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Applying Lean UX | Cooper Journal

Applying Lean UX | Cooper Journal | UX Design | Scoop.it

Don’t be a slave to “The Process.” You’re not trying to be the best at Lean UX, you’re trying to build the best product. There are two rules when it comes to working within Lean, Agile, Waterfall or any process framework:

Rule #1: Know the rules.
Rule #2: Know when to break the rules


Via Mario K. Sakata
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UX Design
The art of designing engaging and meaningful user experiences for customer development.
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Rescooped by Michael Allenberg from Designing design thinking driven operations
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Optimizing the digital and social customer experience

Optimizing the digital and social customer experience | UX Design | Scoop.it
An in-depth overview of why and how to improve the digital and social customer experience across and beyond touchpoints.

Via Fred Zimny
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Rescooped by Michael Allenberg from Emotional Design
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Beyond Usability: Designing Web Sites for Persuasion, Emotion, and Trust :: UXmatters

Beyond Usability: Designing Web Sites for Persuasion, Emotion, and Trust :: UXmatters | UX Design | Scoop.it

For companies and designers, persuasive design changes virtually everything about planning a Web site. Standard usability research and testing are often no longer adequate. Persuasive design is fundamentally more qualitative, deep, and subtle than usability.


Via Alexis Brantes
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Alexis Brantes's curator insight, November 20, 6:10 AM
When we understand the ux as a basic level, our next stet is design for persuasion
Rescooped by Michael Allenberg from digitalNow
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Digital is Just a Means to Reach People...It's How and Why You Use It That Matters

Disruptive technology is just that…it’s disruptive. Every so often, something new comes around and completely upsets the balance. Now, innovation is part of our society and it’s only accelerating. The key to success is to simply accept that this is the end of business as usual. The way that things were done only evolve to accommodate the expectations and preferences of evolved customers and employees.

Via Don Dea
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Don Dea's curator insight, November 15, 2:25 AM

What’s different about your connected customers over your traditional customers?

How are they using technology to make decisions?

What do they search for? What do they ask? Where do they go?

Most importantly…what comes back in their search or what answers are given to their common questions?

Rescooped by Michael Allenberg from International Talent Acquisition Explorer
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How Winning Brands Define Customer Experience

How Winning Brands Define Customer Experience | UX Design | Scoop.it

Although many companies are still struggling to define and measure customer experience (CX), those that spread responsibility for CX across the organization, as well as concentrate on measuring long-term strategies, see a significant jump in sales and revenue, new research reveals.
According to CX Landscape: State of the Industry Report, conducted by Loyalty360, corporate leaders generally realize the importance of customer engagement and CX strategies. But many are unsure how to define customer experience, and because of this, are confused about how to manage it and measure success.
Successful companies "define CX in exhaustive, yet clear measures, use almost twice as many metrics to track CX effectiveness than the rest of the market, and employ short- and long-term metrics to gauge the effectiveness of CX — including complex metrics like ROI and profitability. And perhaps paramount: They include the customer as part of the brand’s reason for being,” Mark Johnson, CEO of Loyalty 360, noted in the report.


Via Alexander Crépin
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Rescooped by Michael Allenberg from Design Revolution
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Bauhaus Web Design

Bauhaus Web Design | UX Design | Scoop.it

Bauhaus is not only one of the most important design movements in history, but an especially relevant style for Web Designers. Alex and Simone tell you why.

Marty Note
Wow, love this post by SitePoint.com's Web Developer Alex Walker and graphic designer Simone Sala because it both EXPLAINS Bauhaus Design Principles and then applies them with examples to the web. #toogood

The Bauhaus stressed form and function. Removing ornamentation in favor of clarity, ease of use and beauty. Sounds like MOBILE DESIGN to me.

Mobile is so SMALL it forces the right choices. Look how "mobile design" is not impacting web design. Mobile stared trends such as limited color palettes and flat graphics because of limitations (of smart phones), but those limitations can also help FREE up a website and point it more clearly at true north.

True north online is where visitors know what to do and why easily and are so engaged by your content they want to do (what you want them to do) AND they want to share the experience with friends. Mobile's "game console-like" BEING is reshaping marketing (see Marketing's Big Bang Manifesto https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/Tf9GNsX35qn ).

Great, helpful post.



Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Design is the Rendering of Intent

Design is the Rendering of Intent | UX Design | Scoop.it

We need to look at our design process as a way to come to a single intention as much as it is to make that intention real in the world. And it’s with the lens of this new definition that we can see we still have much work to do before every design will be a great one.


Via Mario K. Sakata
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The Rise of the Phablet: Designing for Larger Phones

The Rise of the Phablet: Designing for Larger Phones | UX Design | Scoop.it

“Since Samsung created the large-phone market with their Galaxy Note line, people have called these devices phablets because they fill the size gap between traditional mobile phones and small tablets.” - See more at: http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2014/11/the-rise-of-the-phablet-designing-for-larger-phones.php#sthash.jlZMuCwd.dpuf


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Finding New Solutions in Old Philosophy | UX Booth

Finding New Solutions in Old Philosophy | UX Booth | UX Design | Scoop.it

In short, although philosophy cannot provide an algorithm for solving every design problem, it can contribute to UX design. Practitioners can channel the abstractions presented by philosophy into practical principles for real world design.


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Good Design is About Process, not Product

Good Design is About Process, not Product | UX Design | Scoop.it
A designer’s process determines the difference between mediocre and great work. Natural talent and training aren’t substitutes for good design habits. The right process can cover many shortcomings of...

Via Mario K. Sakata
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Fred Zimny's curator insight, November 6, 11:49 PM

Not product, but service is it not?

Rescooped by Michael Allenberg from User Experience - People first
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LukeW | Designing for Large Screen Smartphones

LukeW | Designing for Large Screen Smartphones | UX Design | Scoop.it
LukeW Ideation + Design provides resources for mobile and Web product design and strategy including presentations, workshops, articles, books and more on usability, interaction design and visual design.

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Rescooped by Michael Allenberg from CRM, Analytics, IoE, CX, CIM, & IT, Business Innovation
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Wearable sensor market to expand sevenfold in five years

Wearable sensor market to expand sevenfold in five years | UX Design | Scoop.it

need to desiDriven by rising demand for fitness and health monitoring features as well as by improved user interfaces, shipments of sensors used in wearable electronic devices will rise by a factor of seven from 2013 through 2019, according to IHS Technology....


Via Alama
Michael Allenberg's insight:

We need to design our Experiences to be ubiquitous with the world around us and the world within us... #integratedExperiences

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Lee SCHLENKER's curator insight, October 30, 4:20 AM

According to IHS, the average wearable device shipped in 2019 will incorporate 4.1 sensor elements, up from 1.4 in 2013.

Rescooped by Michael Allenberg from New Customer - Passenger Experience
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Does your #Mobile Strategy match your #Customer behavior?

Does your #Mobile Strategy match your #Customer behavior? | UX Design | Scoop.it

Via Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein
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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, October 28, 1:57 AM

@Forrester report states that only 59% of marketers understand their customers #mobile usage and attitudes.


What do you attribute to be the cause for this lack of understanding?


Is it the need for more advanced #analytics tools to understand customers’ actions so the experience can be optimized?


You should start with a clear customer journey map, in order to define the different touch points and how your customer engages at each point through his/her journey with your brand.

 

Share a recent positive mobile experience or a negative one.


Looking forward to your stories!

Rescooped by Michael Allenberg from Designing design thinking driven operations
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What’s the Next Evolution in Customer Relations? Meet the Customer Experience Team [INFOGRAPHIC]

What’s the Next Evolution in Customer Relations? Meet the Customer Experience Team [INFOGRAPHIC] | UX Design | Scoop.it
Since the Customer Service team is often the sole representative of brands on social media, product feedback or sales opportunities are often left unattended.

Via Fred Zimny
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Rescooped by Michael Allenberg from New Customer - Passenger Experience
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The #Customer #Experience Lessons @Ford

The #Customer #Experience Lessons @Ford | UX Design | Scoop.it
Ford Motor Company took home a silver award in the Customer-Centric Culture category at the inaugural Loyalty360 CX Awards unveiled at the 4th Annual Loyalty360 Engagement & Experience Expo this week in Dallas, TX.
Andrew Ashman, Lincoln Client Experience Manager, Ford Motor Company sat down with Loyalty360 to discuss his company’s fervent push toward a comprehensive customer-centric culture.

Via Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein
Michael Allenberg's insight:

This says it all!

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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, November 14, 3:20 AM

It's great to see a large company like @Ford understanding the importance to adapt the business and respond to the needs of its customers.


- It's start with the right Culture


- Incorporating customers and suppliers input within all strategic decisions


- Empowering employees to delight customers


- Nurture and build strong relationships to drive loyalty.


If you recently purchased or leased a vehicle via Ford or any other car manufacturers, share your experience...

Rescooped by Michael Allenberg from Emotional Design
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Jamie Clouting and Chris Bush, Introducing (PET™) Design Theory; "Persuasion, Emotion and Trust" - YouTube

Jamie Clouting and Chris Bush, Sigma UK, cover the principles of Persuasion Design, or PET™ Theory, as Human Factors International defines the subject. They ...


Via Alexis Brantes
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Alexis Brantes's curator insight, November 14, 12:55 AM

Do you know the principles of Persuasion Design, or PET™ Theory?

Rescooped by Michael Allenberg from Design Revolution
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5 Must Knows BEFORE You Design A Website

5 Must Knows BEFORE You Design A Website | UX Design | Scoop.it

Team Curagami (http://www.Curagami.com ) has, over the course of our combined careers, helped thousands of clients build websites and about 99% have cart before the proverbial horse. "What is our design going to look like," they ask.

Most think "web design" is creating the look and feel of a site. Actually the look and feel, while important, is at least #6 on the "do these things to create a great web presence" list. Here are the first 5 things on that list:

1. Elevator Pitch - Who Are You?
If we were riding in an elevator could you explain your business before we reached your floor? If NO is your answer you are not alone and you need to go back to the drawing board and practice until you have your "elevator pitch" down. All things flow from that defining snippet.

Tags can help define your elevator pitch. Curagami.com Cool Tools For Ecommerce Merchants explains what we do in 5 words. Note that I don't have the the site yet so do as we are saying not as we do (always :).

2. Pain Point - Whose Your Tribe?
We create stuff to DO SOMETHING. Your product or service must help some tribe. Curagami helps ecommerce merchants understand content marketing because finding the balance beam between content that works and content that hurts is a CSF (Critical Success Factor) for ecommerce merchants. So our tribe begins with ecom merchants and we address the PAIN of understanding content marketing. We don't LIMIT ourselves. We don't say, "Go away" to B2B SaaS clients but they are cream on the top of our core tribe and mission.

3. UCA - What Are Your Customers' Aspirations
Unique Customer Aspirations is a metrics we developed as Marketing Director for Atlantic BT. UCA speaks to the transformation your content, product and service creates. Yes Curagami helps merchants make more money, but we also relieve the STRESS of not knowing what to do and why. We help merchants have confidence in their content. No one can build sustainable online community (everyone's master goal whether they know it or not) without being confident in their ability to create, share and curate content. Content is king online and the implications of that statement go far and wide. It's not enough to know your tribes shape you must know their CHARACTER too. Our tribe is STRESSED OVERWHELMED and WORRIED. Anything we do to relieve any of that makes our content sticky and sure to be shared.

4. Know Difference Between Content CREATION and CURATION
Being able to create content is important. We suggest our clients create about 10% of content from unique brand based strings. 90% of the content we want clients to share, discuss and riff off of comes from gurus, customers and THE OTHER. The other is anyone other than you and keeping tabs on your category information, knowing what matters most to your readers and why and understanding the need to tuck ego in back pocket and share competitive information is one of the hardest skills we teach. Web marketing is MOSTLY about THEM not YOU so knowing when you need to blog vs. when you need to comment is key.

5. Know Social Marketing Basics
I'm staying at The Blackwell Inn in Ohio while being treated at Ohio State's James Cancer Center. I've tweeted several positive comments @theBlackwell. Noneof those comments have been ReTweeted and they don't follow me.

ERROR.

My social following dwarfs theirs so breaking the FOLLOW BACK rule hurts 'em. By not picking up my @tweets they discourage such shares and lose the value of that communication (that they actually LISTEN and CARE). I think they do listen and care, but they don't have the skills to do so ONLINE. Before you create a website you need to know what's up in social media.

The Blackwell's lackof knowledge isn't fatal since they are located on Ohio State's campus and are the ONLY such hotel so located. They can SUCK at social media (for a bit) without pain. Doubtful your website, especially if it brand spanking new can afford such a deficit.

Since the master goal of your site is the creation of sustainable online community NOT understanding the implied contracts and un-stated ways social media works can be DEADLY.

Know those 5 things and we can begin to discuss wireframes, look and feel and visual marketing :). Marty

One More Thing - reason this stuff is so important, as my friend Frank Pollock would explain, is the web is a lie detecting amplifier. If you lie it will be shared with the world and known instantly or before, so don't lie. If you are CONFUSED, as many SMBs are, get STRAIGHT before you put crayon to paper and design a site or risk having your confusion being your main message.


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Rescooped by Michael Allenberg from Customer Experience Best Practices & Issues
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The Longest Lasting Emotions In Customer Experience - Forbes

The Longest Lasting Emotions In Customer Experience - Forbes | UX Design | Scoop.it
The Longest Lasting Emotions In Customer Experience. Recent research published in the journal: Motivation and Emotion shows which emotions last the longest and why. We explore what this means for customer service and customer experience leaders.

Via beyondthearc
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Mark Jones's curator insight, November 13, 10:56 AM

Which emotion lasts the longest and whats the impact on the customer experience and probably therefore engagement?

Alexis Brantes's curator insight, November 24, 12:56 PM

Emociones en Forbes :)

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Scroll is the New Click: Captivate Your Users with Parallax

Scroll is the New Click: Captivate Your Users with Parallax | UX Design | Scoop.it
Parallax scrolling offers a better user experience through interaction, engagement, and depth into the story your brand is trying to tell.

Via Mario K. Sakata
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S Shapiro's curator insight, November 11, 8:59 AM

Interesting, but not always implemented well. (And I hate to scroll a lot. It hurts my hand)

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The Architecture of Understanding

Slides from Peter Morville's keynote at NUX3 in Manchester, England.
Michael Allenberg's insight:

The Master of Information Architecture...

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Rescooped by Michael Allenberg from UXploration
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How Google's Material Design is changing things

How Google's Material Design is changing things | UX Design | Scoop.it
  During Apple’s recent conference we were introduced to Yosemite and their decision to move further forward in their flat design 2.0 direction. Having caught ear of the trend earlier on and seeing Microsoft’s success with it over multiple platforms, Apple took it and made it very much their own, introducing opaque windows, clever little …

Via Mario K. Sakata
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Rescooped by Michael Allenberg from New Customer - Passenger Experience
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Do We Care About #Brands?

Do We Care About #Brands? | UX Design | Scoop.it
Most people worldwide would not care if more than 73% of brands disappeared tomorrow. Can people care about brands? If the answer is yes, then what are companies doing wrong?

Via Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein
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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, November 7, 2:07 PM

According to a survey, most people would not care if 73% of the brands would disappear!?


Share your latest experience on what your favorite brands are doing to earn your Loyalty, and ultimately your Advocacy?


It does start with earning your #trust.


Great insight @annettefranz @SDLjames with strong value connections @TOMS @USAA



Fred Zimny's curator insight, November 8, 12:20 AM

Focus on encounters and experiences in stead of managing relations.

Ahmed Alkandari's curator insight, November 15, 9:01 PM

"Most people worldwide would not care if more than 73% of brand disappeared." So, are companies wasting their money on advertisements and marketing; since, most people won't care about weather the brand will disappeared or not?! People who have brand loyalty are supposed to care if the brand they are loyal to will be available or not on the future. Also would these people considered faithful to their brand if they don't care?

What are brands might been doing wrong with customers?

don't focus on the customersare not providing value relative to priceare not providing value relative to the competition/alternativeshave broken customers' trustdon't deliver on their promisesdon't care about customersdon't meet customer expectationsare not innovative (think "same old same old")deliver a fragmented or poor experience

With all of these point, the relationship between them and their customers will be broken. Therefore, companies should focus more on their customers and design a good customer experience. Companies shouldn't only care about making money, they should also care and focus about being a part of something that matters to people and mean something to them.

 

Most of the article was asking questions and some questions didn't have answers in the article, they are open for general thinking and answering. It's interesting about how most people won't care if a brand disappeared on the future; for me I would! Of course life won't stop and new brands will enter the market. However, Some brands people got used to it and can's change that easily; the example of Apple. I also found it important about what they mentioned for customers relationship with the company. In my opinion, companies that focuses more on their relationship with their customers and making sure to build an experience with their customers are more successful than companies that focusses on making profits and increase their revenue. I a customer became loyal to a company and he had an experience with that company, he won't mind paying more on that company's goods. The reason is that the company had built a trust and an experience to that customer so he will be faithful and he would care about the brand and the company.

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Future Of Web Design: End Of Boxes & Borders via @HaikuDeck

Future Of Web Design: End Of Boxes & Borders via @HaikuDeck | UX Design | Scoop.it

Web Design
Cha Cha Changes are ahead for web design. Our social / mobile / connected world is blowing up our wireframes. and that's a good thing.


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Beyond Responsive and Adaptive: Introducing "Adjustive" Web Design

Beyond Responsive and Adaptive: Introducing "Adjustive" Web Design | UX Design | Scoop.it
As technology continues to advance, we need to keep up by optimizing the way we display content. A new concept to help you do just that is "adjustive" Web design.

Via Mario K. Sakata
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4 Pillars of #Customer Empowerment

4 Pillars of #Customer Empowerment | UX Design | Scoop.it
Abandon the linear shopping experience. When the internet was commercialized in the '90s, some executive established the convention of bifurcating promotional efforts. "Marketing" was in charge of driving physical sales. "E-commerce" was in charge of driving digital sales. It was a bad idea then. It's a worse idea today. The reason: Consumers don't shop by channel. They just shop and jump between "omni-channels" as needed. In an omni-channel business, a customer is treated as a single buyer, no matter in which channel he or she is transacting. To become an omni-channel business, companies must forge new lines of communication among business functions and technology applications. Instead of operating as separate business units, departments need to collaborate more or even merge to better engage the new consumer.
Respect customers as individuals. Depending on time, place and channel, customers expect the shopping experience to reflect their immediate circumstance and persona. For example, think of the busy worker with time constraints during the day but greater availability on the weekend who demands different kinds of interactions. The same customer may want to interact differently with a brand on the way home from work versus a weekend morning on the way to the gym. Few companies, however, consider this level of technographic detail when profiling customers. Without it, however, companies cannot optimize their customer interactions; for instance, sending e-mail promotions to customers who instead prefer text messages.
Define your omni-channel goals. Understandably, the rise of the new consumer has caught many companies off guard. Consequently, some pivot prematurely without first determining their business goals and priorities. When asked why they recently launched a multimillion-dollar omni-channel, one company responded, "Everyone else is doing it, so we have to, too." While a company might get lucky without meaningful strategy, it's not a chance worth taking. Businesses need to establish what they are trying to accomplish—gain market share, boost customer acquisitions, drive more value from existing customers, attract more digital traffic, improve online conversion, etc.—and then align their initiatives with those goals. Otherwise, said companies will end up with capabilities that may have minimal, if not zero, impact towards their goals.
Prioritize your touchpoints. After abandoning linear shopping, adopting technographic profiles and prioritizing business goals, omni-channel companies can begin to employ proven touchpoint tactics. These include mobile technologies such as apps and near-field communications. Social platforms that go beyond "likes" and include zeitgeist monitoring, dialog participation and alerting customers to recent purchases made by their peers. It also includes smart Web sites that sell more with virtual showrooms and congruent brick-and-mortar experiences, personalized offers and visionary sales associates who help the customer do their homework, including matching a competitor's price, checking nearby inventory, arranging home delivery or otherwise serving the shopper in a way that isn't available elsewhere. The goal is choosing tactics that prioritize business value.

Via Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein
Michael Allenberg's insight:

A good Experience Designer will seamlessly integrate his designs into the overall Customer Journey, accounting for the pleasantries and pit-falls of the other platforms that he crosses paths with...

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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, October 26, 4:46 PM

Cognizant recognizes the challenges business face in connecting with their consumers. It's time to empower your customers in order to connect and deliver a better brand experience across all channels.


1) Abandon the linear shopping experience.

2) Respect customers as individuals.

3) Define your omni-channel goals.

4) Prioritize your touch points.


While everyone understand the importance to have an omni-channel experience, it starts with setting up clear goals and strategy based on your customer journey.


It's not about what you think your brand, product or service is, but what your customer perceives or experiences it to be. 

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Social Proof in the User Experience

Social Proof in the User Experience | UX Design | Scoop.it
People are guided by other people’s behavior, so we can represent the actions, beliefs, and advice of the crowd in a design to influence users.

Via Mario K. Sakata
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