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Video Breakthroughs
Monitoring innovations in post-production, head-end, streaming, OTT, second-screen, UHDTV, multiscreen strategies & tools
Curated by Nicolas Weil
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IBC displays the screens of tomorrow

IBC displays the screens of tomorrow | Video Breakthroughs | Scoop.it

Delegates to this year’s IBC expo in Amsterdam have been able to sample a variety of future displays and file formats, among them an improved Super Hi-Vision.


The NHK-backed Super Hi-Vision is a project familiar to RAI attendees and one the Japanese broadcaster and its industry partners have been been working on since the beginning of the Millennium.


The year-to-year advances have been plain to see. The Sharp prototype 85″ 8K LCD displays clearly performed much better than the ones shown only last year.


A further improvement on show this year was the doubling of Ultra High Definition (UHD) or Super Hi-Vision (SHV)’s frame rate. The side-by-side demo in the show’s Future Zone was so obvious, from completely blurred fast-moving pans on one screen to a very watchable version shot with the 120 frames per second version from NHK’s 8K camera.


UHDTV was ratified by the ITU earlier this year in both the original 60 fps and the 120 fps variety. The demo at this year’s Future Zone, next to hall 8, makes clear that 120 frames per second is an acceptable starting point.

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SnoiD's comment, September 11, 2012 1:09 PM
J'apprécie déjà grandement la HD actuelle (FullHD) je suis vraiment curieux de rencontrer ce type de diffusion notamment en cinéma par exemple :)

Surtout que les premiers retours que j'ai lu sur l'UHD parlent d'un "sentiment de 3D" très impressionnant ! D'ailleurs un article avait été présenté ici même ( BBC favours Super Hi-Vision over 3D )
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8K Ultra High Def TV Format Opens Options for TV Viewing

8K Ultra High Def TV Format Opens Options for TV Viewing | Video Breakthroughs | Scoop.it

With UHDTV standards in place, broadcasters are getting ready to tackle new challenges. The administrations of the International Telecommunication Union recently agreed on two levels of Ultra High Definition Television (UHDTV), making it officially a worldwide standard. 

 

David Wood, who chairs the ITU working group that drafted the UHDTV recommendation, noted that a tough decision would be whether broadcasters would look to start a transition with level one or move immediately to adopt level two. Wood told THR that many broadcasters view the move from HD to 8K as perhaps too great and thinks it is prudent to start with 4K. But NHK, he related, doesn’t see an advantage in shifting to 4K and then making a second jump to 8K.

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Nikkei: ITU near recommending NHK's Super Hi-Vision as official TV standard

Nikkei: ITU near recommending NHK's Super Hi-Vision as official TV standard | Video Breakthroughs | Scoop.it

"We've seen NHK preparing its Super Hi-Vision 8K video since time immemorial. Wouldn't it be nice if the TV broadcast technology was more than just a perpetual research project? If sources for Japan's Nikkei aren't dreaming, the International Telecommunication Union is now 'likely' to declare the format an official standard for broadcasters and TV makers."

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Super Hi-Vision Olympics coverage

Super Hi-Vision Olympics coverage | Video Breakthroughs | Scoop.it

The London 2012 Olympics is remarkable for its television coverage in many ways, not least the use of an ultra-high-definition system called Super Hi-Vision, developed by the Japanese national broadcaster NHK and demonstrated in conjunction with the BBC. Promoted as the future of television, it has sixteen times the resolution of a high-definition image. Seen by informitv on an 8-metre wide screen at BBC Broadcasting House in London, the picture quality is phenomenal.

 

At 7680 x 4320 pixels, the 8K UHDTV2 image has a resolution of 33 megapixels. The projected result is rather like looking through a window direct to the venue, supported by an immersive 22.2 channel surround sound system.

 

The coverage of the opening ceremony put the audience in the best seats in the stadium and allowed them to survey the scene, taking in every detail. Whereas television traditionally cuts from shot to shot in order to provide continuous visual novelty, the wide static shots enabled the viewer to explore the image as if they were actually present. This was partly because of the limited number of camera positions, but also suited the aesthetic of the big screen presentation.

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Compact Hitachi Super Hi-Vision camcorder unveiled by NHK

Compact Hitachi Super Hi-Vision camcorder unveiled by NHK | Video Breakthroughs | Scoop.it

NHK has unveiled a new compact Super Hi-Vision camera which will be used to produce regular SHV content by 2014. The camera will not be used as part of the London Olympics test transmissions. NHK says it plan to start using the camera in SHV production by 2014 after further checks on performance and necessary improvements.

 

The camcorder’s single 33 million pixel (7,680 across x 4,320 high) CMOS sensor and can capture at 60 frames per second.
The SHV signals from the camera are uncompressed and output at a data rate of about 24Gpps for recording variously onto a HDD, SSD or P2 recorder. Recording capacity is 20 to 50 minutes in HDD and SSD (uncompressed), or about 2 hours on P2 (compressed).

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BBC favours Super Hi-Vision over 3D

BBC favours Super Hi-Vision over 3D | Video Breakthroughs | Scoop.it

As part of the BBC’s debate into the long term future of broadcasting it pitted SHV against 3D during the Olympics – and guess which won?

 

The BBC’s internal debate about the future of broadcasting live events appears to be settling on a vision of 8K – or sixteen times the resolution of current HD – rather than 3D. The latest high profile figure to comment on the merits of the two immersive visual systems is BBC Director of Sport Barbara Slater who supervised the 3D broadcasts and Super Hi-Vision experiments in London of the Olympic Games.

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Super Hi-Vision 8K TV standard officially approved by UN agency ITU

Super Hi-Vision 8K TV standard officially approved by UN agency ITU | Video Breakthroughs | Scoop.it

A new high-resolution television format has been approved by the UN's communication standards setting agency.

 

Broadcasts in 8K will offer a resolution of 7,680 by 4,320 pixels - roughly the equivalent of a 32 megapixel pixel photo. That is 16 times as sharp as current HD TVs offering about 2MP resolutions.

 

The UN's Internationalal Telecommunication Union (ITU) discussed the standard in May and offered broadcasters the opportunity to file objections. Because no-one did, a letter was sent out this week confirming the format's approval.

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Why does Super Hi-Vision offer a 3D effect ?

Why does Super Hi-Vision offer a 3D effect ? | Video Breakthroughs | Scoop.it

As the BBC and NHK wow audiences with Super Hi-Vision screenings of the London Olympics, we ask why the ‘future of television’ format is able to provide a pseudo 3D illusion, despite being presented on a 2D screen.

 

It is not difficult to understand why the 7680 x 4320 pixels of picture resolution, immersive 22.2 channel 3D sound and 60 FPS refresh rate impresses viewers more than 3D with its bright super crisp images. But why people acknowledge a 3D effect remains a mystery, even to NHK.


NHK believe Super Hi-Vision will be the final 2D definition and expect the format (also known as Ultra-HD) to be broadcast sooner than the original 2020 target date due to the rapid progress of the technology. Beyond SHV, NHK are looking towards a 3D format known as 'Integral 3D' which requires no 3D glasses and allows the viewers to look around objects.

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With Super Hi-Vision, the TV landscape will look very different ten years from now

With Super Hi-Vision, the TV landscape will look very different ten years from now | Video Breakthroughs | Scoop.it

No sooner are we getting to grips with 3D and HD, and we’re already being told about the “next big thing” in televisual technology. But keep your hat on, this next one is some years away yet.

 

Super Hi-Vision (or Ultra High Definition) has been getting a fair bit of coverage of late, largely due to the BBC’s partnership with Japanese broadcaster NHK for the 2012 Olympics.

 

The technology underlying Super Hi-Vision has been developed in large by NHK’s Science and Technology Research laboratories, which the BBC borrowed to showcase its potential as a broadcasting medium. While the BBC did a tentative test with the technology back in 2010, it was all really gearing up to the Olympics.

 

Super Hi-Vision combines images 16 times the resolution of High Definition television, with a 22.2 multichannel surround sound. As you’d maybe imagine, when viewed on a purpose-built big screen, the effect is phenomenal.

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NHK makes progress with 3D. Expects Super Hi-Vision by 2016

NHK makes progress with 3D. Expects Super Hi-Vision by 2016 | Video Breakthroughs | Scoop.it

Keiichi Kubota, NHK’s Exective Director-General for Engineering, tells 3D Focus that the target date for Super Hi-Vision experimental broadcasting could be brought forward to 2016 and progress is being made with 'true 3D'.

 

Kubota also said that the engineers have made progress with Integral 3D – NHK’s future 3D format that does not require 3D glasses and allows people to ‘look around’ objects.

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