Vikings and Anglo-Saxons
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New and classic translations bring clarity to medieval poems

New and classic translations bring clarity to medieval poems | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“Maurice Riordan (Ed): The Finest Music; Ciaran Carson: From Elsewhere”
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This is what living in the Viking age looked like

This is what living in the Viking age looked like | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“ Explore one of northern Europe's largest Viking settlements in Denmark through this digital reconstruction.”
Via Maree Whiteley
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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, December 2, 2014 1:16 AM

Incredible Viking settlement recreated..."This is the best example if a Viking settlement we have in Northern Europe...In the animation above, the National Museum shows us round the entire 50 hectare site.

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Researchers say Viking women helped colonize new lands

Researchers say Viking women helped colonize new lands | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“According to researchers, Vikings were likely family oriented and brought women and children along on trips to settle new lands.”
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English Women Fell in Love with Vain Vikings

English Women Fell in Love with Vain Vikings | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“These decorated combs found in Western Norway made ​​of reindeer antlers show that the Vikings were concerned about how they looked. (Photo: Ane Bysheim / University Museum of Bergen) English sourc...”
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Gemæcca: Anglo-Saxon ethnic origin stories

Gemæcca: Anglo-Saxon ethnic origin stories | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
I'm actually rather fond of the temple scene—and proud of coming up with a picture of how some parts of Anglo-Saxon beliefs might have worked—but I know it's most likely not true. It's a relief to have figured out how, in the ...
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Decoding Anglo-Saxon art | British Museum blog

Decoding Anglo-Saxon art | British Museum blog | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
Rosie Weetch, curator and Craig Williams, illustrator, British Museum One of the most enjoyable things about working with the British Museum's Anglo-Saxon collection is having the opportunity to study the intricate designs of ...
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Old English Translator

Old English Translator | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
Old English Translator - Translate Old English text and words to Modern English and Modern English text and words to Old English

Via Stefano KaliFire
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Old English: The Language of the Anglo-Saxons

Old English: The Language of the Anglo-Saxons | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“ Old English is an early form of the English language and dates from the mid-5th to late 11th century A.D. It was written and spoken by the Anglo-Saxons”
Via Elizabeth Kimball
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How Vikings killed time

How Vikings killed time | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“The Vikings played ball, lifted stones and wrestled. Often the games turned violent and bloody, occasionally resulting in death.”In a new study, Leszek Gardela uses archaeological findings and careful reading of Viking sagas to describe how Vikings killed time when they were in mood for entertainment.The archaeologist paints a vivid picture of Viking life, but the familiarity of many of the activities suggests that while Vikings had shorter lives and arguably vented their frustrations in more violent ways than what most people do today, leisure time in the Viking Age was not too different from leisure time in 2012.
Via Markus Milligan
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Forget Crimewatch – the Vikings were there first |

Forget Crimewatch – the Vikings were there first | | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“ We think of Vikings as highly aggressive raiders who ravished Europe in the Early Middle Ages but how could these men be controlled when they returned to their homeland after plundering other countries? ” A researcher from the University of Aberdeen, who presented today at the British Science Festival, suggested this is a problem Viking societies themselves were deeply concerned about – so much so that they took on the role of early criminal profilers – drafting descriptions of the most likely trouble-makers.So what do you make of this? Is this a society looking for trouble? OR Looking for those who cause trouble?
Via David Connolly
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On the windy edge of nothing: Vikings in the North Atlantic World - Medievalists.net

On the windy edge of nothing: Vikings in the North Atlantic World - Medievalists.net | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“ With a focus upon the Faroe Islands, Iceland and Greenland, Kevin Edwards will present a select narrative of past and recent writings, archaeological enquiry and scientific research concerning the Norse settlement of the North Atlantic.”
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John Ward's curator insight, December 31, 2013 12:43 AM

Viking/Norse settlers were leaving their Scandinavian homelands and Norse-occupied areas of Britain and Ireland from at least the 9th century AD. They may not have been the first visitors to the North Atlantic islands, but they certainly left strong signs of their presence and of landscape impacts. The claims for a pre-Scandinavian population of Celtic monks (papar) on the Faroe Islands are examined along with evidence for early field systems and agriculture.

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The First Vikings - Archaeology Magazine

The First Vikings - Archaeology Magazine | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“ Two remarkable ships may show that the Viking storm was brewing long before their assault on England and the continent”
Via SIN JONES
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Middle Ages tagging found in Oslo - The Foreigner

Middle Ages tagging found in Oslo - The Foreigner | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
With three letters, the message from the past is short and may not pass today’s moderators.
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What caused the Viking Age?

What caused the Viking Age? | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“The author develops the theory that a bulge of young males in Scandinavia set out to get treasure to underpin their chances of marriage and a separate domicile.”
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A Clerk of Oxford: The Anglo-Saxon O Antiphons: O Rex Gentium, Christ the Craftsman

A Clerk of Oxford: The Anglo-Saxon O Antiphons: O Rex Gentium, Christ the Craftsman | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“'Mend what is now in ruins': the Old English version of 'O Rex Gentium' http://t.co/vAS2XhmXgB http://t.co/SGvuFG3FV9”;
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Beer and Beef: Why the Vikings' Elaborate Feasts Died Out - Live Science

Beer and Beef: Why the Vikings' Elaborate Feasts Died Out - Live Science | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“An archaeological dig in Iceland shows that Vikings used to host elaborate feasts with beef and beer to improve their political standing.”
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Europe's oldest book: Ancient Lindisfarne gospel which survived pillaging Vikings and lay in a saint's coffin for centuries

Europe's oldest book: Ancient Lindisfarne gospel which survived pillaging Vikings and lay in a saint's coffin for centuries | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
The St Cuthbert Gospel was buried alongside St Cuthbert, an early English Christian leader, on the island of Lindisfarne off the coast of Northumberland in around AD698.
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Anglo-Saxons left language, but maybe not genes to modern Britons - Science News

Anglo-Saxons left language, but maybe not genes to modern Britons - Science News | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
Modern Britons may be more closely related to Britain’s indigenous people than they are to the Anglo-Saxons, a new genetic analysis finds.
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Staffordshire's Saxon treasure shortlisted for award - expressandstar.com

Staffordshire's Saxon treasure shortlisted for award - expressandstar.com | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
The Staffordshire Hoard Conservation Programme has been shortlisted for an international award as plans get under way for the next phase for the collection.
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Anglo-Saxon arthritis sufferer, graves and swords found by ...

Anglo-Saxon arthritis sufferer, graves and swords found by ... | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
A large Anglo-Saxon arthritis sufferer and a spearhead and knife from the deep grave of an important burial have been found at a Neolithic settlement which later became a Bronze Age burial mound and Saxon cemetery.
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Gambling of high-living Anglo-Saxons revealed by archaeological find

Gambling of high-living Anglo-Saxons revealed by archaeological find | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“ Top-quality backgammon piece found at 7th-century habitation site in Kent It would have been a very expensive toy, expertly crafted and imported across the Channel – and archaeologists say it provides a glimpse of the luxurious life of Anglo-Saxon...”
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Joy Kinley's curator insight, November 22, 2013 9:18 AM

By seeing how people spend their free time we can understand how they lived and see the similarities to our modern lives.

Cameron Crowell's curator insight, November 22, 2013 4:02 PM

High rollers in Anglo-Saxon Britain 

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Faroe Islands were colonised before the Vikings arrived

Faroe Islands were colonised before the Vikings arrived | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
The Faroe Islands were colonised much earlier than previously believed, and it wasn’t by the Vikings, according to new research. New archaeological evidence places human colonisation in the 4th to 6th centuries AD, at least 300-500 years earlier than previously demonstrated.The research, directed by Dr Mike J Church from Durham University and Símun V Arge from the National Museum of the Faroe Islands as part of the multidisciplinary project “Heart of the Atlantic”, is published in the Quaternary Science Reviews.The research challenges the nature, scale and timing of human settlement of the wider North Atlantic region and has implications for the colonisation of similar island groups across the world.
Via David Connolly
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Why Vikings Abandoned Colony in Greenland

Why Vikings Abandoned Colony in Greenland | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“For years, researchers have puzzled over why Viking descendents abandoned Greenland in the late 15th century.”
Via Seth Dixon
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James Good's comment, April 19, 2013 6:33 PM
It would make sense that the Vikings abandoned Greenland because they felt isolated from their mother country. There must have been a strong Scandanavian folk culture that the people of Greenland valued enough to make such a drastic movement. It is very likely that the people of Greenland cherished their home land and its culture. This culture was probably more exciting to them then the dismal life in the far north.

Once the demand for walrus tusks and seal skins decreased, there was really no need for the Vikings to stay in Greenland anyways. If they did not want to become farmers and take advantage of the potential farming land that Greenland had to offer, then there would be no benefit to staying there anyway.
Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 10:25 AM
Humans have been exploring our planet for thousands of years. Settlements are established, and deemed successful or unsuccessful. The successful ones are still around today, however the unsuccessful one’s usually fall to the wayside and are forgotten. Many things can make a colony of human exploration unsuccessful, much like Viking colonies in Greenland. These colonies were abandoned and archeologists have search for the reasons why. Questions of the fertility of the land and available animals to hunt have been reasons that archeologists use to explain the colonial abandonment.
The push and pull factors of ancient Viking life are apparent through their migratory patterns. There are many possible reasons for the Vikings to have left this colony though archeologists are struggling to find just one. Food source seems to be a major reason why other colonies were abandoned, though seal meat does not seem to be at a shortage in this area. Ancient reason of migrating is similar to modern ones, however they are also very different. Globalization has changed the way humans live, the interconnectedness of the world has made living in places that could support life in ancient times possible.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 5:11 PM
Of course they left, who would want to be basically stranded on Greenland away from any other civilization? Not me for sure. Plus, the lack of supplied they were receiving and tools it would have been near impossible to live and thrive in Greenland. They were also losing their identity; they were thinking of themselves more as farmers and ranchers rather than fishermen and hunters, their original identity as Scandinavians. Nonetheless it was imperative that they leave and head home because the colony in Greenland surely would have run dry and died out. If not for the overkilling of seals for food or the bone-chilling winters, I might theorize that they might stay in Greenland however that is not how history unfolded and it doesn’t surprise me that they left. Like James said, once their trade had virtually ceased, the outpost in Greenland was useless because they could be just living back home where you weren’t in extreme weather conditions and living off of seal meat.
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Evidence suggests Vikings grew grain in south Greenland - IceNews

Evidence suggests Vikings grew grain in south Greenland - IceNews | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“ IceNewsEvidence suggests Vikings grew grain in south GreenlandIceNewsArchaeologists from the Danish national museum have finally succeeded in confirming that Erik the Red and his people could indeed brew beer in Greenland when they lived there.”
Via Northern_Clips
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Metal detector Viking find a reminder of how migration and trade shaped British Isles

Metal detector Viking find a reminder of how migration and trade shaped British Isles | Vikings and Anglo-Saxons | Scoop.it
“Viking!” was the word retired businessman Derek McLennan shouted to metal detector enthusiasts standing in a field in Dumfriesshire in south-west Scotland in September.
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