Biomedical Beat
Follow
Find
2.2K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Centre for Biomedical Research
onto Biomedical Beat
Scoop.it!

Obesity Damages Brain-Stomach Communication

The way the stomach detects and tells our brains how full we are becomes damaged in obese people but does not return to normal once they lose weight, according to new research from the University of Adelaide.
more...
No comment yet.
Biomedical Beat
UVic Centre for Biomedical Research
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chris Upton + helpers
Scoop.it!

CBR: cbr.uvic.ca

CBR:  cbr.uvic.ca | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it

The CBR is a multidisciplinary unit with an emphasis on genetics, molecular biology, and biotechnology. The centre was created to promote interdisciplinary basic and translational biomedical research. Our members span several UVic departments, the UVic Division of Medical Sciences, the Vancouver Island Health Authority and the BC Cancer Agency.

 

This topic will provide general info on a variety health and science related subjects, mirroring the interests of the CBR members.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Centre for Biomedical Research
Scoop.it!

Study Links Genetic Mutation to Melanoma Progression

Study Links Genetic Mutation to Melanoma Progression | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
Researchers have found that the genetic mutation BRAFV600E , frequently found in metastatic melanoma, not only secretes a protein that promotes the growth of melanoma tumor cells, but can also modify the network of normal cells around the tumor to support the disease's progression.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Centre for Biomedical Research
Scoop.it!

Team Finds Ovarian Cancer Oncogene in 'Junk DNA'

Team Finds Ovarian Cancer Oncogene in 'Junk DNA' | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
Over the years researchers have made tremendous strides in the understanding and treatment of cancer by searching genomes for links between genetic alterations and disease. Now, a team of researchers has mined "junk DNA" sequences to identify a non-protein-coding RNA whose expression is linked to ovarian cancer.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Upton + helpers
Scoop.it!

CDC Media Statement on Newly Discovered Smallpox Samples

On July 1, 2014, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) notified the appropriate regulatory agency, the Division of Select Agents and Toxins (DSAT) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), that employees discovered vials labeled ”variola,” commonly known as smallpox, in an unused portion of a storage room in a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) laboratory located on the NIH Bethesda campus.

Chris Upton + helpers's insight:

Oops!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Upton + helpers
Scoop.it!

SimFlu: A simulation tool for predicting the variation pattern of influenza A virus.

SimFlu: A simulation tool for predicting the variation pattern of influenza A virus. | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it

Since the first pandemic outbreak of avian influenza A virus (H5N1 subtype) in 1997, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) has provided a large number of influenza virus sequences with well-organized annotations. Using the time-series sequences of influenza A viruses, we developed a simulation tool for influenza virus, named SimFlu, to predict possible future variants of influenza viruses. SimFlu can create variants from a seed nucleotide sequence of influenza A virus using the codon variation parameters included in the SimFlu package. The SimFlu library provides pre-calculated codon variation parameters for the H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1 subtypes of influenza A virus isolated from 2000 to 2011, allowing the users to simulate their own nucleotide sequences by selecting their preferred parameter options. SimFlu supports three operating systems - Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. SimFlu is publicly available at http://lcbb.snu.ac.kr/simflu.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Upton + helpers
Scoop.it!

Microbes Rule the Waves - 2013: Marine ssDNA viruses are a more diverse group of pathogens than previously thought

Microbes Rule the Waves - 2013: Marine ssDNA viruses are a more diverse group of pathogens than previously thought | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it

This blog is compiled from unedited contributions by undergraduate students of the MBIO322 "Marine Microbiology - Ecology & Applications" module with Plymouth University.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Centre for Biomedical Research
Scoop.it!

Invisibility Cloak for Immune Cells

Invisibility Cloak for Immune Cells | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
The immune system includes natural killer cells (NK cells), which recognize and eliminate tumor or virus-infected cells. NK cells combat the body’s own stressed cells to prevent them from becoming a potential hazard. However, this bears its risks.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Upton + helpers
Scoop.it!

An 81 million year herpes infection: First endogenous herpes virus found!

An 81 million year herpes infection: First endogenous herpes virus found! | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
1– Herpes viruses are old. They are ooooooold. Like, hundreds of millions of years old. Specifically, about 400 million years old. 2– Herpes viruses are everywhere. Fish, reptiles, birds, cows, humans, everywhere. And there are lots of different kinds that humans have to deal with– CMV, EBV, HHV-8, VZV, HSV… 3– And, though herpes viruses should…
Chris Upton + helpers's insight:

If herpes is that old, then what does that tell us about the other Large DNA viruses?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Upton + helpers
Scoop.it!

What is calculus?

What is calculus? | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
Jon Butterworth: A walk past Isaac Newton at the British Library, and an attempt to demystify what is probably the most important tool in the physics 'maths kit'
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Centre for Biomedical Research
Scoop.it!

Unmasking a Viral Invader

Unmasking a Viral Invader | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
Cytomegalovirus, or CMV, is perhaps one of the biggest pathogens you’ve never heard of—big, both proportionately and epidemiologically. If you’re healthy, it’s harmless, but if you have an impaired immune system, the virus can assert itself with a vengeance. Now, researchers have discovered a menu of tactical secrets CMV employs.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Centre for Biomedical Research
Scoop.it!

Researchers Identify Key Mechanism in Metabolic Pathway that Fuels Cancers

Researchers Identify Key Mechanism in Metabolic Pathway that Fuels Cancers | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
In a discovery at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI), a research team has taken a significant step in cracking the code of an atypical metabolic pathway that allows certain cancerous tumors to thrive, providing a possible roadmap for defeating such cancers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Centre for Biomedical Research
Scoop.it!

Immune System's 'Rules of Engagement' Discovered

Immune System's 'Rules of Engagement' Discovered | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
A new study revealed how T cells, the immune system's foot soldiers, respond to an enormous number of potential health threats and found surprising similarities in the way immune system defenders bind to disease-causing invaders.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Centre for Biomedical Research
Scoop.it!

Overcoming Resistance | The Scientist Magazine®

Overcoming Resistance | The Scientist Magazine® | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
In the face of bacterial threats that can evade modern medicines, researchers are trying every trick in the book to develop new, effective antibiotics.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Upton + helpers
Scoop.it!

Viruses spread easily from a single doorknob

Scientists have used special tracer viruses to show that contamination of just a single doorknob can leads to the spread of viruses throughout an entire office building. The idea was to see how easily something unpleasant like norovirus spreads.
more...
Ed Rybicki's curator insight, September 13, 4:50 AM

"Tracer viruses".  They put viruses on a doorknob??  Phages, obviously - and MS2 coliphage, to boot.  I would like to take a look at that ethics application...!

Rescooped by Chris Upton + helpers from Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca
Scoop.it!

ImmunizeCA App - Immunize Canada

ImmunizeCA App - Immunize Canada | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
The Canadian Public Health Association, Immunize Canada and the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute collaborated to develop an app for mobile devices that will help Canadians keep track of their vaccinations. The app is FREE and can be downloaded from iTunes, Google Play of BlackBerry World.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Centre for Biomedical Research
Scoop.it!

Genetic Modifier Impacts Colon Tumor Formation

Genetic Modifier Impacts Colon Tumor Formation | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
Unexpected results from an ongoing experiment in the lab of Kristi Neufeld, Ph.D., co-leader of the Cancer Biology Program, led to a potentially important discovery that could have an impact on how cancer researchers test anti-cancer therapies in mice, and possibly prevent colon cancer in people.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Upton + helpers
Scoop.it!

Evolution and Ecology of Influenza A Viruses.

Wild aquatic bird populations have long been considered the natural reservoir for influenza A viruses with virus transmission from these birds seeding other avian and mammalian hosts. While most evidence still supports this dogma, recent studies in bats have suggested other reservoir species may also exist. Extensive surveillance studies coupled with an enhanced awareness in response to H5N1 and pandemic 2009 H1N1 outbreaks is also revealing a growing list of animals susceptible to infection with influenza A viruses. Although in a relatively stable host-pathogen interaction in aquatic birds, antigenic, and genetic evolution of influenza A viruses often accompanies interspecies transmission as the virus adapts to a new host. The evolutionary changes in the new hosts result from a number of processes including mutation, reassortment, and recombination. Depending on host and virus these changes can be accompanied by disease outbreaks impacting wildlife, veterinary, and public health.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Upton + helpers
Scoop.it!

Google Genomics — Google Developers

Google Genomics — Google Developers | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
Gives access to Google Genomics.

Explore genetic variation interactively.Compare entire cohorts in seconds with SQL-like queries. Compute transition/transversion ratios, genome-wide association, allelic frequency and more.

Chris Upton + helpers's insight:

Generally...   I hate Google...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chris Upton + helpers from Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca
Scoop.it!

▶ Ebola virus explained in 60 seconds (video)

Here's our 60 look at why Ebola is so deadly. The World Health Organization (WHO) has called for "drastic action" to contain an Ebola outbreak in West Africa that has killed nearly 500 people. 
It is the world's largest outbreak in terms of cases, deaths and geographical spread.


Via Ed Rybicki, Chris Upton + helpers
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Centre for Biomedical Research
Scoop.it!

Almonds Can Reduce Heart Disease Risk

Almonds Can Reduce Heart Disease Risk | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
Scientists have found that eating almonds in your diet can reduce the risk of heart disease by keeping blood vessels healthy and significantly increasing the amount of antioxidants in the blood stream.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Upton + helpers
Scoop.it!

PARV4: An Emerging Tetraparvovirus

PARV4: An Emerging Tetraparvovirus | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it

PARV4 was first reported in 2005 in a hepatitis B virus–infected injecting drug user (IDU) [1]. It was detected by a screening process that aimed to identify new DNA viruses in subjects reporting risk factors for HIV combined with nonspecific symptoms of “viral infection syndrome”, including fatigue, malaise, and headache [1].

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chris Upton + helpers from Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca
Scoop.it!

Come for the Oz-kicking, stay for the information

Come for the Oz-kicking, stay for the information | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
This is an excellent piece on that quack, Dr Oz, by John Oliver. The first 5 minutes is spent mocking the fraud, but then, the last ten minutes are all about the real problem: the evisceration of the FDA’s regulatory power over supplements, thanks to Senators Hatch and Harkin. OK, there is a silly bit…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Centre for Biomedical Research
Scoop.it!

Obesity Research Takes Aim at Protein Regulators

Obesity Research Takes Aim at Protein Regulators | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
You are what you eat, but researchers are beginning to realize that what and when you eat is controlled by a myriad of underlying biological triggers acting in concert.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Centre for Biomedical Research
Scoop.it!

Alzheimer’s, Other Conditions Linked to Prion-like Proteins

Alzheimer’s, Other Conditions Linked to Prion-like Proteins | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
A new theory about disorders that attack the brain and spinal column has received a significant boost from scientists. The theory attributes these disorders to proteins that act like prions, which are copies of a normal protein that have been corrupted in ways that cause diseases.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Chris Upton + helpers from Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca
Scoop.it!

An Apple a Day, and Other Myths

An Apple a Day, and Other Myths | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
The gap grows between food folklore and science on cancer.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Centre for Biomedical Research
Scoop.it!

MRSA Genome Predicts Toxicity

MRSA Genome Predicts Toxicity | Biomedical Beat | Scoop.it
The spread of the antibiotic-resistant pathogen MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) remains a concerning public health problem, especially among doctors trying to determine appropriate treatment options for infected patients. Bacterial pathogens, such as MRSA, cause disease in part due to toxicity, or the bacterium's ability to damage a host's tissue.
more...
No comment yet.