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Video Breakthroughs
Monitoring innovations in post-production, head-end, streaming, OTT, second-screen, UHDTV, multiscreen strategies & tools
Curated by Nicolas Weil
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ACCESS and Verimatrix launch secure multiscreen media sharing solution based on DTCP-IP and protected HLS

ACCESS and Verimatrix launch secure multiscreen media sharing solution based on DTCP-IP and protected HLS | Video Breakthroughs | Scoop.it

ACCESS and Verimatrix announced at TV Connect that they have jointly produced a new product, Verimatrix Gateway to address security concerns around the adoption of multiscreen media sharing. The new product combines NetFront Living Connect, the Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA) component from ACCESS, with the ViewRight Gateway security solution by Verimatrix to provide an integrated security and in-home media sharing solution.

 

The at-show demo sees ViewRight Gateway enable translation between incoming content streams from a managed distribution network, or stored recordings, and corresponding stream formats that are optimized for in-home distribution using NetFront Living Connect. The demonstrated and trusted secure formats are DTCP-IP and enhanced security HLS.

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DLNA premium video support big step for connected home

DLNA premium video support big step for connected home | Video Breakthroughs | Scoop.it

The DLNA’s support for streaming of premium content within the home, announced at IBC and initially for Europe only, is a major milestone in the evolution of connected home services. The move might have come sooner, but DLNA was waiting for maturation of the key underlying technology, DTCP-IP (Digital Transmission Content Protection over IP) to ensure safe and yet transparent delivery of content over IP networks. DTCP itself evolved in the mid 1990s, developed by chip maker Intel in conjunction with four major CE (consumer electronics) companies, Hitachi, Panasonic, Sony and Toshiba.

 

Apart from satisfying content owners, there is another important reason for DLNA’s adoption of DTCP-IP for copy protection around the home, which is to enable consumers to exercise their digital rights to the full. To do this, DTCP-IP enables operators to enforce multi-level rights dependent on the content.

 

DTCP-IP allows consumers to copy and record content subject to permission from the operator or rights holder. The rights are specified in a licence issued by the Digital Transmission Licensing Administrator (DTLA), details of which can be obtained from its website. The idea is that the licence encodes rules into the content, so that, for example, free-to-air terrestrial broadcasts could be recorded and copied without any restriction. In the case of subscription channels, consumers may be allowed to record content for their own subsequent viewing, but not copy it for sending to friends. Then premium content such as movies or live sports purchased on demand or pay-per-view via a specific transaction would probably be fully protected against recording and copying.

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IBC connected home: DLNA now supports premium video

IBC connected home: DLNA now supports premium video | Video Breakthroughs | Scoop.it

The announcement by the Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA) of support for premium video during IBC2011 heralds the coming of age for home networks. The extension of DLNA’s Interoperability Guidelines to include premium video including HD content plugs an important gap in the standard, which previously was confined to streaming user generated content (UGC) between connected devices within the home.

 

The key enabling technology for DLNA’s premium video support is Digital Transmission Content Protection over IP (DTCP/IP), which was developed by five companies: chip maker Intel and CE giants Hitachi, Panasonic, Sony and Toshiba. This group, referred to collectively as 5C, formed an entity called the Digital Transmission Licensing Administrator to license the DTCP technology. Designed specifically for the home network, DTCP encrypts content between devices within the home after checking that they both support the standard.

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DLNA premium video will soon be at a screen very near you

DLNA premium video will soon be at a screen very near you | Video Breakthroughs | Scoop.it

One of the most significant announcements to come out of last year’s IBC in Amsterdam was also one of the least reported. It was DLNA (Digital Living Network Alliance) Premium Video, which was launched again with rather more fanfare at the Las Vegas CES (Consumer Electronics Show) in January 2012, but still failed to register the attention it deserved. This may have been because DLNA Premium Video still looked like vaporware, with no certified products yet supporting it, but that has now changed. Soft At Home has become one of the first vendors to embed DLNA Premium Video in its software, bringing the promise of universal access to top movie and sports content, from tablets, PCs, smartphones, and games consoles around the home.

 

The fact that DTCP-IP, as well as DLNA Premium Video itself, enjoys strong industry backing, has already gone some way to winning over the big content houses. DTCP/IP was developed by five companies, chip maker Intel and the four CE makers Hitachi, Panasonic, Sony and Toshiba. This group, referred to collectively as 5C, formed an entity called the Digital Transmission Licensing Administrator to license the DTCP technology.

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Technology to watch out for: DTCP-IP

Technology to watch out for: DTCP-IP | Video Breakthroughs | Scoop.it

I’ve been meaning to explain this acronym for a while, and a recent announcement from the DLNA (who create some of the standards that are supposed to make home streaming simpler) is probably as good a reason as any.

 

Regular readers will recall that I’ve seen various recorders over recent months that have fairly advanced functionality, allowing you to record programmes on the hard disk and then watch it over the home network, and predicted we’ll see more of them.

 

For example, last year’s Panasonic FreeviewHD recorder could do the trick, and it’s due to come to the Humax FreeviewHD boxes too. But, right now, it’s a little limited, because of content control issues – that’s the rules that say, for instance, that some material broadcast on FreeviewHD can only be copied to disc once.

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