Vintage Living Today For A Future Tomorrow
715 views | +0 today
Follow
Vintage Living Today For A Future Tomorrow
It's as easy to romanticize the past as it is to demonize it; instead, let's learn from it. More than living simply, more than living 'green', thrifty grandmas knew the importance of the 'economics' in Home Economics. The history of home ec, lessons in thrift, practical tips and ideas from the past focused on sustainability for families and out planet. Companion to http://www.thingsyourgrandmotherknew.com/
Curated by Deanna Dahlsad
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deanna Dahlsad
Scoop.it!

Upcycle vintage books with succulents

Upcycle vintage books with succulents | Vintage Living Today For A Future Tomorrow | Scoop.it
Upcycle vintage books with succulents
Deanna Dahlsad's insight:

As book lovers, do we love or hate this? I say "love" because so many old books are just dumped in landfills, so recycling them seems a better option.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Strange days indeed...
Scoop.it!

This Garden In A Bottle Has Been Thriving Since 1960: Sealed in its own ecosystem and watered just once in 53 years

This Garden In A Bottle Has Been Thriving Since 1960: Sealed in its own ecosystem and watered just once in 53 years | Vintage Living Today For A Future Tomorrow | Scoop.it
The Daily Mail has a fascinating feature on David Latimer and his soon to be 54-year-old bottle garden that he started on… (This Garden In A Bottle Has Been Thriving Since 1960: Sealed in its own ecosystem and watered just once in 53 years

Via F. Thunus
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deanna Dahlsad
Scoop.it!

DIY Tea Tin Herbs

DIY Tea Tin Herbs | Vintage Living Today For A Future Tomorrow | Scoop.it

I love cooking for family and friends, and as all the pros will tell you, food always tastes more flavourful when it's made with fresh herbs. This quick, kid-friendly project lets you get a head start growing an herb garden before summer comes and will afford the luxury of fresh ingredients year-round. And after a long winter, I'm starved for spring greenery, and these pretty tea tins, brimming with plant life, add welcome colour to a windowsill or kitchen shelf.

Deanna Dahlsad's insight:

A great idea of recycling tins; even vintage rusted ones (in condidtions too bad to be desireable collectibles) can be used to add good taste and charm to your home.

more...
Bek Atkins's curator insight, March 7, 2013 6:52 AM

This is an easy project that students of all abilities can achieve. This activity would develop skills in line with statements in the Australian National Curriculum: science - biological science for years F- 2. [(ACSSU002), (ACSSU017), (ACSSU211) and (ACSSU030).] These statements call for students to observe the biological processes of a variety of different organisms. The positive point for using plants is that if they are roughly treated or neglected the consequences are less traumatic then if it was a guinea pig. 

 

This activity would also translate to Home Economics where students could use their herbs to create nutritional meals. Special needs students (and in fact all young children) can be very picky about their food, especially if it is green! By growing, nurturing and then using their own produce, students have ownership and this may make students more likely to try and like the foods. 

 

Through the teaching of Home Economics skills students can begin to acquire the necessary life skills to become independent. 

Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from animals and prosocial capacities
Scoop.it!

Scientists race to save 'genomic books' in the burning 'library of life'

Scientists race to save 'genomic books' in the burning 'library of life' | Vintage Living Today For A Future Tomorrow | Scoop.it

Researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) have developed a cost-effective way to save a wide range of threatened species, including rare old ones that may be costly to protect. Their new technique to help maximise both the species and genetic diversity we save helps resolve the dilemma facing conservation managers worldwide: whether to rescue a larger number of recent and more common species or fewer, unique and older species that may be more costly to preserve.


The technology will help nations such as Australia and New Zealand to protect as much diversity of both species and their genes as possible, says lead researcher Dr Joseph Bennett of CEED and The University of Queensland (UQ). "The global extinction crisis is getting worse, and conservation funds are seldom enough to stop biodiversity from declining," says Dr Bennett. "This is like a library on fire – and we have to save as much of the precious information as we can.


"If we have to choose, do we carry out a few rare, old tomes, or do we carry a larger number of smaller books that may contain less information than the ancient tomes?" Dr Bennett explains that highly distinct species have few close relatives, and their lineage has been isolated on the tree of life for many millions of years. The platypus is one example of Australia's 'rare old tomes' – its ancestors diverged from other mammals somewhere between 160 and 200 million years ago.


As the distinct species are isolated from others, they also contain unique genes, which may in the future prove very important to the health of ecosystems, or even the development of medicine. For example, Ginkgo biloba is an old and genetically distinct species that was once close to extinction, but is now used traditional medicine, he says.


"So losing the more distinct species – akin to losing the rare old tome – could mean the loss of this genetic information, along with millions of years of evolution," he says. "But when these species are expensive to protect, it may mean spending money to save one or two species instead of five or ten other species."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Jocelyn Stoller
more...
Venkatesh Iyer (venkyiyer.com)'s curator insight, December 31, 2014 2:57 AM

The amount of ebooks being produced, we will soon have to take up the same exercise with real books in the real libraries of life

Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Sustainable Solutions for the Developing World
Scoop.it!

Book Review : Small Green Roofs - The Metropolitan Field Guide

Book Review : Small Green Roofs - The Metropolitan Field Guide | Vintage Living Today For A Future Tomorrow | Scoop.it

 Full of information about small green roofs, their construction and biodiversity and plants, over half is devoted to 40 case studies. The book is full of inspiring and beautiful images of a wide variety of green roofs on all manner of buildings and structures. Written for homeowners, architects, landscape architects or ecologists, it’s a valuable resource on a practical level that serves as an excellent companion to the many other green roof books on the market, while at the same time offering a completely unique approach to the way green roofs have been previously written about.


Via Toitsverts Biodivers / Livingroofs, Jocelyn Stoller
more...
Toitsverts Biodivers / Livingroofs's curator insight, April 27, 2014 1:31 PM

An essential one if you don't know it yet !

Rescooped by Deanna Dahlsad from Wholesome Food Association
Scoop.it!

Comfrey: How to Use

Comfrey: How to Use | Vintage Living Today For A Future Tomorrow | Scoop.it
Learn about how to grow comfrey and make it into a wonderful free fertilizer or healing poultice.

Via Tess Marshall
more...
Marty Roddy's curator insight, February 26, 2014 9:42 PM

I have been a comfrey fan for 2-3 years now.