. Many debate his stand though. His party the PRI, the Institutional Revolutionary Party, was once the most corrupt party of them all.

 

While he states that the party’s old ways are just that, old ways that are no more, many believe that he is going to be the new corrupt face of the nation. He promises hope but the citizens fear he will bring even more fear. He is looking into legalizing some drugs to keep profits out of the hands of the cartels, but will that really make things better? Having drug abusers running through the streets and showing children that it is okay to do such a thing?

 

So my two cents:

 

What will the cartels do to keep their power if this is really to happen?

 

1. Sell it openly and earn their profit that way is my best guess. Not having to hide the fact that they are selling the drugs, will give them more of a chance to openly sell as much as they want without any consequences.

 

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2. If the cartels become angry with this, well they are already known for kidnapping, so there’s another thing they can do. Just kidnap and kill more people. With more open drug abusers roaming the streets it may become easier to do so because everyone will be so high, they won’t really understand what is going on.

 

While he states that he does not support legalizing some drugs, this may be the new way in the years to come.

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The Tools of Mexico’s Drug Cartels, From Landmines to Monster Trucks | Danger Room | Wired.com

The Tools of Mexico’s Drug Cartels, From Landmines to Monster Trucks | Danger Room | Wired.com | Violence in Mexico | Scoop.it

It can be a little deceiving to think of Mexico's drug cartels as simply gangsters. Instead, they've blurred the distinctions between organized crime and quasi-military insurgents, with plenty of firepower to back it up.

 

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This article briefly describes, once again, the major threat that is the Zeta Cartel. Having become Mexico’s leading drug cartel, they have brought with them ex-military soldiers, guns, and mass violence. This cartel, as well as, the Sinaloa and the Gulf Cartel all have an extensive amount of fire power. The amount of weapons these cartels have, almost matches that of the Mexican military.

 

The types of weapons can range from AK-47’s to grenades to landmines and monster trucks. These cartels are packing some very heavy artillery, which is mostly coming from the US. So the question on my mind is, while they are the ones doing the destruction in Mexico, aren’t we technically supporting it? Even if they may be somehow getting these weapons illegally, are we considered somewhat to blame?

 

I ask these questions because we in the US tend to blame our drug trafficking problem to Mexico for supplying/ bringing in the illegal drug into the US. So if they are responsible for our drug problem, are we responsible for their violence problem? Is this just a never ending circle supporting bad decisions between the two countries?


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Mexico's drug war: a poet and the people fight back - Telegraph

Mexico's drug war: a poet and the people fight back - Telegraph | Violence in Mexico | Scoop.it

The death of the son of a Mexican poet has galvanised a peace movement that is pressurising the government to take action over the 80,000 killed or ‘disappeared’ since 2006...

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This article shows one example of how the people are starting to fight back against the violence in Mexico. The best part about this is that it is not physical force that they are using, it is their voice. They are not using guns against guns, or fists against fists. They are using their power as citizens of this country to band together for a common cause.

 

Like the video we watched in class, one small person cannot move the fallen tree, that is the violence whether it be drug or gang related in Mexico, but a group of people together can, they may not completely change the entire nation, but they can slowly but surely change the minds of other around them to bring peace and a sense of security to their people. All it takes is one person to stand up for what they believe in.


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Waves of violence

Waves of violence | Violence in Mexico | Scoop.it
An interactive guide to drug crime in Mexico Drugs in Mexico Related deaths2012 (to date)2011Cartel areasTraffic routes Sources: Reforma; Justice in Mexico Project...

 

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These maps show the changes in violence through the country of Mexico. While most states seem to be stabilizing, the closer one gets to the border, the greater the violence. Places like Chihuahua, Sinaloa, and Nuevo Leon are extremely dangerous nowadays, not to say that Mexico itself is a safe place to be either way.

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Mexico Sends Message to the United States: No More Weapons!

Mexico Sends Message to the United States: No More Weapons! | Violence in Mexico | Scoop.it
Just a few steps south of the U.S.-Mexico border, President Calderón unveiled a towering billboard last week wielding a message written in plain English.

 

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Maybe I was right. Maybe it is partly our fault. As this article tells us, even the ex-president of Mexico, Felipe Calderon, is placing some of the blame on the US. While, yes, it is the drug cartels that are causing this outbreak of violence in the country, we, the US, are the ones supplying the firearms.

 

In February of this year, President Calderon unveiled a massive billboard on the border of the US pleading the US government to regulate and pass more laws against gun trafficking between the borders. According to and ATF agent, the consequences for such an act are as minor as a traffic violation.

 

This article also mentions the poet, whose son was murdered. He said something, that I feel is, very wise. He stated, “I know the U.S. has a culture of arms... but behind each and every one of your weapons are our dead -- and that's a grave responsibility."

He is absolutely right. Every gun that we sell across the border amounts to at least one of their people killed. Is that something that Americans can really live with? Knowing that the products that we are selling overseas are not being used as protection, per say, but for the act of harming others?

 

This, I feel, is like giving a child a sharp knife and expecting that child not to hurt himself or someone around them.

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Alarma! Mexico’s Most Violent Crimes

Alarma! Mexico’s Most Violent Crimes | Violence in Mexico | Scoop.it

It is very rare to have nothing going on in Mexico City. Since it’s such a big city, there’s always something happening. For one reason or another, there’s always a homicide. There is not one day without a one. Alarma! magazine catalogs crime and violence in Mexico City, a town where a cop is killed almost everyday.
From the employees: We know we have to be very cautious about whether or not we can do our work. The first thing we have to deal with is the cops. If they’ve already taped off the crime scene, then we have to be creative about taking our photographs.
Basically, we publish violent events from around the country… all over Mexico. I think of Alarma! as a catalog of “the bad.” If you steal you’ll be in Alarma! If you get involved with the narcos, you’ll get killed and be in Alarma! If you drink and drive, crash and then die, you’ll be in Alarma! That’s what the magazine is about.
Watch the full documentary now (playlist – 54 minutes)
Warning: Contains scenes which some viewers may find disturbing

 

 

 

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First thing’s first. This was probably that worst video to watch knowing that I am going to Mexico soon.

 

Now, onto the video. This video portrays the violence in Mexico’s capital Mexico City. The man speaking in this documentary states that the ALARMA! Magazine, which comes out every Monday, portrays the crimes that have occurred during the week. This magazine has very graphic images of what takes place in Mexico City. It shows photos and shares stories of people who are cut open, beheaded, shot, hung, you name it.

 

There is at least one homicide committed everyday according to him. They may occur for many reasons. Whether it is due to narcotics, theft ...etc. there is always crime to be reported every week. If this man’s calculations are correct, there are at least 365 homicides committed every year, which may not seem like a lot but according to him that is just a minimum number.

 

This is very sad to see. While the magazine is a good way to inform the people of what is going on and why these murders, suicides and such are happening, it is scary and sorrowful to know that every day, in that one city, all of this is happening. To live in a place with so much of this going on, would probably have me living in fear. I would likely end up with agoraphobia. But, to the people who have lived with this every day of their lives since they were children, this is something exciting. The day that there is nothing going on, there will probably be a case of hysteria and paranoia that something bigger and worse will happen.


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Zetas Mexico's 'biggest cartel'

Zetas Mexico's 'biggest cartel' | Violence in Mexico | Scoop.it
The Zetas are now the largest cartel in Mexico, overtaking their bitter rival, the Sinaloa cartel, a report by US security firm Stratfor suggests. 

 

When the Sinaloa cartel was the 'big dog,' they had a tacit understanding with the government and the government would target other drug syndicates and basically leave the important members of 'La Federacion' alone.  The Sinaloans operate primarily through bribery and corruption while the Zetas specialize in horrific brutality.  Now that the Zetas have muscled their way into more turf and more influential networks, how will that reshape the geopolitical paradigm?  What with the effect be for Mexican citizens and for those on both sides of the border?   This is not a good turn of events.

 

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The Sinaloa Cartel may have been famous for bribing the government into turning away and “not seeing” the crimes that were being committed, but the Zetas, who are now the largest and most influential drug cartel in Mexico, use brutal violence as a means of getting what they want.

 

Money and corruption may no longer be in play. Instead fear has struck the streets. With weapons and the strength of their own hands the Zetas have climbed their way to the top of the Mexican food chain. With ex-special operations soldiers on their side, they developed a method of getting things done that is almost fool-proof.

 

Fear is something that can move mountains. It persuades people into doing extreme things to be able to stay alive. With fear on their side the Zetas have a great advantage over the Sinaloa Cartel.


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James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:21 PM

(Mexico topic 5)

It seems to me that as Mexico's economy evolves, so do its drug cartels. Just as businesses expand and take monopoly over smaller ones, it looks like the same process is occurring with cartels. My educated guess would be that this is not just a coincidence, but rather the two are strongly correlated and interconnected. Though I  am not an expect on the topic and there is surely much to be researched, I believe that advances in infrastructure such as the Internet, telecom, and freeways (to name just a few) benefit both the legal economy and illegal cartels by being utilized and exploited in the same manner.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 1, 2015 7:16 PM

I've often wondered why the government can't get things under control in Mexico.  These cartels are awful!  Mexico will never get better till the Zetas are put out of operation.  Its also come down to supply and demand.  Until we stop demanding drugs then I guess they will keep supplying them to the US.  Legalizing pot has to put some sort of crimp into the supply/demand of it in the US.  I wonder what the dollar amount is?  The news out of Mexico about the brutality of the cartels scares me into not visiting Mexico.  It has to have some impact on tourism.  

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 6:14 PM

After reading the article and learning that just one cartel alone runs in more than half of Mexico is astounding. For one cartel to place it's mark like that must mean something bad in this case. They also seem to be much more brutal because the article says that violence gives them advantage over a rival gang Sinaloa who uses bribery. That is probably how they gained so much advantage over others. They probably get their violence because they are mostly ex- spec ops soldiers. With expansion into South America, middlemen are eliminated, which in turn makes more profit for the two prominent cartels. Also, because of our stepping up on border enforcement, the cartels have expanded to overseas where the market is more open. 

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Drug wars in Mexico - in pictures

Drug wars in Mexico - in pictures | Violence in Mexico | Scoop.it
Mexican president Felipe Calderon has stepped down, six years after launching a crackdown on his country's drug cartels in December 2006.

 

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These are photographs of many different situations that have passed since President Felipe Calderon issued his was on drugs. These images show arrests of drug lords and cartel members, drugs and weapons that were seized, and also graphic deaths of various people including criminals, innocent bystanders, and also people who were fighting for a more peaceful Mexico.

 

These photos bring to light that this drug gang violence is not something taken lightly in Mexico. There are innocent people being murdered for standing up to a good cause. The article tells how since 2006, when the war on drugs was initiated, over 50,000 people have been killed.

 

It saddens me to think that this kind of violence is a normal thing for people in different nations. I know my boyfriend, who lived in Mexico most of his life, knows that there is a problem but doesn’t consider it too big. He is so used to hearing about this kind of violence that he is not worried about going to visit Mexico, because he’s lived through that


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