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The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it

By Ferris Jabr

 

"How exactly does the technology we use to read change the way we read? How reading on screens differs from reading on paper is relevant not just to the youngest among us, but to just about everyone who reads—to anyone who routinely switches between working long hours in front of a computer at the office and leisurely reading paper magazines and books at home; to people who have embraced e-readers for their convenience and portability, but admit that for some reason they still prefer reading on paper; and to those who have already vowed to forgo tree pulp entirely. As digital texts and technologies become more prevalent, we gain new and more mobile ways of reading—but are we still reading as attentively and thoroughly? How do our brains respond differently to onscreen text than to words on paper? Should we be worried about dividing our attention between pixels and ink or is the validity of such concerns paper-thin?"


Via Jim Lerman, Gordon Shupe
Gordon Shupe's insight:
I will admit it, I have yet to read an entire novel or non-fiction book (of over a 100 pages) on an electronic device. But that is partly because I don't typically read novels and the non-fiction topics that I am interested in are not yet available in electronic form. But I have read (and do read) comprehend and 'know' a small library's worth of information over the last few years in smaller chunks from the screen of my various devices. I agree with the research and acknowledge the continued need for printed reading skills and materials. But I would also point out that these two formats should not be mutually exclusive, but rather are complimentary. Reading, managing, recalling, citing, validating digital text is quite different from printed text. It may be that printed text is preferable given a certain history/experience/purpose/ or skill set. But there are just as many advantages to electronic texts, and maybe we need to address them as two different important literacies as educators. It reminded me of comments I made when the iPad first came out: http://www.shupester.com/files/iPadDifferent.php iOS / iPad not 'better' but 'good different'?
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Pam Colburn Harland's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:57 AM

I loved the part about mind mapping and the meta-cognitive things we do before we start reading. Great article with research-based facts.

Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, June 20, 2013 3:32 AM

I think that, given time, our brains will adapt. The generation now in primary school are hardwiring their brains from toddlerhood. But for older readers, my own experience is that while the screen grabs the brain and gets me reading, I don't necessarily read attentively.

It might also increase differences between poor and wealthy as those with access to multiple devices may develop differently to those without. But the jury is still out as to who will have the advantage.

Angela Watkins's curator insight, December 30, 2013 3:23 PM

http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/11/so-the-internets-about-to-lose-its-net-neutrality ... http://angelawatkins57.blogspot.com - http://pinterest.com/angeladwatkins

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Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary
In a Google World, how important are words? Very!
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Vocabulary, Keywords, Tagging & Search Skills | Technology Integration, Standards | Ed Tech Thoughts from the Space Coast

Vocabulary, Keywords, Tagging & Search Skills | Technology Integration, Standards | Ed Tech Thoughts from the Space Coast | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Reflections of an educational technology specialist on pedagogy, curriculum, assessment, culture, and technology integration.
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Thinking again about an essay I wrote on the importance of teaching the digital literacy of tagging/keywording, search strategies and how this works hand in hand with verbal literacy, reading and vocabulary.

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What Language Does Your State Speak? ~ Slate

What Language Does Your State Speak? ~ Slate | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it

by Ben Blatt

 

"One of the most interesting data sets for aspiring mapmakers is the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Among other things, that survey includes a detailed look at the languages spoken in American homes. All the maps below are based on the responses to this survey. For instance, Mandarin, Cantonese, and other Chinese dialects are separated as different responses in the data and were treated as different languages when constructing these maps. If those languages had been grouped together, the marking of many states would change. In addition, Hawaiian is listed as a Pacific Island language, so following the ACS classifications, it was not included in the Native American languages map. "


Via Jim Lerman
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Interesting summary views of spoken languages. Thanks Jim, for sharing!

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M. Philip Oliver's curator insight, May 14, 6:49 PM

Fascinating facts

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How Little Do Users Read?

On the average Web page, users have time to read at most 28% of the words during an average visit; 20% is more likely.
Gordon Shupe's insight:

If this is what is happening in the adult population... how does this factor in to reading for the K12 audience?

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Texas library offers glimpse of bookless future

Texas library offers glimpse of bookless future | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Texas has seen the future of the public library, and it looks a lot like an Apple Store: Rows of glossy iMacs beckon. iPads mounted on a tangerine-colored bar invite readers.
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A bold step... 

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50 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Languages - Edudemic

50 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Languages - Edudemic | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Do you think you know everything there is about language? Test your knowledge with these many obscure facts about languages!
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Fascinating- language is absolutely fascinating!

Checkout the bulleted list and then the infographic of the same below. Which one did you like better?

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9 Tips Every Teacher should Know about Google Scholar ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

9 Tips Every Teacher should Know about Google Scholar ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Gordon Shupe's insight:

The last couple of years I have been thinking a lot about verbal literacy's role in effective search skills. This article is a good overview over the power of search and how to hone one's skills, which includes expanding one's operational vocabulary.

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Future of the Book | IDEO

Future of the Book | IDEO | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Exploring the potential of book publishing in digital formats | IDEO
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Now this is what I am talking about! Transforming applications of technology for reading.

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For Those Who Want to Lead, Read

For Those Who Want to Lead, Read | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Whether it's Wikipedia, Michael Lewis, or Aristotle, reading brings a host of benefits to the workplace.

 

"Many business people claim that reading across fields is good for creativity. And leaders who can sample insights in other fields, such as sociology, the physical sciences, economics, or psychology, and apply them to their organizations are more likely to innovate and prosper."


Also from the article...


"Reading increases verbal intelligence (PDF), making a leader a more adept and articulate communicator. Reading novels can improve empathy and understanding of social cues, allowing a leader to better work with and understand others — traits that author Anne Kreamer persuasively linked to increased organizational effectiveness, and to pay raises and promotions for the leaders who possessed these qualities. And any business person understands that heightened emotional intelligence will improve his or her leadership and management ability."

 

 

___________________________

 

A PREFACE TO THIS 4 PART SCOOP SERIES IN DEFENSE OF READING LITERATURE


Have you ever had to defend great literature at a facuIty meeting? Ever struggle to justify fiction as having value during budget crunch discussions? Or, defend a title as having value to a parent, or that parent's offspring for that matter?

 

I've been researching the benefits of literature in pursuit of refining vision and mission statements, and other challenging questions related to my pending application for 501(c)(3) nonprofit status.

 

Today, I've focused upon the real question bluntly phrased, "What are the benefits of reading literature in the real world?"

 

I've come across a few articles today that are responsive to the question from perspectives beyond those of which we who teach literature are already aware. That is to say, articles that bring the value of reading literature to the "rest of the world," and of particular interest to me at the moment, to those who are willing to provide funding to socially beneficial endeavors, IF AND ONLY IF, those efforts can be documented as having measurable impact.

 

Though it is relatively easy to measure improvement impact in literacy education, as literacy is a "can-you-do-it-or-not" skill, it is much more difficult to measure impact of employing that skill in pursuit of wisdom as it has been articulated in great works of our global literary heritage.

 

________________________________________

 

PART 1 OF A 4 SCOOP SERIES IN DEFENSE OF READING LITERATURE
________________________________________

 

This extremely well-documented article goes right at the "What good is fiction in the business world" challenge.

 

A LOT of good apparently!

 

The premise being that great literature can make great leaders, whether they are business leaders such as "Steve Jobs (who) had an "inexhaustible interest" in William Blake; Nike founder Phil Knight [who] so reveres his library that in it you have to take off your shoes and bow; and Harman Industries founder Sidney Harman (who) called poets "the original systems thinkers," quoting freely from Shakespeare and Tennyson" or great political leaders; I had forgotten that the 1953 Nobel prize in Literature went to Winston Churchill who was awarded the prize "for his mastery of historical and biographical description as well as for brilliant oratory in defending exalted human values". (http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1953/)

 

To know that there are those in the business world who recognize that the value of being well-read is a true 21st century skill of great value to both those who lead leaders as well as to those being led in the business world may put us in debt to those who recognize and articulate the values of literature beyond the awareness of non literature educators in curriculum development and decision making positions and in the communities where we dedicate our professional efforts.

 

 

 

~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 


Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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Larry Anderson's comment, February 14, 2013 9:34 AM
For quite a long time, I have contended that "All Leaders Are Readers." Perhaps, it would be stated better as, "All Effective Leaders are Readers!" From years of experience and observation, I can tell a great deal about a person's ability to lead others simply by examining his/her personal library. Too, I will pitch out the name of an author or a great work...then see if that "leader" recognizes who or what I'm quoting. Remember the profound adage gleaned from the epic work by Alfred Lord Tennyson in his "Ulysses," -- "I have become a part of all I've met!"
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Best 5 Ipad Apps for Dyslexia - Dyslexic Advantage

Best 5 Ipad Apps for Dyslexia - Dyslexic Advantage | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Why Buy an Ipad 2 if I have Dyslexia?
 
#1. Great Text-to-Speech:   We found the Triple-Click Voiceover function the easiest to use.
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Full-time School Librarians Linked to Higher Student Reading Scores

Full-time School Librarians Linked to Higher Student Reading Scores | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
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Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading

Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
An Educator's Reading List of Contemporary Literature, Literacy, and Reading Issues...
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Word Lens

Word Lens | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Get Word Lens on the App Store. See screenshots and ratings, and read customer reviews.
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This bizarre app will drop your jaw for free now!

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The Fischbowl: Why I Wouldn't Turnitin

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Once again Karl makes me think. 

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Reading 2.0

Reading 2.0 | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Many educators are worried about how technology is affecting the amount of reading that students are doing. They notice that:


Students are struggling to read and comprehend longer texts.
Students a
Gordon Shupe's insight:

Great summary ~ State of the Readers address!

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5 effective reading response activities on the iPad

5 effective reading response activities on the iPad Paul Hamilton takes us through 5 literacy tasks that allow students to develop reading comprehension on t...
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Well done!

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Reading Fluency Infographic: Countdown to Comprehension

Reading Fluency Infographic: Countdown to Comprehension | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Research shows that reading fluency is the key to building solid comprehension. How can you help your students become more fluent?
Gordon Shupe's insight:

Now appearing on a webpage near you: Content Marketing (a company that sells something offering -content- or information about their area of expertise) in an infographic form. Sort of like an online infomercial but better.

 

I think literacy includes knowing your source. Nice infographic, good infor, but still content marketing.

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The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens: Scientific American | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it

By Ferris Jabr

 

"How exactly does the technology we use to read change the way we read? How reading on screens differs from reading on paper is relevant not just to the youngest among us, but to just about everyone who reads—to anyone who routinely switches between working long hours in front of a computer at the office and leisurely reading paper magazines and books at home; to people who have embraced e-readers for their convenience and portability, but admit that for some reason they still prefer reading on paper; and to those who have already vowed to forgo tree pulp entirely. As digital texts and technologies become more prevalent, we gain new and more mobile ways of reading—but are we still reading as attentively and thoroughly? How do our brains respond differently to onscreen text than to words on paper? Should we be worried about dividing our attention between pixels and ink or is the validity of such concerns paper-thin?"


Via Jim Lerman, Gordon Shupe
Gordon Shupe's insight:
I will admit it, I have yet to read an entire novel or non-fiction book (of over a 100 pages) on an electronic device. But that is partly because I don't typically read novels and the non-fiction topics that I am interested in are not yet available in electronic form. But I have read (and do read) comprehend and 'know' a small library's worth of information over the last few years in smaller chunks from the screen of my various devices. I agree with the research and acknowledge the continued need for printed reading skills and materials. But I would also point out that these two formats should not be mutually exclusive, but rather are complimentary. Reading, managing, recalling, citing, validating digital text is quite different from printed text. It may be that printed text is preferable given a certain history/experience/purpose/ or skill set. But there are just as many advantages to electronic texts, and maybe we need to address them as two different important literacies as educators. It reminded me of comments I made when the iPad first came out: http://www.shupester.com/files/iPadDifferent.php iOS / iPad not 'better' but 'good different'?
more...
Pam Colburn Harland's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:57 AM

I loved the part about mind mapping and the meta-cognitive things we do before we start reading. Great article with research-based facts.

Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, June 20, 2013 3:32 AM

I think that, given time, our brains will adapt. The generation now in primary school are hardwiring their brains from toddlerhood. But for older readers, my own experience is that while the screen grabs the brain and gets me reading, I don't necessarily read attentively.

It might also increase differences between poor and wealthy as those with access to multiple devices may develop differently to those without. But the jury is still out as to who will have the advantage.

Angela Watkins's curator insight, December 30, 2013 3:23 PM

http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/11/so-the-internets-about-to-lose-its-net-neutrality ... http://angelawatkins57.blogspot.com - http://pinterest.com/angeladwatkins

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The e-book revolution is bypassing U.S. elementary schools

The e-book revolution is bypassing U.S. elementary schools | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Textbooks aren't available for e-readers, and the children's literature that is available generally can't be searched by reading level.

Via Jonathan Jarc
Gordon Shupe's insight:

As much as I love my Bible Apps and News Aggregators and I am ready to recite the values of eBooks, I think there are many arguments supporting physical book reading. I feel some of the same regret when I reflected on trying to teach keyboarding using computers rather than using typewriters. But that ship sailed a long time ago, and keyboarding is disappearing skill. One could even argue keyboarding is becoming less necessary with Natural Language User Interfaces that are becoming more prevalent.

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Jonathan Jarc's curator insight, February 12, 2013 2:59 PM

This is concerning, but I don't advocate for full-on integration in reading. I believe balance between digital and analog texts serves all of our students well.

Larry Anderson's comment, February 14, 2013 9:28 AM
Call me Olde School; however, I think there is significant merit in retaining the "hard copy" element to reading. Yes, I read several documents and periodicals electronically. And, it is very handy to have those in electronic form so I may pass them on easily to someone out of my normal, physical reach--or to store in the cloud so I may access them regardless of my physical location. But....there just is hardly anything to compare with sitting and flipping through the pages of a physical book or magazine, especially when pondering the many others who might have flipped those same pages. It's almost like walking up the steps to the U.S. Capitol and pondering the thousands, yea millions, of people who have strode those same spaces--causing the concrete to become misshapen from all that traffic. For me, it's not an "either-or" decision. We should allow (not through intimidating indoctrination) our young learners to experience the joys inherent with both mediums.
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108 Ways to Use Word Clouds in the Classroom…Word Clouds in Education Series: Part 2

108 Ways to Use Word Clouds in the Classroom…Word Clouds in Education Series: Part 2 | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Welcome to a series of posts devoted to the use of Word Clouds. I know you will find new information… whether you are a seasoned user of word clouds, or brand new. I enjoy working with teachers a...
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Grading Oral Expression: A Blind Spot for Teachers

Grading Oral Expression: A Blind Spot for Teachers | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Considering all the time teachers set aside for discussion, it makes sense to find ways to formally measure students' oral contributions, says teacher Kyle Redford.
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Annotexting | Langwitches Blog

Annotexting | Langwitches Blog | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
The following is a collaborative guest post by Michael Fisher and Jeanne Tribuzzi , of the Curriculum 21 Faculty. The companion LIVEBINDER OF INTERACTIVE TOOLS IS HERE.
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Vocabulary, Keywords, Tagging & Search Skills | Technology Integration, Standards | Ed Tech Thoughts from the Space Coast

Vocabulary, Keywords, Tagging & Search Skills | Technology Integration, Standards | Ed Tech Thoughts from the Space Coast | Verbal Literacy • Reading • Vocabulary | Scoop.it
Reflections of an educational technology specialist on pedagogy, curriculum, assessment, culture, and technology integration.
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