Vintage & images
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Vintage & images
A compilation of magazine covers, ad poster, propagande, movies poster, etc
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Gerald Gregg | Pulp artist

Gerald Gregg | Pulp artist | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Born January 25, 1907 in Lamar, Colorado, Gregg attended Racine High School in Wisconsin until 1925, when he won second prize in a poster designing contest and was advised to go to art school. He graduated from the Layton School of Art in Milwaukee in 1928, but found it difficult to get work at that time. He began accepting freelance assignments, including several from the Western Printing & Lithographing Company in Racine. In 1935, when one of Western’s staff artists took a temporary leave of absence, Gregg was hired as his replacement. Russell Stone, Western’s art director, liked Gregg’s work and offered him a regular position.


In 1943, new art director Bill Strohmer and his assistant, George Frederiksen assigned Gregg to do covers for Dell paperbacks. Strohmer or Frederiksen would generally provide colour sketches which Gregg either fleshed out or adapted. He often used Western’s secretaries and stenographers as models for the beautiful women on his covers. Of the 176 covers he produced for Western Gregg’s own favourites include Dell 115 (The Broken Vase) and Dell 229 (Candidate for Love).
Also during his tenure at Western, Gregg drew Disney and Warner Brothers comic strips and all back covers for the Little Golden Books series.


He worked with an airbrush, and it was his extraordinary technique with that apparatus which made the Dell covers of the 1940s unique. He describes his own style as a combination of graphic design and stylized realism. In addition to his airbrush work, he also produced covers in oils and watercolours, with pen-and-ink and with photography.

 

Photo report's insight:

Original paintings by Gregg now (ie, 1980) sell for $1,000.

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Rico Tomaso | Pulp artist

Rico Tomaso | Pulp artist | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Rico Tomaso – one of the best of the many great artists who worked for men’s adventure magazines…

I think the paintings in that series rank among the best works that Tomaso created during his long long career.

When he did them, World War II was still underway and the men’s adventure magazine genre had not quite taken shape, thoughTRUE was leading the way.

The first painting Tomaso created for TRUE in the final years of WWII was for the February 1944 issue. It shows a group of American troops making a beach landing. (It’s not the D-Day landing. That was still four months in the future.)

The second in the series appeared on the March 1944 issue.

It’s Tomaso’s portrait of American flying ace and Navy Cross recipient Lt. Vernon E. Graham.

 

The original cover painting for that issue, shown below, is now owned by collector Tim Isaacson, who happens to one of the Men's Adventure Mag FB group members.

Tim was gracious enough to send me a photo of it, and a scan of the cover.

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British propaganda during World War II

British propaganda during World War II | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

This section depicts the mixture of serious and humorous images used to get the message across about civilian participation throughout the war. The government was interested in promoting the crucial participation of all civilians at all levels throughout the war.


Looking for voluntary co-operation where possible, rather than enforcement through legislation, propaganda campaigns focused on many different areas of life. This section depicts the mixture of serious and humorous images used to get the message across in a variety of fields, including health, safety, efficiency and recruitment.


Posters were widely used in the propaganda campaigns. Their content ranged from simple instructions to purely motivational content. One series of posters for London Transport featured Billy Brown of London Town.

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Nazi propaganda | 1933-1939

Nazi propaganda | 1933-1939 | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Before World War II, Nazi propaganda strategy, officially promulgated by the Ministry of Public Enlightenment and Propaganda, stressed several themes. Their goals were to establish external enemies and internal enemies, such as Jews, Romani, homosexuals, Bolsheviks and topics like degenerate art. Hitler and Nazi propagandists played on the anti-Semitism and resentment present in Germany. The Jews were blamed for things such as robbing the German people of their hard work while themselves avoiding physical labour. Der Stürmer, a Nazi propaganda newspaper, told Germans that Jews kidnapped small children before Passover because "Jews need the blood of a Christian child, maybe, to mix in with their Matzah." Posters, films, cartoons, and fliers were seen throughout Germany which attacked the Jewish community, such as the 1940 film The Eternal Jew.

 

Soon after the takeover of power in 1933, concentration camps were established for political opponents. The first people that were sent to the camps were Communists. They were sent because of their ties with the Soviet Union and because Nazism greatly opposed Communism. In 1935, anti-semitic laws in Nazi Germany were introduced known as the Nuremberg Laws, the laws forbid non-Aryans and political opponents of the Nazis from the civil-service and any sexual relations and marriage between people classified as "Aryan" and "non-Aryan" (Jews, Gypsies, blacks). The Nuremberg Laws were based on racial purity, they sought to preserve the Aryan race who were at the top of the Nazi racial hierarchy and were said to be the ubermenschen "herrenvolk" (master race), and to teach the German nation to view the Jews as subhumans.

 

A major political and ideological cornerstone of Nazi policy was the unification of all ethnic Germans living outside of the Reich's borders under one Greater Germany (e.g. Austria and Czechoslovakia). In Mein Kampf, Hitler made a direct remark to those outside of Germany. He stated that pain and misery were being forced upon ethnic Germans outside of Germany, and that they dream of common fatherland. He finished by stating they needed to fight for one's nationality. Throughout Mein Kampf, he pushed Germans worldwide to make the struggle for political power and independence their main focus. Nazi propaganda used the Heim ins Reich policy for this, which began in 1938.

 

Nazi propaganda efforts then focused on creating external enemies. Propagandists strengthened the negative attitude of Germany towards the Treaty of Versailles by territorial claims and ethnocentrism. When the Treaty was signed in 1919 non-propagandists newspapers headlines across the nation spoke German's feelings, such as "UNACCEPTABLE" which appeared on the front page of the Frankfurter Zeitung in 1919. The Berliner Tageblatt, also in 1919, predicted "Should we accept the conditions, a military furore for revenge will sound in Germany within a few years, a militant nationalism will engulf all." Hitler, knowing his nation's disgust with the Treaty, used it as leverage to influence his audience. He would repeatedly refer back to the terms of the Treaty as a direct attack on Germany and its people. In one speech delivered on January 30, 1937 he directly stated that he was withdrawing the German signature from the document to protest the outrageous proportions of the terms. He claimed the Treaty made Germany out to be inferior and "less" of a country than others only because blame for the war was placed on it. The success of Nazi propagandists and Hitler won the Nazi party control of Germany and eventually led to World War II.

Photo report's insight:

This is a collection of Nazi posters from 1933-39. Posters from 1939-1945 are on another page. Many are taken from photographs made by Dr. Robert D. Brooks at the German Federal Archives.

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Mort Künstler | Illustrator

Mort Künstler | Illustrator | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Mort Künstler (born 1931) is a historical artist in the United States of America whose work now focuses mainly on the American Civil War. Before he turned to the Civil War in the early 1980s, he had built a body of work that dealt with America's national story: from portraits of prehistoric American life to the odyssey of the space shuttle. His work has been published in illustrated books and magazines, and used by advertising agencies.


Künstler studied art at Brooklyn College, U.C.L.A. and Pratt Institute. After graduating, he worked as a freelance artist in New York, where he received assignments from book and magazine publishers. In 1953, he supplied painted covers for several Classics Illustrated titles, including Pitcairn's Island and A Study in Scarlet.

 

He drew covers and other art for paperback books and men's adventuremagazines. Künstler completed at least three cover illustrations and two inside illustrations every month, for MagazineManagement alone. It's the main reason he used pen names such as Martin Kay and Emmett Kaye.

 

"The editors didn't want it to look like one person was doing all the art." He also did art for Aurora model kit boxes, such as the Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima kit. He used the alias "Mutz" to draw back covers for issues of Mad Magazine, and did posters for movies such as The Poseidon Adventure and The Taking of Pelham One Two Three.

In the early 1970s, Mr. Künstler's paintings began attracting the attention of serious art collectors. At first the interest was mainly in his Western subject matter, but after a major museum retrospective exhibition and a one-man show at the Hammer Galleries in New York City, he became known as an important painter of historic subjects. Mr. Künstler’s fifteenth one-man show at Hammer Galleries was in 2006.


Photo report's insight:

More information : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mort_K%C3%BCnstler

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Pulp artist | Walter Baumhofer, king of the pulps

Pulp artist | Walter Baumhofer, king of the pulps | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Baumhofer remains best known as the King of the Pulps, but his long legacy reaches far beyond that moniker. Blessed with a long and fluid career, Baumhofer was one of the few artists who successfully bounced from the pulps to the slicks, thanks in large part to his exceptional skill as an artist. He could capture a pretty girl in a handsome man's arms as easily as he could grab readers with a pulp monster threatening the world.


He started at Adventure magazine, doing story interiors when fellow artist, H Winfield Scott, told him he'd make a more money with color covers. Baumhofer liked the paycheck covers offered and, because of his talent, he was soon churning out crime, western, and thriller paintings. Some 550 pulp covers grace his resume, including Detective Tales, Fire Fighters, Wild West Weekly, Ace High, Gangland, Gangland Stories, Danger Trail, Western Story, The Spider, Spy Stories, Dime Mystery, Dime Detective, and of course, Adventure.

Baumhofer also did the first Doc Savage covers (an art director told Baumhofer that Savage was "a Man of Bronze -- known as Doc, who looks very much like Clark Gable. He is so well built that the impression is not of size, but of power"; Baumhofer got most of this impeccably, though his Savage does not look like Gable. In fact, he has an uncanny resemblance to Baumhofer's other serial hero, the cowboy, Pete Rice.

 

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Fantastic Novels | Pulp Covers

Fantastic Novels | Pulp Covers | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Fantastic Novels, later Fantastic Novels Magazine, was an American science fiction and fantasy fiction magazine that was published between 1940 and 1951. It was launched by the Frank A. Munsey Company in July 1940 which published it until April 1941. It was taken over by New Publications of Chicago in March 1948 where it remained until its final issue in June 1951.

Its purpose was to feature longer stories, making pulp-staple serials unnecessary, and its premiere edition featured Austin Hall's The Blind Spot, all 138 pages. It also helped introduce older works to younger readers featuring stories by such authors as H.P. Lovecraft, A. Merritt, and Ray Cummings. After World War II broke out, and paper ran short, Fantastic Novels made their sacrifice by suspending publication. When the war ended and operations resumed, the often-requested A. Merritt classic the Ship of Ishtar made its appearance between the covers of Fantastic Novels in March 1948.

 

 

Photo report's insight:

Fantastic Novels had some of the most memorable covers of pulp magazines including covers by Virgil Finlay and Norman Saunders.

Finlay and Lawrence Sterne Stevens offered portfolios of work for sale through the magazine as a regular feature and are still sought after by many collectors.

Lawrence Sterne Stevens created the cover for A. Merritt's The Ship of Ishtar featuring a scantily clad, fainting woman in front of a classic ship. Virgil Finlay also illustrated Merrit's work combining the "exotic and erotic" to readers' delight.

 

Max Brand's 1929 That Receding Brow was offered in the March 1950 edition with an illustration by Finlay featuring a neanderthal looking ape man tossing an explorer through the jungle.

Dr. John Ulrich Giesy's lost race epic, where the teleported hero, Jason Croft, accomplished feats on Palos while his body remained behind on Earth was popular with readers. Giesy's serial Jason, Son of Jason was reprinted in the May 1948 issue.

H.P. Lovecraft's The Cats of Ulthar was included in the January 1951 edition with the catchphrase "They were bred from ancient Egypt's fierce godhead--and had not forgotten the taste of sacrificial blood.

Elmer Brown Mason authored "Lost--One Mylodon" which appeared in July 1950. One of Mother's Nature's earliest mistakes is loose in Patagonia.

 

A. Merritt's Dwellers in the Mirage was first printed in Argosy, but the editor disliked the depressing ending so much that he rewrote it. Fantstic Novels republished it a decade later with the original ending in April 1941.

Eric North, the pen name of Bernard Cronin offered an unpublished story to Fantastic Novels with "Three Against the Stars" published in May 1950,a story about spontaneous life forms.

Donald A. Wollheim contributed "Mimic" to the September 1950 issue with accompanying art featuring a preying mantis and a dead insect man.

Arthur Leo Zagat's "Drink We Deep" was the featured cover story of the January 1951 issue with a cover sporting little green men manipulating gauges and hoses in an underground cavern where a sleeping woman lay.

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Pulp artist | Mel Crair

Pulp artist | Mel Crair | Vintage & images | Scoop.it
Mel Crair, evil Nazis, crawling death and man killing nymphos...

Bondage and torture cover art and stories are fairly common features of some vintage men’s adventure magazines.

The most notorious and most sought after are the Nazi B&T covers — showing Nazis tormenting scantily-clad women or male POWs, often using fiendishly-creative forms of torture.

 

We’ll start with some wild Nazi cover art by artist Mel Crair (1923-2007).

As noted in the best online bio of Crair, on David Saunders’ great Pulp Artists site, he started out doing magazine covers for some of the last of the all-fiction pulp magazines, especially Western pulps. He also painted paperback covers, movie posters and illustrations for mainstream magazines. But Crair is probably best known for the hundreds of terrific men’s adventure cover and interior paintings he created from the late 1950s to the mid-1970s.

The original Crair painting shown at the top of this post was used on the cover of the May 1966 issue of Man’s Epic. It’s for the titillating story“SHACKLED NUDES OF THE MONSTER GENERAL.”

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Artist Interrupted | Illustrator: Kay Nielsen -

Artist Interrupted | Illustrator: Kay Nielsen - | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Kay (pronounced “kigh”) Rasmus Nielsen (1886-1957) was born in Copenhagen into an artistic family. His mother, Oda Nielsen, was one of the most celebrated actresses of her time, both at the Royal Danish Theater and at the Dagmarteater, where his father was Director.

 

Kay Nielsen studied art in Paris before moving to England in 1911. His first commission was from Hodder and Stoughton in 1913.  The work was ‘In Powder and Crinoline’, a selection of fairy tales by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, later published in America as ‘The Twelve Dancing Princesses’.

 

The colour images for ‘In Powder and Crinoline’ – and those of ‘East of the Sun and West of the Moon : Old Tales from the North’ a year later – were reproduced by a 4 colour process, instead of the usual 3 used by the other illustrators at the time. The books he illustrated were also distinct from those of his contemporaries. Where Rackham and Dulac chose 19th Century classics, Nielsen chose works that he could make his own. Few artists have attempted a different version of ‘In Powder and Crinoline’...

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Pulp Artist | Normand B. Saunders

Pulp Artist | Normand B. Saunders | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Normand Blaine Saunders was born January 1, 1907 in the northernmost wilderness of Minnesota. His 35 year-old father, Clare, was a war veteran and his 18 year-old mother, Elvira, was one quarter Iroquois Indian. Norm's younger brother Duane was born in 1913.

At age three Norm's right eye was severely burned by accident with a red-hot fireplace poker, resulting in six months of complete blindness. After his sight was restored by several operations at a charity hospital in Minneapolis, Norm acquired a passionate lifelong habit of sketching his observations of life.

After graduating high school, Norm was trained in art by correspondence courses with The Federal Schools Inc. of Minneapolis. Along with his diploma in 1927, Norm also received a scholarship to the Chicago Art Institute, which he soon forfeited when offered a full-time job on the art staff at Fawcett Publications in Robbinsdale, MN. Norm worked there for six years along with future pulp artists Allen Anderson,Ralph Carlson, George Rozen, and Carl Buettner...

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Pulp artist | George Rozen

Pulp artist | George Rozen | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

GEORGE ROZEN

(1895-1973)

eorge Rozen was a pulp magazine artist who is best known for his dynamic "poster-art" style paintings that graced many of The Shadow Magazine covers. Several of his covers were later featured on various Shadow Comics, also published by Street & Smith.

George's twin brother, Jerome George Rozen, worked on The Shadow Magazine too. He contributed a handful of covers in 1931, and George took over in January of 1932 when Jerome was injured in an automobile accident.

George continued painting his realistic portraits of The Shadow until he was fired. Eventually, he was rehired once again and illustrated a few more covers for the magazine in 1949, before the series was canceled that summer.

 (...)

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Pulps and Fidel Castro’s Cuba

Pulps and Fidel Castro’s Cuba | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Men’s adventure magazines loved to target Fidel Castro’s Cuba, bombarding our isolated neighbor through extreme covers and stories. Ironically enough, prior to Castro’s victory in 1959, many ran stories about the valiant revolutionaries fighting to overthrow Fulgencio Batista y Zaldivar and his oppressive regime. Once Castro won, however, the magazines took offense at his actions – not so much his summary execution of the worst of Batista’s torturers, but his decision to go socialist and close many mob-owned Cuban brothels.

Photo report's insight:

Mens'story, June 1964.

Cover Painting by Norm Eastman

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Basil Gogos paintings | Pulp cover

Basil Gogos paintings | Pulp cover | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Basil Gogos is an American illustrator best known for his striking portraits of movie monsters which appeared on the covers of Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine in the 1960s and 70s.


Born to a Greek family living in Egypt, Basil was 16 years old when he and his family immigrated to the U.S. Interested in art from a young age, Gogos spent his early adult years working at various jobs and studying art periodically with the goal of eventually becoming a fine artist. Gogos attended several New York area schools including The National School of Design, The Phoenix School of Design and The School of Visual Arts. While attending the Art Students League of New York, Gogos had his greatest artistic growth studying with noted illustrator Frank J. Reilly. After winning a competition at the school sponsored by Pocket Books, Gogos began his professional career with the cover painting for a western paperback novel called Pursuit published in 1959.

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Earle Bergey | Pulp artist

Earle Bergey | Pulp artist | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Earle K. Bergey (August 26, 1901 – 1952) was an American illustrator who painted cover art for a wide diversity of magazines and paperback books. Today Bergey is best recognized for creating the iconic cover of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes for Popular Library at the height of his career in 1948.

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Bergey attended Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts from 1921 to 1926. He initially went to work in the art department of the Philadelphia's Public Ledger, and he drew the comic strip Deb Days in 1927. Early in his career, Bergey contributed many covers to the pulp magazines of publisher Fiction House. By the mid-1930s, Bergey made a home and studio in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and he married in 1935.

Photo report's insight:

Throughout the 1930s, Bergey worked freelance for a number of publishing houses. His eye-catching paintings were predominately featured as covers on a wide array of pulp magazines, including romance (Thrilling Love, Popular Love, Love Romances) as well as detective, adventure, aviation, and westerns. Bergey illustrated mainstream publications, such as The Saturday Evening Post, during this time. He illustrated covers for fitness magazines, and he was one of the first major American pin-up artists, contributing numerous covers for men's magazines such as Gay Book Magazine, Pep Stories, and Snappy.

 

During the 1940s, Bergey continued to paint covers for romance, sports, and detective pulp magazines, and he began working on a number of science fiction magazines, including Standard Publications' Strange Stories and Captain Future, and later for Fantastic Story Magazine. His illustrations of scantily-clad women in space helmets served as an inspiration for Princess Leia's slave-girl outfit in Return of the Jedi and Madonna's brass brassiere. Bergey's science fiction covers, often described as "Bim, BEM, Bum," usually featured a woman being menaced by a Bug-Eyed Monster, alien, or robot, with an heroic male astronaut coming to her assistance. The bikini-tops worn by the girls often resembled coppery metal, giving rise to the phrase "the girl in the brass bra," sometimes used in reference to this sort of art.

Paperbacks

In 1948, Bergey made the transition to the rapidly expanding paperback book industry along with skilled pulp artists like Rudolph Belarski, whose work is often confused with Bergey's. While continuing to paint pulp covers at this time, Bergey sold illustrations to at least four leading paperback publishing houses, including Popular Library and Pocket Books. His art graced the covers of dozens of novels and helped to sell millions of volumes. His paperback cover illustrations were as diverse as his work for the pulps. In addition to his work on Anita Loos' famous Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Bergey painted cover art for well-known authors from Émile Zola to the Western master, Zane Grey, whose 1951 Pocket Books edition cover painting for Spirit Of The Border is a Bergey classic. Many of his paperbacks are now cult classics, some featuring hidden self-portraits. Bergey died suddenly in 1952 in a doctor's office with family at his side.

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Anti-Japanese Wartime Propaganda

Anti-Japanese Wartime Propaganda | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

The most profound cause of anti-Japanese sentiment outside of Asia had its beginning in the attack on Pearl Harbor. The Japaneseattack propelled the United States into World War II. The Americans were unified by the attack to fight against the Empire of Japanand its allies, Nazi Germany and fascist Italy.

 

The massive run of propaganda posters the United States government printed and disseminated were about far more than just raising morale back home; they served both practical and psychological purposes. According to Wikipedia: “Anti-Japanese propaganda was used to dehumanize, antagonize, and create fear of the Japanese people and Japanese nation. It was commonplace in the United States and China during World War II. It was designed to help sell war bonds and was coupled with anti-Axis Powers propaganda.”

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Soviet Propaganda Posters

Soviet Propaganda Posters | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Communist propaganda in the Soviet Union was extensively based on the Marxism-Leninism ideology to promote the Communist Party line. In societies with pervasive censorship, the propaganda was omnipresent and very efficient. It penetrated even social and natural sciences giving rise to various pseudo-scientific theories like Lysenkoism, whereas fields of real knowledge, as genetics, cybernetics, and comparative linguistics were condemned and forbidden as "bourgeois pseudoscience". With "truths repressed, falsehoods in every field were incessantly rubbed in print, at endless meetings, in school, in mass demonstrations, on the radio".[1]

The main Soviet censorship body, Glavlit, employed the United States not only to eliminate any undesirable printed materials, but also "to ensure that the correct ideological spin was put on every published item". Telling anything against the "Party line" was punished by imprisonment or through punitive psychiatry. "Today a man only talks freely to his wife – at night, with the blankets pulled over his head", said writer Isaac Babel privately to a trusted friend.

According to Robert Conquest, "All in all, unprecedented terror must seem necessary to ideologically motivated attempts to transform society massively and speedily, against its natural possibilities. The accompanying falsifications took place, and on a barely credible scale, in every sphere. Real facts, real statistics, disappeared into the realm of fantasy. History, including the History of the Communist Party, or rather especially the history of the Communist Party, was rewritten. Unpersons disappeared from the official record. A new past, as well as new present, was imposed on the captive minds of the Soviet population, as was, of course, admitted when truth emerged in the late 1980s".

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Robert McGinnis | Pulp and poster artist

Robert McGinnis | Pulp and poster artist | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Robert E. McGinnis is a world-renowned illustrator whose prolific, award-winning work spans more than six decades. In recognition of his outstanding illustrations, in 1993 he was elected to the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame. In the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame, Robert joined the likes of Norman Rockwell, N.C. Wyeth, Maxfield Parrish, Winslow Homer, Robert Peak, Frederic Remington and Frank McCarthy.


Robert illustrated many magazine articles (The Saturday Evening Post, Good Housekeeping Magazine, Guidepost Magazine, National Geographic) and more than 1,200 paperback book covers, playing an important role in the pulp fiction boom in the 1960s and 1970s. His work covers many genres and subjects, from detective novels to thrillers, Gothic novels, murder mysteries, romance novels and Old West novels.

Robert illustrated more than 40 movie posters (including the James Bond 007 films Thunderball, You Only Live Twice, Diamonds Are Forever, and Live and Let Die; Breakfast at Tiffany’s; The Odd Couple; Barbarella; and more recently, The Incredibles). His movie poster illustrations depicted stars such as Sean Connery, Roger Moore, Audrey Hepburn, Walter Matthau, Jack Lemmon, Jane Fonda, Burt Reynolds, Raquel Welch and James Coburn.


Robert also creates gallery-quality paintings from his own imagination and depicting such favorite subjects as alluring ladies, tranquil nature scenes, and Old West scenes (such as the one that depicted John Wayne’s character in a scene from the movie The Searchers; that image appears on the cover of the book “Tapestry: The Paintings of Robert E. McGinnnis”).

Robert considers himself very fortunate to still be creating artwork to this day. He loves, and lives, to paint. And he is sincerely grateful to those who enjoy his artwork.

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Pulp artist | Charles Copeland

Pulp artist | Charles Copeland | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Charles Copeland (1858–1945) was an American book illustrator active from about 1887 until about 1940. He was a member of the Boston Watercolor Society and the Boston Art Club. His illustrations were used in a variety of books and magazine (pulps).

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Pulp and comics artist | Earl Norem

Pulp and comics artist | Earl Norem | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Earl Norem often credited simply as Norem, is an American artist primarily known for his painted covers for men's-adventure magazines published by Martin Goodman's Magazine Management Company and for Goodman's line of black-and-white comics magazines affiliated with his Marvel Comics division. Over his long career, Norem also illustrated covers for novels and gaming books, as well as movie posters, baseball programs, and trading cards.

 

Norem saw military action in World War II with the 85th Regiment of the 10th Mountain Division. He trained in Colorado and Texas, and fought the Germans in the Northern Apennine Mountains of Italy. By age 20, Norem was a squad leader and staff sergeant who in the Italian Campaign fought alongside famed skier Torger Tokle, whom he had seen ski jumping at Bear Mountain, New York when Norem was 12. Upon Torkle's battlefield death on March 3, 1945, Norem was one of the men assigned to retrieve his body from the mountain. Norem himself later was wounded going into the Po Valley, ending his military stint.

Upon returning to the US, Norem embarked on an illustration career.

 

Norem worked on such Marvel projects (and Curtis Magazines, Marvel's black-and-white magazine imprint) as Savage Sword of Conan, He-Man and the Masters of the Universe Magazine, Marvel Preview, Tales of the Zombie,Monsters Unleashed, Essential Marvel Horror, Planet of the Apes, Rampaging Hulk, Hulk!, The Silver Surfer, and storybooks featuring Spider-Man and the Fantastic Four.

Norem has produced illustrations for magazines such as Reader's Digest, Field and Stream, Ski, Real West, and Discover.

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Michel Gourdon | French pulp cover

Michel Gourdon | French pulp cover | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Michel Gourdon est un illustrateur français, né à Bordeaux le 20 novembre 1925 et mort le 15 mars 2011 au Coudray (Eure-et-Loir)1. Il est connu pour ses couvertures de romandes éditions Fleuve noir. Il est le frère de l’illustrateur Aslan.

 

Michel Gourdon étudie à l’École des beaux-arts de Bordeaux, de 1941 à 1945. Il monte à Paris en 1946. Il y fait du dessin animé, puis du dessin industriel. Parallèlement, il collabore à Nous Deux, à Paris-Flirt, aux Éditions Mondiales, aux éditions Ferenczi. Il réalise les dessins de couverture d’un magazine de vulgarisation scientifique.

Créée en 2011 à Puteaux, l’Association Les Amis de Michel Gourdon , s’est donnée pour objectif de mieux faire connaître l’œuvre de cet artiste. Elle a publié, en novembre 2012, un livre : Regard sur un illustrateur - Michel Gourdon.

 

En 1950, lorsque Armand de Caro lance les éditions Fleuve Noir, il commande à Michel Gourdon les couvertures de ses livres. Michel Gourdon illustre les collections Angoisse, Aventurier, Espionnage, Feu, Spécial Police, Grands Romans et Présence des femmes, avec une prédilection pour Angoisse. Seule la collection Anticipation est laissée à Brantonne. C’est Michel Gourdon qui, pendant les vingt premières années, illustre les couvertures des romans de la série San-Antonio. Pour donner un visage au héros de Frédéric Dard, il s’inspire, sur certaines couvertures, du comédien Gérard Barray6. Durant les années 1960, il dessine parfois jusqu’à vingt couvertures par mois.

Dessinateur en vogue, il travaille en outre pour la publicité, la presse (Radar) et réalise quelques affiches de cinéma — la plus célèbre étant celle de La Vache et le Prisonnier.

Il excelle dans la peinture des personnages féminins. Aussi, en 1963, est-il contacté pour dessiner des pin-ups dans Lui, un magazine érotique qui va voir le jour. Débordé de travail, il refuse l’offre, et recommande son jeune frère Alain — le dessinateur Aslan —, qui devient célèbre grâce à cette collaboration.

 

Michel Gourdon réalise trois mille cinq cents illustrations pour les éditions Fleuve Noir. Une seule est refusée : le décolleté d’une fille soldat y est jugé trop profond.

 

Mais les éditions Fleuve Noir cherchent à rester au goût du jour, testent de nouveaux styles de couverture, et ne vont pas tarder à préférer la photographie au dessin. En 1970, Michel Gourdon cesse de dessiner les couvertures de la série San-Antonio : la dernière est celle de Ma langue au Chah. En 1978, sa collaboration avec les éditions Fleuve Noir prend fin.

 

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Terror tales | Pulp Covers

Terror tales | Pulp Covers | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Terror Tales was originally published by Popular Publications. The first issue was published in September 1934. One of the most successful horror magazines, it was joined shortly afterwards (1935) with its sister horror pulp, Horror Stories, also from the same publisher. Some of the writers whose work appeared in Terror Tales included E. Hoffmann Price, Wayne Rogers, Wyatt Blassingame (who later wrote nonfiction books for children), Ray Cummings, Paul Ernst, Arthur Leo Zagat and Arthur J. Burks. Rudolph Belarski provided several covers for the magazine. Terror Tales ceased publication in March 1941.

A later publication of the same name was a black-and-white horror-comics magazine. Terror Tales was published by Eerie Publications from 1969 to 1979.

Terror Tales followed many of the conventions of the horror comic genres, such as the use of scantily-clad damsel in distress covers.

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Lace Panty Commandos – Pulp Fiction

Lace Panty Commandos – Pulp Fiction | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

The phrase “Lace Panty Commandos” has become kind of an ongoing joke with some readers of the Men’s Adventure Magazines Facebook group that’s associated with this blog.

I think it started when I wrote a note in the FB group about a guest post done here by Tom Ziegler, author of book BRUCE MINNEY: THE MAN WHO PAINTED EVERYTHING.

One of the Bruce Minney covers paintings Tom featured was used for the June 1963 issue of MAN’S BOOK magazine.

MAN’S BOOK was a “sweat mag” style adventure magazine published from 1962 to 1971, initially by Reese Publishing Co., Inc. and then by EmTee Publications, Inc.

Both companies were owned by two nice Jewish guys with politically incorrect imaginations, B.R. “Bud” Ampolsk and Maurice Rosenfield (spelled Rosenfeld in some sources).

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Pulp artist | Emmett Watson

Pulp artist | Emmett Watson | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

Emmett St. Clair Watson, Jr., was born January 30, 1893 in Richmond, Virginia. His parents were Emmett and Julia B. Watson, both of whom were born in Virginia. His father was the manager of a wood & coal fuel company. Emmett Watson was the second oldest of seven siblings. They lived at 503 Miller Avenue, Brookland, VA.

 

In 1900 the family moved to 2614 East Grace Street in Richmond, Virginia, where his father worked as a wholesale merchant. By age thirteen he had finished the sixth grade and worked full-time at a local engraving company that poduced advertising. By 1910 he was a staff artist at the company.

He served as a cartographer in the U.S. Army during WWI and was stationed in France. His infantry was made famous by another regimental member, Joyce Kilmer, whose celebrated poem about their war experience, "The Rouge Bouquet," was made into a Hollywood motion picture starring James Cagney, called "The Fighting 69th."

 

After the war he had moved to New York City to open his own art studio at 48 East 34th Street in Manhattan. His first published assignments were line drawings for advertising and interior story illustrations. (...)

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Pulp artist | Allen Anderson

Pulp artist | Allen Anderson | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

ALLEN ANDERSON (1908-1995)

Allen Gustav Anderson was born January 31, 1908 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. His father was John Bernard Anderson, born 1884 in Pennsylvania of Swedish ancestry. His mother was Anna M. Lewis, born 1887 in Connecticut of German ancestry. He was the younger of two sons. His older brother was Richard, born 1906 in Minneapolis. They lived at 2639 Upton Avenue.

His father was a professional cook at a prominent local hotel, The Radisson, which grew to become a corporate hotel chain.

He studied correspondence art courses at The Federal Schools, Inc. of Minneapolis and received his certificate diploma in 1928.

He worked as a staff artists at Fawcett Publications in Minneapolis from 1929 to 1939, where he met Carl Buettner, Ralph Carlson, and his lifelong best friend,Norman Saunders. Anderson's early painting style was strongly influenced by Saunders, but Allen Anderson soon developed his own distinctive style.

He moved to New York City in 1940 and painted covers for pulp magazine published by Ace Magazines, Fiction House, Harry Donenfeld, and Martin Goodman.

He married first wife, Aline, in 1942.

Anderson joined the Navy in WW2 and was an instructor at a naval training camp in Upstate NY, where he taught sign painting.

He divorced after the war and resumed his freelance career painting pulp covers.

Anderson also painted comic book covers for Ziff-Davis from 1949 to 1953.

He failed to find any interest in a syndicated comic strip and animated series that he designed named Pinky Pete. It was based on a character like Tom Thumb, who lived in the Wild West and was named Pinky Pete.

In 1953 Anderson married his second wife, Joan, and moved to Tillson, NY to open a small ad agency and sign painter.

Allen Anderson died at age 87 of heart problems on October 23, 1995.

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Twelve vintage magazine cover with animal attack themes

Twelve vintage magazine cover with animal attack themes | Vintage & images | Scoop.it

"It’s been a while since our last collection of animal attack magazine covers, so on this lovely Friday (at least where we are) we thought we’d give nature a chance to express its opinion about humanity. And its opinion is: “I hate all of you. Even the pretty ones.” We have eleven more examples of nature's unreasonable stance below, including a great piranha cover that features the one guy who in real life would know better than to be attacked being attacked. Anyway, just to give you an idea how many men’s magazines there were, and how pervasive this animal attack theme was, all the publications we've posted are different. There are actually even more, but we couldn’t locate good scans of those. Which reminds us to thank the original uploaders on these."

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