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sécurité de l'information et protection de la vie privée
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The Hacking of Federal Data Is Much Worse Than First Thought | USA | Cyberattack | CyberSecurity

The Hacking of Federal Data Is Much Worse Than First Thought | USA | Cyberattack | CyberSecurity | Veille Infosec | Scoop.it
Hackers linked to China appear to have stolen security-clearance records with sensitive data about millions of American military and intelligence personnel.

 

What’s particularly stunning about this development is how quickly it grew into something so severe. Last week, officials estimated that the personal data of 4 million current and former federal employees had been compromised. Then that figure ballooned to as many as 14 million.



Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 14, 2015 9:01 AM
Hackers linked to China appear to have stolen security-clearance records with sensitive data about millions of American military and intelligence personnel.


What’s particularly stunning about this development is how quickly it grew into something so severe. Last week, officials estimated that the personal data of 4 million current and former federal employees had been compromised. Then that figure ballooned to as many as 14 million.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Cyberattack



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A who's who of Mideast-targeted malware

A who's who of Mideast-targeted malware | Veille Infosec | Scoop.it
What do Stuxnet, Duqu, Gauss, Mahdi, Flame, Wiper, and Shamoon have in common? Read this blog post by Elinor Mills on Security & Privacy.

 


Via Gust MEES, Stéphane Koch
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Google Yourself For Safety [Infographic]

Google Yourself For Safety [Infographic] | Veille Infosec | Scoop.it

Show of hands: How many of you have sat in front of a computer and typed your name into a web browser? Don’t be shy. You can admit it. With so much access in so many places, who could blame you for wanting to know where and in what context your name appears online?

The practice has been dubbed “ego surfing,” but as this Backgroundcheck.org infographic posted to online tech site MakeUseOf shows us, searching for one’s name on the web is also a lesson in self preservation — one students and teachers should heed if they want to keep their reputations, and their online identities, intact. Do yourself a solid and take five minutes to complete the Google Yourself Challenge. What you find about yourself might surprise you.

 

 


Via Gust MEES, Stéphane Koch
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