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Meandering Stream

Meandering Stream | VCE Geography | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."


Via Seth Dixon
Peter Phillips's insight:
Over time, rivers snake across the whole of the floodplain available to them. On the Murray River in Australia, a combination of events has meant that the bed has moved over 80 kilometres back and forth. Its traces can be found throughout the landscape. Learning about its story is a life-long journey in itself. I recently completed a 1712km kayaking journey on this river. You can read about it here if you like. http://echuca-murraymouthkayakjourney.blogspot.com.au/2012/11/update-from-peter-phillips.html
This kind of movement over time can be seen in the following animation - a real eye-opener. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QqOfP3gVR4s
and another... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3ub6_VwReY
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Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:32 PM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 7:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:34 AM

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

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Murray River Kayak.: Goulburn River Paddle Day 3: Trawool - Nagambie.

Murray River Kayak.: Goulburn River Paddle Day 3: Trawool - Nagambie. | VCE Geography | Scoop.it

A journal of canoe expeditions along the rivers of Australia's Murray Darling Basin using photographs, stories and information to highlight the beauty, challenges and history of these rivers and the communities they flow through.

Peter Phillips's insight:

Day 3 Goulburn River Paddle: read about how granite from the hills was used to build Flinders Street Station, stories from explorers Hume, Hovell and Mitchell and two of Victoria's finest wineries.

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Peter Phillips's curator insight, February 1, 3:11 PM

Day 3 Goulburn River Paddle: read about how granite from the hills was used to build Flinders Street Station, stories from explorers Hume, Hovell and Mitchell and two of Victoria's finest wineries.

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Murray River Kayak.: Goulburn River Paddle Day 1. Eildon - Molesworth.

Murray River Kayak.: Goulburn River Paddle Day 1. Eildon - Molesworth. | VCE Geography | Scoop.it

Experience an entire river valley through the eyes of a kayaker: mountain to Murray: environment, history and beautiful pictures.

Peter Phillips's insight:

I have just completed a 460 km paddle on the Goulburn River from Eildon to Echuca, from the mountains to the Murray. The Goulburn is a magical river. A true kayaker's river and a hidden gem. Paddling along it is a wilderness experience, right in the heart of Victoria. I saw very few people either on the banks, or on the river, for the entire journey. This page is the first comprehensive entry. It covers day 1 of a total of 7. It introduces the river in the context of an adventure. Through this blog, I hope to share the wonder through personal reflection, insights into the environment and history of areas I paddle through - all supported by beautiful photographs. For a quick overview and daily entries, see https://www.facebook.com/MurrayRiverPaddleEchucaToTheSea. If you like it, let me know. 

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Peter Phillips's curator insight, January 19, 4:18 AM

I have just completed a 460 km paddle on the Goulburn River from Eildon to Echuca, from the mountains to the Murray. The Goulburn is a magical river. A true kayaker's river and a hidden gem. Paddling along it is a wilderness experience, right in the heart of Victoria. I saw very few people either on the banks, or on the river, for the entire journey. This page is the first comprehensive entry. It covers day 1 of a total of 7. It introduces the river in the context of an adventure. Through this blog, I hope to share the wonder through personal reflection, insights into the environment and history of areas I paddle through - all supported by beautiful photographs. For a quick overview and daily entries, see https://www.facebook.com/MurrayRiverPaddleEchucaToTheSea. If you like it, let me know. 

Peter Phillips's curator insight, January 19, 4:23 AM

I have just completed a 460 km paddle on the Goulburn River from Eildon to Echuca, from the mountains to the Murray. The Goulburn is a magical river. A true kayaker's river and a hidden gem. Paddling along it is a wilderness experience, right in the heart of Victoria. I saw very few people either on the banks, or on the river, for the entire journey. This page is the first comprehensive entry. It covers day 1 of a total of 7. It introduces the river in the context of an adventure. Through this blog, I hope to share the wonder through personal reflection, insights into the environment and history of areas I paddle through - all supported by beautiful photographs. For a quick overview and daily entries, see https://www.facebook.com/MurrayRiverPaddleEchucaToTheSea. If you like it, let me know. 

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10 reasons to be hopeful that we will overcome climate change

10 reasons to be hopeful that we will overcome climate change | VCE Geography | Scoop.it
From action in China and the US to falling solar costs and rising electric car sales, there is cause to be hopeful
Peter Phillips's insight:
Whilst we are unlikely to stop climate change, these stories are reason for belief in humanity.
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Global Multidimensional Poverty Index

Global Multidimensional Poverty Index | VCE Geography | Scoop.it

"The global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) is an international measure of acute poverty covering over 100 developing countries. It complements traditional income-based poverty measures by capturing the severe deprivations that each person faces at the same time with respect to education, health and living standards."


Via Seth Dixon
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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, July 21, 2014 11:21 PM

Making sense of poverty.

 

Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 2014 4:54 PM

"Access"--North America Unit

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:01 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

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Murray River Kayak.: How the Murray River course was shaped.

Murray River Kayak.: How the Murray River course was shaped. | VCE Geography | Scoop.it

How the Murray River found its shape. Aboriginal dreamtime, geographical and geological perspectives on how the Murray River formed.

Peter Phillips's insight:

Many publications are highly technical. in this entry, I have tried to use more accessible language, but maintain as much accuracy as possible. If you have suggestions for improvements, let me know.

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Peter Phillips's curator insight, June 2, 2014 11:52 AM

Many publications are highly technical. in this entry, I have tried to use more accessible language, but maintain as much accuracy as possible. If you have suggestions for improvements, let me know.

Peter Phillips's curator insight, June 2, 2014 11:55 AM

Many publications are highly technical. in this entry, I have tried to use more accessible language, but maintain as much accuracy as possible. If you have suggestions for improvements, let me know.

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BMFRC - 1.0.4 - Introduction to Barmah Millewa Forest (Keith Ward GBCMA) - YouTube

Introduction to the Barmah-Millewa Forest.
Peter Phillips's insight:
Barmah-Millewa Forest Research Conference 2013. It is lucky to be able to listen in to these experts as they talk about their work, hopes and areas of concern about this important RAMSAR wetland and Murray River Icon Site. The videos also provide an insight into how scientific studies interact and compliment each other.
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Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | VCE Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 2014 8:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:48 PM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 11:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.

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Meander initiation and braiding in a small river model - YouTube

A 35 minute run in an Emriver Em2 model, beginning with a straight channel. We shot the first few minutes of this simply to capture meander initiation, and t...
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Global forest watch app tracks deforestation

Real time. Information such as conservation status is also available.
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Rescooped by Peter Phillips from GEP Global perspectives on population for the classroom
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Don’t Panic – The Facts About Population

Don’t Panic – The Facts About Population | VCE Geography | Scoop.it

Via Global Education Project, Victoria
Peter Phillips's insight:

Hans Rosling is always worth listening to. A true educator, an entertainer... And almost uniquely in this topic, an optimist.

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Global Education Project, Victoria's curator insight, November 20, 2013 6:42 PM

Full hour-long documentary by statistician Hans Rosling on population and the future of the world.

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Modern Slavery

Modern Slavery | VCE Geography | Scoop.it

"I recently saw this map in a Washington Post article about modern day slavery and was immediately was struck by the spatial extent and amount of slaves in today’s global economy.  As stated in that article, “This is not some softened, by-modern-standards definition of slavery. These 30 million people are living as forced laborers, forced prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides in forced marriages and, in all ways that matter, as pieces of property, chattel in the servitude of absolute ownership.”  This map shows some important spatial patterns that seem to correlate to economic and cultural factors."


Via Seth Dixon
Peter Phillips's insight:

Seth Dixon: What economic and cultural forces are needed for slavery to thrive?  What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today? How are your spending habits part of the system?

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:36 AM

For slavery to thrive you need a big business to produce goods for and a large amount of people to actually do the work for little or no pay. We can try to eliminate by having machines produce goods or paying the workers more and giving them better working conditions. Our spending habits are some what responsible because these slaves our producing our products for us for very cheap. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:15 AM

In my opinion slavery is the worst possible living situation. id rather be be free but have no food suply than to be a slave. its dishearting to look at these numbers and see that 30 million people have to deal with the worst quality of live possible. but what sickens me the most is the lack of information we have been given about this though primary schools. In school we were taught about Lincoln freeing the slaves ans american slavery almost every year. But not a single time did they connect or even touch on that it is a massive problem in the world today. It was to the extend that for a few years i was mislead to thinking that Lincoln made this a slave free world, boy was i wrong. Slavery is revesable though, it can be countered by harser punishments and more restrictions on the slave owners. We could also do our best to make it so they bring in as little money as possible so they are forced to find a different occupation. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:04 PM

MOdern Slavery is a huge problem throughtout the world and especially in Africa and surrounding sister countries. For example, in Africa this map shows us that the slave rate is more than .75 this indicates that there is a small percentage of the country that is not enslaved in some way. This is outrageous for the modern society to think of in todays world especially because as Americans we think of the slave trade and slavery being something that happened many years ago and then slavery was abloished and now nothing bad happens anymore well we couldn't be more WRONG! AMericans are mostly ingornat to the fact that although slavery is not announced in surronding counintents and countries does not mean that it doesn't exist. Another example of this is the Somali blood diamonds and how the children become toy-soldiers and are turned into rebels because if they dont they will be killed so this is the type of society where it is kill or me killed. These CHILDREN are trained to kill anyone and everyone who gets in their way; taken away from their families at a young age and then brainwashed into using their ignorance as bliss.

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Teachers | Murray-Darling Basin Authority

This page contains a collection of educational material to help you bring the Murray–Darling Basin to life in the classroom. Click on the pages below for more information.
Peter Phillips's insight:

Fantastic resource for teachers interested in building an understanding and appreciation of Australian Riverine environments with accurate, Australian Curriculum linked activities.

 

The lesson plans and worksheets have been designed to be accessed by students online or to be downloaded and distributed during class or as homework assignments. The plans and worksheets are linked to the Australian curriculum and are designed for use by teachers of geography, history, science or mathematics... free for download and can be edited or copied as needed.

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Peter Phillips's curator insight, October 6, 2013 1:22 AM

Fantastic resource for teachers interested in building an understanding and appreciation of Australian Riverine environments with accurate, Australian Curriculum linked activities.

 

The lesson plans and worksheets have been designed to be accessed by students online or to be downloaded and distributed during class or as homework assignments. The plans and worksheets are linked to the Australian curriculum and are designed for use by teachers of geography, history, science or mathematics... free for download and can be edited or copied as needed.

Peter Phillips's curator insight, October 6, 2013 1:23 AM

Fantastic resource for teachers interested in building an understanding and appreciation of Australian Riverine environments with accurate, Australian Curriculum linked activities.

 

The lesson plans and worksheets have been designed to be accessed by students online or to be downloaded and distributed during class or as homework assignments. The plans and worksheets are linked to the Australian curriculum and are designed for use by teachers of geography, history, science or mathematics... free for download and can be edited or copied as needed.

Peter Phillips's curator insight, October 6, 2013 1:23 AM

Fantastic resource for teachers interested in building an understanding and appreciation of Australian Riverine environments with accurate, Australian Curriculum linked activities.

 

The lesson plans and worksheets have been designed to be accessed by students online or to be downloaded and distributed during class or as homework assignments. The plans and worksheets are linked to the Australian curriculum and are designed for use by teachers of geography, history, science or mathematics... free for download and can be edited or copied as needed.

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Supervolcanoes on Mars

Scientists have found evidence of supervolcanoes on Mars. Several craters, thought to be created by impacts from space, may have actually been caused by expl...
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Peter Phillips's curator insight, October 5, 2013 7:21 PM

Tower Hill, near Port Fairy and Yellow Stone National Park are examples of calderas. These happen when magma comes in contact with water. The steam pressure that builds up blows the top off the volcano. They are often filled with lakes and are surounded by a rim of light, air -filled volcanic rock. More evidence for water on Mars.

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Murray River Kayak.: Goulburn River Paddle Day 2: Molesworth - Trawool.

Murray River Kayak.: Goulburn River Paddle Day 2: Molesworth - Trawool. | VCE Geography | Scoop.it

Experience an entire river valley through the eyes of a kayaker: mountain to Murray: environment, history and beautiful pictures.

Peter Phillips's insight:

The blog for second day of my Goulburn River Paddle is now finished, describing the river from Molesworth to Trawool. in addition, learn about the Goulburn River High Country Rail Trail, the North South Pipeline, platypus, the Brave Goose Vineyard and how to be safe in a thunderstorm.

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The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided

The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided | VCE Geography | Scoop.it
Stunning satellite images and maps show how east and west differ from each other even today.

Via Seth Dixon
Peter Phillips's insight:

50 years of communist rule still affect opportunities in Germany today, as these maps show. What they don't show is the social mirror that each provides to the other and the rich discussions about social policy that result. Reunification has been an expensive exercise for Germany, however one that it is committed to.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 2014 8:05 PM

These two maps (unemployment on the left and disposable income on the right) are but two examples in this article that highlights the lingering distinctions between the two parts of Germany that were reunited 25 years ago.  The social geographies imposed by the Iron Curtain and the Berlin  Wall are still being felt from this relic border and will for years to come. 


Tags: Germany, industry, laboreconomichistorical, politicalborders.

16s3d's curator insight, November 4, 2014 2:11 AM

On efface pas 40 ans d'histoire en 25 ans, ni même en 40...(?)

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, February 12, 6:20 PM

Info for paper potential paper topic

 

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Africa builds 'Great Green Wall' of trees to improve farmlands (ScienceAlert)

Africa builds 'Great Green Wall' of trees to improve farmlands (ScienceAlert) | VCE Geography | Scoop.it
Twenty African nations have banded together to build a monumental Great Green Wall of Africa - a forest of drought-resistant trees stretching acros
Peter Phillips's insight:
Definitely a good news story. Stand by to be impressed.
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Interactive: 100 years of temperatures in Australia

Interactive: 100 years of temperatures in Australia | VCE Geography | Scoop.it
As much of eastern Australia shivers through a cold front, take a look at 100 years of temperatures.
Peter Phillips's insight:

Whilst the graphic shows that most maximum temp records occur in the last few years, stressing both the human and natural environment, it also demonstrates the complexity of climate. A very interesting interactive, bound to start a few conversations.

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Murray River Kayak.: Where do the sandy beaches in the Murray River come from?

Murray River Kayak.: Where do the sandy beaches in the Murray River come from? | VCE Geography | Scoop.it
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The Arctic, Antarctic and geopolitical manoeuvring

The Arctic, Antarctic and geopolitical manoeuvring | VCE Geography | Scoop.it
The Arctic and Antarctic regions are melting. It’s a serious environmental problem. But it’s also an economic opportunity for those with a geo-political stake in our northern and southern extremes.
Peter Phillips's insight:
Experts present two sides of the same tale. Downloadable podcast and audio.
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Global Oil Reserves

Global Oil Reserves | VCE Geography | Scoop.it

Who has the oil? pic.twitter.com/7Njc7OD8rw


Via Seth Dixon
Peter Phillips's insight:

Saudi Arabia's security does not look so good when it comes to its underground aquifers however... see satellite images detecting the state of these from space.

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Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, March 13, 2014 11:22 PM

Inequalities exist as well

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 26, 2014 6:03 PM

This graph depcits Sauda Arabia with the most oil reserves in at 262 Billion barrels and in second place coming in at 132 billion barrels is Iran. These barrels are a very important assett to not only the US but to the world. This is why gas is so expensive because most of the time the US has to import it from differnt countries in order to obtain the amount we need for resources and mostly everything is based on oil as far as some fossil fuels are concerned. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2014 5:22 PM

India is demonstrated at 2,000-2,999 in range of bbps. This amount of oil reserves is very important to the revenue of the country and the way that the poeple survive, natural resources such as oil are a very important and costly resource to obtain. Having oil in your country helps with trade and revenue income and trade routes are compiled which helps the economy.

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Smithsonian Science Education Center - Why are the seas named Black, Red, White, and Yellow?

Smithsonian Science Education Center - Why are the seas named Black, Red, White, and Yellow? | VCE Geography | Scoop.it
Where do the Black Sea, Red Sea, and the Yellow Sea get their names from?
Peter Phillips's insight:
An interesting, well researched, short article from the Smithsonian.
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Geography in the News: The Growth of Megacities

Geography in the News: The Growth of Megacities | VCE Geography | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Megacities’ Expansive Growth For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas.
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Green projects that protect the land from further desertification (Google / Examiner) | Humanitarian News

Green projects that protect the land from further desertification (Google / Examiner) | Humanitarian News | VCE Geography | Scoop.it
Read at : Google Alerts – desertification http://www.examiner.com/article/desertification-the-next-green-revolution?cid=rss Desertification the Next Green Revolution by Suzanne Edwards Desertification is “the process by which fertile land becomes...

Via Guy Murray
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Victoria Walks: Secondary Schools

Victoria Walks: Secondary Schools | VCE Geography | Scoop.it
The aim of this unit outline is for students to gain an understanding of how people are connected to places in a wide variety of ways, and how these connections help to make and change places and their environments. Through an understanding of walkability, students will investigate perceptions of places, the effects of their leisure choices on places and implications for the future of these places.
Peter Phillips's insight:
Connection to place is necessary before ownership can take place. In this sense, this unit also has potential for sustainability studies and environmental science.
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Why Geography Education Matters

Why Geography Education Matters | VCE Geography | Scoop.it

"This blog-a-thon submission comes from Joseph Kerski of the National Council of Geographic Education (2011 President). Joseph writes about why geography education matters and how it applies to each one of us."

 

 

This was one great orange! Thank you GS!


Via FCHSAPGEO
Peter Phillips's insight:

Using an orange to learn the continents of the Earth :) great idea. 

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Paul Ritter's comment, August 21, 2013 7:32 PM
I never would have known that geography was relevant to so many things. This article opened my eyes to the many issues we encounter on a daily basis and hear about that are part of geography. I am excited to learn more about these topics and now have a better understanding of the importance of learning geography.
austin tydings's comment, August 27, 2013 2:41 PM
Geography, is a subject where it takes all the skills from science, math, English, and social studies, and combines it into a in depth thinking class. It makes you find the problem, fix it and tell how and why you fixed it . For example, a crop is not growing in a dry area, then you try it in a wet area and it grows, now you have to find out why it grows in a wet area and not a dry area and explain why. It is good to start out early learning about the basics in the core classes then later in the more advance classes, to understand how to fix a problem.
Annenkov's curator insight, September 13, 2013 2:09 AM

"Geography education applies to each one of us" - not only for children, but for adults in everyday life. Who is interested in developing a personal geoculture?