Expertiential Design
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Expertiential Design
The art of designing engaging and meaningful user experiences for customer development.
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Mobile-First Is Just Not Good Enough: Meet Journey-Driven Design – Smashing Magazine

Mobile-First Is Just Not Good Enough: Meet Journey-Driven Design – Smashing Magazine | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it
Mobile-first is not specific enough to user needs. Learn more about journey-driven design and how it emerges from a user-centered approach.

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Customer Experience Design: 3 essential skills

Customer Experience Design: 3 essential skills | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it
  One of the six competencies required in the armory of all Customer Experience Professionals is defined by the Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA) as ‘Experience Improvement & Design’. To become a Certified Customer Experience Professional (CCXP), you would need to have knowledge of the following: Design thinking and customer co-creation approaches Process improvement methodologies …

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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, October 29, 2015 12:50 AM

3 essential #CX design skills:


Empathy:

 

In the design process empathy is the ability of taking the perspective of the customer and feeling with them as they experience services.

 

Insight:

 

Arriving at insights is a creative process that combines empathic observations (I saw this) with the experience (I know this) of the designers.

 

Prototyping:

 

Prototypes are visualised service proposals that make their value concrete in a form or another.


Apple stores are a perfect example. Which other brands are capitalizing on customer experience design recently?

Darcy Bevelacqua's curator insight, October 29, 2015 11:19 AM

Customer Experience is really understanding things from your customer's point of view. Not only what they do, but why they do it. understanding requires empathy, insights ( knowing why and why not and what else), and prototyping. The prototyping lets you confirm that what you think you are fixing is actually what the customer wanted and doesn't reflect how the organization thinks the customer would want things to be done. 

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10 Trends Sure To Change Web Design in 2015

10 Trends Sure To Change Web Design in 2015 | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

Updated! Some of the web's smartest thinkers reveal what they believe will transform the web.

Summary & Marty Notes

1. Huge Background Images (Agree, but hard to do well in responsive design).
2. Card Based Design (Agree and need to know more about this since cards = responsive and responsive i.e. platform agnostic is the way to go now).
3. Digital First Branding (Agree and this will be a big shift for many who think of their websites as additions not the MAIN THING).

4. Open Data (Need to know more about this).
5. Responsive Design...Evolved (Agree, Agree, Agree).
6. Privacy (not sure about this one, think that ship has sailed).
7. Isomorphic Java Script (Need to know more about this).
8. Iteration (Agree, we will make MVPs, ship them and then watch and improve them).
9. Vibrant Design (not sure about this one, the example made my eyes hurt).
10. Web Components & Adaptive Design (this is Internet of Things and I agree).


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People don’t use your product because they like the product or business, they use it because they like themselves.

People don’t use your product because they like the product or business, they use it because they like themselves. | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

“People don’t use your product because they like the product or business, they use it because they like themselves.” (Kathy Sierra, Building the Minimum


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Pedro Costa Neves's curator insight, November 28, 2014 3:21 PM

People don’t use your product because they like the product or business, they use it because they like themselves.

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Bauhaus Web Design

Bauhaus Web Design | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

Bauhaus is not only one of the most important design movements in history, but an especially relevant style for Web Designers. Alex and Simone tell you why.

Marty Note
Wow, love this post by SitePoint.com's Web Developer Alex Walker and graphic designer Simone Sala because it both EXPLAINS Bauhaus Design Principles and then applies them with examples to the web. #toogood

The Bauhaus stressed form and function. Removing ornamentation in favor of clarity, ease of use and beauty. Sounds like MOBILE DESIGN to me.

Mobile is so SMALL it forces the right choices. Look how "mobile design" is not impacting web design. Mobile stared trends such as limited color palettes and flat graphics because of limitations (of smart phones), but those limitations can also help FREE up a website and point it more clearly at true north.

True north online is where visitors know what to do and why easily and are so engaged by your content they want to do (what you want them to do) AND they want to share the experience with friends. Mobile's "game console-like" BEING is reshaping marketing (see Marketing's Big Bang Manifesto https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/Tf9GNsX35qn ).

Great, helpful post.



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Best-Designed Mobile Apps via @Quora

Best-Designed Mobile Apps via @Quora | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

Best Mobile App Design
Mobile apps are great web design teachers. Flat, clean and simple are mobile design trends any web design can benefit from. This excellent Quora thread shares powerful mobile app design best in class. Our favorite Pattern.dk.  


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10 Top Flat Webdesigns Inspire

10 Top Flat Webdesigns Inspire | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

Great examples of flat webdesigns. Flat looks better as responsive design another way of saying it looks better on phones and pads. My faves here are the doesn't seem flat Beagle Ship and the Boldial WP theme.

 


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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, September 15, 2014 11:57 AM

add your insight...

Przemyslaw Malkowski's curator insight, January 10, 1:51 PM

Dla inspiracji - 10 ciekawych projektow stron tzw. "flat". Najnowszy trend wsrod stron www zbierajacy coraz wieksza rzesze fanow.

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What Waiting Tables Taught Me About Designing Better Websites w/ UX Design

What Waiting Tables Taught Me About Designing Better Websites w/ UX Design | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it
What do waiting tables and UX design have in common? One UX director weighs in on how we can learn how to handle design problems from the physical world.

 

 

 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Michael Allenberg's insight:

Excellent take on life Experiences... Trust me, I know.

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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, August 25, 2014 1:07 AM

Waiting tables is great training for many professions. Waiting, or serving people, teaches many important skills such as listening, being nice and being careful. In this excellent How Design post a UX (User Experience) designer talks about lessons learned waiting tables that help him design better websites.


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Clean & Simple Website Design Trends In 2014

Clean & Simple Website Design Trends In 2014 | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it
Like the World Wide Web itself, the world of website design is constantly in flux as technologies change and design standards evolve. What worked in 2013 may

 


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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, July 29, 2014 2:30 PM

Worth revisiting some of these web design trends. What is the engine behind these trends? Social / Mobile web. Like the "winners" and "losers" organization here.

Carlos Polaino Jiménez's curator insight, July 29, 2014 2:59 PM

En el momento en que me lo estoy planteando

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Top 10 Mistakes in Web Design

Top 10 Mistakes in Web Design | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

The 10 most egregious UX offenses against users. Web design disasters and HTML horrors are legion, though many usability atrocities are less common than they used to be.

Marty Note
If you took a day and fixed any of these Top 10 Web Design Mistakes That Apply you would make 50% more this holiday season. These are "cost of poker" fixes that can easily remain for years and years. Every year one of these mistakes exists your website is 10% less effective.

When you make 2 or more of these mistakes you pay with an order of magnitude more pain for each added mistake so 2 mistakes doesn't cost you 20%. No 2 mistakes cost you 200% of what your website could be doing for you.

Fix all 10 of these basic problems and your site is on its way to its "mission critical" place in your company.

 


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RETHINK Web Design: Unusual Web Navigations Inspire | AWWWARDS

RETHINK Web Design: Unusual Web Navigations Inspire | AWWWARDS | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it
Beautiful Unusual Navigation Designs for Inspiration. Selection of Awwwards websites with a strong presence of unusual navigation. An effective navigation design is crucial for a website

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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, June 26, 2014 9:29 PM

Navigation feels old and moldy. There are few things MORE critical than navigation. We've moved from left nav sitting firmly in the "golden triangle" to horizontal top navigation.

Neither of these options inspire and both are feeling long in the tooth and stupid. The social / mobile web requires a RETHINK about navigation. Can we find ways to make very page a homepage?

Can navigation be more relevant and less middle of the road boring? Here are some navigation examples from AWWWARDS.com that don't solve the problem...yet. But the dialogue helps begin the process of reducing our dependency on static, boring, "has-been" ideas like left or horizontal nav.

Are you as surprised that navigation hasn't been on the "top changes" list for web design in 2014? Has to be on our 2015 list because every current option is BAD and getting worse.

BOUTELOUP Jean-Paul's curator insight, June 27, 2014 2:21 AM

Merci ! il est bon de repenser aussi le webdesign pour une nouvelle expérience utilisateur

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Bold, Beautiful, Brash Website Designs

Bold, Beautiful, Brash Website Designs | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it
For a while now, designers have been absolutely infatuated with all things subtle. We love subtle patterned backgrounds and intricate decorative elements; we

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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, April 18, 2014 11:37 PM

Love these bold and brash website designs. Like the Diehl "Forensic Architecture" idea the best. M

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Does Your Web Design SING? New Neuromarketing Research Suggests It Should

Does Your Web Design SING? New Neuromarketing Research Suggests It Should | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

How does your web design SOUND? Strange question, but new neuromarketing research suggests we mentally sound out words we read. Implications for web designers are significant and new.

Most web designers care about how their design LOOKS, but maybe we should worry about how our sites SOUND too. Sound is a HUGE learning aid and one easy to overlook as we focus on colors, font and line.

Adds weight to how VOGUE uses alliteration to create powerful marketing as discussed in 8 Visual Marketing Tips from Vogue
https://www.haikudeck.com/visual-marketing-8-tips-from-vogue-art-and-design-presentation-QPRubvrcT8

and on Scoop.it
http://sco.lt/8qjz7Z

 


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Tools For Creating Web Designs of the Future via Smashing Magazine

Tools For Creating Web Designs of the Future via Smashing Magazine | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

Future Tools
This is a great web design post. Don't worry if you don't know or understand only about half of it. Importance is in the tools suggested to test, design and pivot toward a future of more flexible web design.

But there's a problem.

I created my first highly static website in 1999. Not static in the sense we didn't update it since we updated it all the time. Static in the servers and code we used. Today and especially true tomorrow your websites will need to fly around the web curating information from the 4 corners of the web.

The more "flying around" your website does the greater the stress on your backend serving architecture and the more the need for the cool web design tools outlined in this Smashing Magzine post.  


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Stealing Ecommerce Tips from the Museum of Modern Art

Stealing Ecommerce Tips from the Museum of Modern Art | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

MoMA's Store Rocks
Wow, I don't usually think of museums as sources of ecommerce inspiration and learning, but the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) has a special team you can learn a lot from. MoMA's team excels at ecommerce blocking and tackling such as:

Great email followups (abandon cart, push emails)Great promotion schedule understands DEADLINES and web's constant NOW Easy to understand and use navigationGreat clean lines and images Tells great visual stories

 

Best ways to make money online is to excel at the basics. MoMA doesn't stop there they excel at advanced ecommerce ideas too such as:
 
Bundled and "this = that" merchandisingDeveloping exclusive products and bundlesEmail marketing


MoMA's backend could be better. They take too long to ship, but once their products arrive they are packed carefully and with a sense of how special the order is / was. If you want to learn ecommerce you should follow and visit the Museum of Modern Art. 


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5 Simple Rules To Know Your Site's Navigational Taxonomy via @Curagami

5 Simple Rules To Know Your Site's Navigational Taxonomy via @Curagami | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

Knowing your website's navigational taxonomy can mean the difference between millions in traffic and money. Here are 5 Simple Navigational Taxonomy Rules.

* It's About THEM not YOU.
* Create A Commons.
* It's FREE and EASY.

* Srart with Brands & Work OUT.

* Find Engagement & Work IN.

Easy to follow rules so your site's nav WINS traffic, hearts, minds, SEO and loyalty needed to be around for a bit.


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5 Must Knows BEFORE You Design A Website

5 Must Knows BEFORE You Design A Website | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

Team Curagami (http://www.Curagami.com ) has, over the course of our combined careers, helped thousands of clients build websites and about 99% have cart before the proverbial horse. "What is our design going to look like," they ask.

Most think "web design" is creating the look and feel of a site. Actually the look and feel, while important, is at least #6 on the "do these things to create a great web presence" list. Here are the first 5 things on that list:

1. Elevator Pitch - Who Are You?
If we were riding in an elevator could you explain your business before we reached your floor? If NO is your answer you are not alone and you need to go back to the drawing board and practice until you have your "elevator pitch" down. All things flow from that defining snippet.

Tags can help define your elevator pitch. Curagami.com Cool Tools For Ecommerce Merchants explains what we do in 5 words. Note that I don't have the the site yet so do as we are saying not as we do (always :).

2. Pain Point - Whose Your Tribe?
We create stuff to DO SOMETHING. Your product or service must help some tribe. Curagami helps ecommerce merchants understand content marketing because finding the balance beam between content that works and content that hurts is a CSF (Critical Success Factor) for ecommerce merchants. So our tribe begins with ecom merchants and we address the PAIN of understanding content marketing. We don't LIMIT ourselves. We don't say, "Go away" to B2B SaaS clients but they are cream on the top of our core tribe and mission.

3. UCA - What Are Your Customers' Aspirations
Unique Customer Aspirations is a metrics we developed as Marketing Director for Atlantic BT. UCA speaks to the transformation your content, product and service creates. Yes Curagami helps merchants make more money, but we also relieve the STRESS of not knowing what to do and why. We help merchants have confidence in their content. No one can build sustainable online community (everyone's master goal whether they know it or not) without being confident in their ability to create, share and curate content. Content is king online and the implications of that statement go far and wide. It's not enough to know your tribes shape you must know their CHARACTER too. Our tribe is STRESSED OVERWHELMED and WORRIED. Anything we do to relieve any of that makes our content sticky and sure to be shared.

4. Know Difference Between Content CREATION and CURATION
Being able to create content is important. We suggest our clients create about 10% of content from unique brand based strings. 90% of the content we want clients to share, discuss and riff off of comes from gurus, customers and THE OTHER. The other is anyone other than you and keeping tabs on your category information, knowing what matters most to your readers and why and understanding the need to tuck ego in back pocket and share competitive information is one of the hardest skills we teach. Web marketing is MOSTLY about THEM not YOU so knowing when you need to blog vs. when you need to comment is key.

5. Know Social Marketing Basics
I'm staying at The Blackwell Inn in Ohio while being treated at Ohio State's James Cancer Center. I've tweeted several positive comments @theBlackwell. Noneof those comments have been ReTweeted and they don't follow me.

ERROR.

My social following dwarfs theirs so breaking the FOLLOW BACK rule hurts 'em. By not picking up my @tweets they discourage such shares and lose the value of that communication (that they actually LISTEN and CARE). I think they do listen and care, but they don't have the skills to do so ONLINE. Before you create a website you need to know what's up in social media.

The Blackwell's lackof knowledge isn't fatal since they are located on Ohio State's campus and are the ONLY such hotel so located. They can SUCK at social media (for a bit) without pain. Doubtful your website, especially if it brand spanking new can afford such a deficit.

Since the master goal of your site is the creation of sustainable online community NOT understanding the implied contracts and un-stated ways social media works can be DEADLY.

Know those 5 things and we can begin to discuss wireframes, look and feel and visual marketing :). Marty

One More Thing - reason this stuff is so important, as my friend Frank Pollock would explain, is the web is a lie detecting amplifier. If you lie it will be shared with the world and known instantly or before, so don't lie. If you are CONFUSED, as many SMBs are, get STRAIGHT before you put crayon to paper and design a site or risk having your confusion being your main message.


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Future Of Web Design: End Of Boxes & Borders via @HaikuDeck

Future Of Web Design: End Of Boxes & Borders via @HaikuDeck | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

Web Design
Cha Cha Changes are ahead for web design. Our social / mobile / connected world is blowing up our wireframes. and that's a good thing.


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Who Did MoMA Hire To Create Their Web Store? Yugo Nakamura

Who Did MoMA Hire To Create Their Web Store? Yugo Nakamura | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

Japanese web designer Yugo Nakamura has created some cool sites. Great clean lines, white backgrounds, splashing of color, movement both real and implied reminds me of Haring, Warhol and de Kooning. #toogood #webdesgin

 


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Genius Transitions In User Experience Design - Smashing Magazine

Genius Transitions In User Experience Design - Smashing Magazine | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it
This article looks at some examples of interaction design in which smart interaction, defined by subtle animation, gently improves the user experience. We’ll share some lessons drawn from various models and analyze why these simple patterns work so well.

 

 

 


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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, August 30, 2014 12:08 AM

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David Swaddle's curator insight, August 31, 2014 7:28 PM

This article got me thinking. It's about transitions in user interface design with some very nice animated examples.

 

Are the transitions shown here useful in a learning context, or are they merely window dressing that detracts from learnability? Personally, I think that while they look nice the first time, most of these transitions become annoying with time, simply delaying users. Mayer and others have shown how eye-candy can often be detrimental to learning.

 

Is it time for some generous academic to re-evaluate the situation in light of recent UX designs, preferably in a corporate setting? Or, maybe somebody already has and some kind soul could post here and point me in the right direction?

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Web & Product Design in Mondrian style [+ @Scenttrail's 1st Web Site circa 1999]

Web & Product Design in Mondrian style [+ @Scenttrail's 1st Web Site circa 1999] | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

Mondrian Grids
First website I created in 1999 used a Mondrian grid. FoundObjects.com had SO MUCH information we needed a grid. Since we sold artist inspired gifts and cool stuff such as Magnetic Poetry Kit I worked hard to write the HTML to create a Mondrian grid manually.

There are "new designer" mistakes such as too many fonts and over selling the click I wouldn't make today, but maybe it was worth figuring out how to write the html to do those lines (took weeks and was named in my divorce lol).

I'm not alone in love for Mondrian as this link shows.

 


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5 Quick Tips About Images & Web Design

5 Quick Tips About Images & Web Design | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

Hard Won Lessons
I spent almost a million dollars of OPM (Other People's Money) learning these five lessons about images and web design, so lessons learned the hard way:

1. Portraits Are Powerful
Portrait images where the model looks directly at the camera, are powerful "welcoming" images great for home, about and category "splash" pages.

2. Babies are DYNAMITE - Use Carefully
Thanks to our ancient caveman brain we can't NOT look at babies. Problem is that is not a secret so babies are now overused to hock insurance, tires and shampoo. If you use a baby my preference is to have the baby looking AT something.

Visitors eyes go where the eyes of people (or babies) are looking, so point your baby image directly at an important Call-to-Action and bet your conversions go up.

3. People Talking To Each Other = DANGEROUS
There may be context where it makes sense for you to have an image where people in the image are huddled together, but I doubt it. If you have two people huddled and a third looking directly out at the camera the image works better.

We respect a huddle. We don't want to intrude, so your web image is working against your online marketing purpose. Your image says we are here having a conversation and YOU (visitor) aren't invited. Not a good idea.

4. People Sell Better Than Widgets, but...
I  prefer to tell human stories even about the most widgety widget, but people bring "like me" problems too. Every visitor is looking for "like me" signals. If you know your archetype and tribe well enough to risk it use images of people consistent with your understanding.

If you have a wide variety of customers and members best to avoid single archetype "like me" images. This is yet another reason I like portraits. Portraits are "universal" meaning the welcoming look directly at the camera removes some of the "must be like me to engage" requirements.

5. In Action Shots Use The MOVEMENT
If your image is riding a bicycle POINT the movement at something important. I don't like movement images as heroes (largest images on a page is called a hero), but I love them in "sub-hero" images because movement creates excitement and allows me to direct the visitor's eyes where we want them to go.

Use these 5 hard won tips and your images won't fight your site's desire to connect, create community and convert visitors into buyers and members.

 

 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Michael Allenberg's insight:

Having spent over a decade as a professional photographer, this is spot on! Of utmost interest to Experience Designers interested in persuasive design methodologies! 

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Time To Go Pageless? 8 Reasons Why Pageless Design is Future of Web Design

Time To Go Pageless? 8 Reasons Why Pageless Design is Future of Web Design | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

Pageless design frees websites from the outdated conventions of print design and fully utilizes the digital platform they’re built on. 

8 Compelling Reasons Why "Pageless' Web Design Wins (in the end):

 

* Tells a better story.

* Easier to "digest" or understand what to do.

* Emotionally more powerful.

* Higher Conversion Rates!!!
* Makes updating faster & easier.

* Lowers BOUNCE & encourages sharing.

* Looks great on all devices (mobile included).

* Lower cost to develop.

Marty Note
I confess to not being in love with the "infinite scroll" just yet. One modification we worked out for @Curagami, our Startup Factory funded startup, is to include a Call-To-Action at the top & Bottom.

CTAs help prepare the scroll. Remember "open book" tests? Putting a CTA on top of a waterfall of content helps prep a visitors mind. It "opens the book" for them. With this many impressive benefits I'm going to have to figure out how to start loving "pageless" design (lol).

I bet there are 5 (or so) similar modifications we can make to help us know how to create the paths and conversion we want by going "pageless".  


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15 Best CSS3 Websites Inspire Consistent With 2014 Design Trends - via AWWards

15 Best CSS3 Websites Inspire Consistent With 2014 Design Trends - via AWWards | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it
Fantastic CSS3 Website Designs for Inspiration. Selection of Awwwards winning CSS3 websites. CSS3 is a powerful tool for web designers to enhance the appearance of a website.

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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, April 23, 2014 8:41 PM

Strong first few pages of examples here. My favs include 

Cat Magnet for actually telling a fish story (nice large CTA too). 
Design Council - love the flat, few colors with red as accent. 

True - don't like blocking the face, but works here. 

Stealable Ideas ae consistent with 2014 design trends:

* Big heros (tells a better story).

* Limit color palette. 
* Flatten out the design so it looks good on mobile too.
* Large Call-to-actions (DECLARE what you want your customers to do).

That last bullet, using a clear CTA, seems to be the hardest one to sell designers who feel to DECLARE is to shout. I disagree. I view DECLARATION in this context as helping by MAPPING and POINTING.

No one wants their TIME wasted and when you point them in the right direction with a large, high contrast CTA you've created a helpful hint. Subtle, when you have seconds, seems an unsupportable luxury. When DON'T we want to be CLEAR and help our visitors know how to journey along our paths?

A: NEVER :). M  

 

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Going Beyond Convention In Website Design - Examples

Going Beyond Convention In Website Design - Examples | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it
Over the past few years, we have gotten used to certain standards in web design. In order to make a lasting impression on your visitors, you need to build experiences that go beyond those of a plain, usable website. This does not mean usability has become any less important. It just takes on a different role in web design, now forming the basis for a great user experience for examples of great usability website.

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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, April 10, 2014 2:47 PM

Agree, some conventions are needed and expected others can be broken down and twisted into new shapes. Trick is knowing what you must do like everyone else and what you can afford to take some risks with in your website design.

massimo scalzo's curator insight, April 12, 2014 3:19 AM

Developing a website goes beyond the simple usability. "Experience" needs also the right attire.... Appearance.  Ease of use is not the only thing important, aesthetics counts too!