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#Sharkwater FULL 720p.

Published on Feb 4, 2013

Internationally award winning documentary by Rob Stewart.

Sharkwater - The Story "An eye-opening film...visually stunning... this movie will change the way you see our oceans." - Bonnie Laufer, Tribute Magazine For filmmaker Rob Stewart, exploring sharks began as an underwater adventure.

 
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Molasses Spill In Honolulu Harbor Is Suspected Cause Of Mass Fish Deaths ... - Huffington Post

Molasses Spill In Honolulu Harbor Is Suspected Cause Of Mass Fish Deaths ... - Huffington Post | Via @AesirShark Project: Sharks Clean the Oceans. | Scoop.it
Molasses Spill In Honolulu Harbor Is Suspected Cause Of Mass Fish Deaths ...
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Thoughtful Thursday: 2013 Shark Tagging Re-cap | National ...

Thoughtful Thursday: 2013 Shark Tagging Re-cap | National ... | Via @AesirShark Project: Sharks Clean the Oceans. | Scoop.it
... to protect the sharks off our coast and worldwide. Please make sure you are choosing seafood that caught without harming sharks and do your part to help keep our oceans clean. Hope to see you on the boat next August!
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Sharks Clean the Oceans.

See on Scoop.it - Environment. Sharks Clean the Oceans. Join the discussion.See on www.behance.net (Sharks Clean the Oceans.
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Research: Great whites have life span similar to humans - Capecodonline

Research: Great whites have life span similar to humans - Capecodonline | Via @AesirShark Project: Sharks Clean the Oceans. | Scoop.it

 MIT doctoral candidate and WHOI researcher Li Ling Hamady sorts through great white shark vertebrae that were used to ascertain that these apex predators live for 70 years or more. PHOTO BY: Tom Kleindinst, WHOI WOODS HOLE - MIT doctoral candidate and WHOI researcher Li Ling Hamady sorts through great white shark vertebrae that were used to ascertain that these apex predators live for 70 years or more.

By Doug Fraser dfraser@capecodonline.com January 26, 2014

On July 16, 1945, in the waning days of World War II, the world's first atomic bomb exploded in a blinding flash over the New Mexico desert sending a mushroom cloud of radioactivity 40,000 feet into the air.

Somewhere in the waters off New England, a 32-year-old male great white shark now known as White Shark 105, who'd been born just before the commencement of World War I, was swimming, likely hunting seals, fish or a whale carcass. He'd probably attained his maximum size of a little over 16 feet, and while unaware of the portentous door humanity had just opened, the shark was not unaffected.

In the 15 years of atmospheric nuclear testing that followed, the U.S. alone exploded 228 nuclear bombs before the test ban treaty took effect. That dramatic spike in radioactive carbon, absorbed by plankton after it fell from the sky into the world's oceans and passed up the food chain to the top predators, planted a tiny place marker in the vertebrae of White Shark 105 that could dramatically change how we protect and study Atlantic great white sharks.

To get at their findings, researchers located that spike in radioactivity recorded in the cartilage of eight great white sharks and compared it with other well-known time-series from coral and fish bones that also display that radioactive pulse. Then, the researchers — from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the state Division of Marine Fisheries, and the National Marine Fisheries Service Apex Predators Program in Narragansett, R.I. — were able to show that great whites likely live four times longer than previously demonstrated, results that had been earlier reached using conventional age-counting techniques. Now they know that great whites actually have a lifespan similar to humans.

The good news: Great whites likely produce more pups over a longer period of time. The bad: A longer lifespan could mean they are a lot older when they become sexually mature, making them much more vulnerable to human predation than previously thought.

The granddaddy of all great white sharks, White Shark 105, was caught in 1986 and donated to the Apex Predator Program. Its vertebrae were cleaned up, dried out and filed away in a collection with samples from more than 140 other great whites. There they sat for 27 years waiting only for a special type of detective, equipped with the right tools, to unlock their secret.

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Sharks Vital Part of Ecosystem

Sharks Vital Part of Ecosystem | Via @AesirShark Project: Sharks Clean the Oceans. | Scoop.it

 

Posted by: whalesandmarinefauna | August 6, 2013

 

August 6th, 2013 (Pauline Beart). It has generally been seen that media most of the times portray sharks as dangerous and life-threatening. But experts have different view about the same.

They were of the view that media shows that shark attacks are on rise. But experts were of the view that in reality, shark attacks are quite less.

It will be better to put things across in a manner that sharks and whales have been looking for food in a similar manner like other animals. But such aspect is not shown by the commercial media.

Experts have affirmed that commercial media spends huge amount of money on exploiting sharks image. It has also been found sharks and whales are top predators that mean that they maintain balance in ecosystem.

To cite an example, a video was shot in which a shark was spotted near Boothbay Harbor, Maine. The shark was found to be feeding on carcass of a minke whale carcass. The shark was considered to be the white shark.

Sharks feed on whale carcass and by doing so they are not harming the marine system. In fact, they are helping to clean the ocean. Sharks are important for natural food web and absence of the same can disturb the natural food web.

Please, take action NOW : Stop the cull in La Reunion Island !

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Waves of Action – Clean Ocean Action - Shark River Cleanup ...

Waves of Action – Clean Ocean Action - Shark River Cleanup ... | Via @AesirShark Project: Sharks Clean the Oceans. | Scoop.it
On December 8th, citizens from across the region will volunteer throughout New York and New Jersey for a day of community service.
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