Expertiential Design
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Expertiential Design
The art of designing engaging and meaningful user experiences for customer development.
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Genius Transitions In User Experience Design - Smashing Magazine

Genius Transitions In User Experience Design - Smashing Magazine | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it
This article looks at some examples of interaction design in which smart interaction, defined by subtle animation, gently improves the user experience. We’ll share some lessons drawn from various models and analyze why these simple patterns work so well.

 

 

 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, August 30, 2014 12:08 AM

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David Swaddle's curator insight, August 31, 2014 7:28 PM

This article got me thinking. It's about transitions in user interface design with some very nice animated examples.

 

Are the transitions shown here useful in a learning context, or are they merely window dressing that detracts from learnability? Personally, I think that while they look nice the first time, most of these transitions become annoying with time, simply delaying users. Mayer and others have shown how eye-candy can often be detrimental to learning.

 

Is it time for some generous academic to re-evaluate the situation in light of recent UX designs, preferably in a corporate setting? Or, maybe somebody already has and some kind soul could post here and point me in the right direction?

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20 Long Form Content Examples with Great UX Design Inspire & Help With the "#newseo"

20 Long Form Content Examples with Great UX Design Inspire & Help With the "#newseo" | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it
Here’s a fun fact: Over the last 10 years, our attention spans have decreased from 12 minutes to 5 minutes. Our ability (and our desire) to read lots of c

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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, June 9, 2014 3:12 PM

My favorite is the NYT's Home and Garden in depth look at 4 square blocks in Philly. Great content daisy chained well so it never overwhelms and keeps readers moving. Great use of anchor links (from the sidebar) makes the piece feel more interactive than it really is. 

Long form content has many #newseo benefits. The more engagement your content creates the greater chances for conversion. Web heuristic measures such as time on site, pages viewed and returning visitors help with the "new seo" too.


Steal some of these easy tricks from NYT and make your content feel more interactive than it is and read faster and more fun so your metrics go up and readers love you enough to become buyers or subscribers.  

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5 Quick Tips About Images & Web Design

5 Quick Tips About Images & Web Design | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it

Hard Won Lessons
I spent almost a million dollars of OPM (Other People's Money) learning these five lessons about images and web design, so lessons learned the hard way:

1. Portraits Are Powerful
Portrait images where the model looks directly at the camera, are powerful "welcoming" images great for home, about and category "splash" pages.

2. Babies are DYNAMITE - Use Carefully
Thanks to our ancient caveman brain we can't NOT look at babies. Problem is that is not a secret so babies are now overused to hock insurance, tires and shampoo. If you use a baby my preference is to have the baby looking AT something.

Visitors eyes go where the eyes of people (or babies) are looking, so point your baby image directly at an important Call-to-Action and bet your conversions go up.

3. People Talking To Each Other = DANGEROUS
There may be context where it makes sense for you to have an image where people in the image are huddled together, but I doubt it. If you have two people huddled and a third looking directly out at the camera the image works better.

We respect a huddle. We don't want to intrude, so your web image is working against your online marketing purpose. Your image says we are here having a conversation and YOU (visitor) aren't invited. Not a good idea.

4. People Sell Better Than Widgets, but...
I  prefer to tell human stories even about the most widgety widget, but people bring "like me" problems too. Every visitor is looking for "like me" signals. If you know your archetype and tribe well enough to risk it use images of people consistent with your understanding.

If you have a wide variety of customers and members best to avoid single archetype "like me" images. This is yet another reason I like portraits. Portraits are "universal" meaning the welcoming look directly at the camera removes some of the "must be like me to engage" requirements.

5. In Action Shots Use The MOVEMENT
If your image is riding a bicycle POINT the movement at something important. I don't like movement images as heroes (largest images on a page is called a hero), but I love them in "sub-hero" images because movement creates excitement and allows me to direct the visitor's eyes where we want them to go.

Use these 5 hard won tips and your images won't fight your site's desire to connect, create community and convert visitors into buyers and members.

 

 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Michael Allenberg's insight:

Having spent over a decade as a professional photographer, this is spot on! Of utmost interest to Experience Designers interested in persuasive design methodologies! 

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Avoid These 8 Deadly Sins of Site Design | Infographic

Avoid These 8 Deadly Sins of Site Design | Infographic | Expertiential Design | Scoop.it
Attracting a potential customer is hard enough. Grabbing their interest and retaining them is even more difficult. It's important to design your site

Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Michael Allenberg's insight:

An info graphic about UX... WIN WIN!!!

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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, November 9, 2013 9:57 AM

Of these 8 very deadly sins the most deadly in my experience is the first one. When customers don't know where you want them to go and what you want them to do or where they came from (within you site) they get confused. Confused customers do many things buying is never one of them.

Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, November 15, 2013 3:53 PM

More on great design for maximum impact. This time, websites.