History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum
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History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum
This site has been created especially for Early Stage 1 and Stage 1 teachers although most resources could be adapted to other Stages. It is a collection of  digital resources for teaching History and Geography that includes both student and teacher resources. Resources are current and incorporate Indigenous, Intercultural and Global Perspectives. Comments and annotations are under development. Please add your comments.
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Rescooped by Alexis King from Geography Stage 1: People's Connections to places
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Meaning of land to Aboriginal and Torrest Strait Islander peoples

Meaning of land to Aboriginal and Torrest Strait Islander peoples | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it
Land means different things to non-Indigenous and Aboriginal people. The latter have a spiritual, physical, social and cultural connection.Land management and care are vital for Aboriginal health and provide jobs.Many Aboriginal artworks tell about the connection between people and their land.

Via Jenny Ng
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Stage 1 Geography
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Jenny Ng's curator insight, March 22, 8:16 AM
Links to curriculum: Stage 1 People and Places 
 - GE1-1: Describe features of places and connections people have with places.

Content Descriptors: 
- Investigate connections that people, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, have to local places such as their land. 

 Please note: 
 *Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are advised that the following media resource may contain images and voice of people who have died* 

Resource description/Evaluation: 

The ‘Meaning of Land to Aboriginal People’ page within the ‘Creative Spirits’ website is a great teacher resource. It includes factual information, Aboriginal peoples’ perspectives through quotes, and video interviews in regards to their connection to land. Its suitability is based on the ‘Selection Criteria for the Evaluation of Aboriginal Studies and Torres Strait Islander studies’ (Queensland Studies Authority, 2007).

The resource: 
- Up-to-date 
-materials are accurate and relevant 
- Videos and photographs are accompanied by captions of the Aboriginal persons and where they came from, showing a wider understanding of the significance of ancestors and elders in the Aboriginal community.
- Does not misrepresent, perpetuate stereotypes or any racist connotations reflecting its 'appropriateness'.
- This website is also further acknowledged and supported by Indigenous communities and Aboriginal individuals (NSW DET, 2003, p. 17). 

Teaching Idea:
- Begin with a whole class discussion with an open-ended question. This is because according to McGlathery (1978) it encourages high order. For example “What do you think a person means when they say the are connected to their land?”. 

- Then as a class view the video within the ‘Meaning of Land to Aboriginal People’ page: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w0sWIVR1hXw&feature=youtu.be

- After watching this video teachers and students need to discuss and explicate on the information presented in the clip. Use Kagan’s (1989) ‘Think-pair-Share’ co-operative learning strategy where students would work in pairs to think and share their responses for the following questions: 

Q1) What do we now know about Aboriginal people and their connection to land? 
Q2) How do Aboriginal people feel connected to their land?

After the discussion, regroup as a class and discuss the ideas shared between the students. This will allow the classroom teacher to informally assess their student’s level of understanding about the topic at hand.


Reference:

Kagan, S. (1989). Cooperative learning: Resources for teachers. San Juan Capistrano, CA.

McGlathery, G. (1978). Analyzing the questioning behaviors of science teachers. What research says to the science teacher, 63 (1). pp. 13-30.

New South Wales Department of Education and Training. (2003). Aboriginal Education K-12:Resource Guide. Sydney: Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate NSW DET.

Queensland Studies Authority. (2007). Selecting and Evaluating Resources: Guidelines. Retrieved from Queensland Curriculum & Assessment Authority website: https://www.qcaa.qld.edu.au/downloads/approach2/indigenous_g008_0712.pdf
Rescooped by Alexis King from Resources for teaching Stage 1 Geography: People and places
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3D Geography - helping with the teaching and learning of Geography.

3D Geography - helping with the teaching and learning of Geography. | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it
Fun ideas for learning about Geography for kids. Packed with lots of information, geography model ideas, activities and geography worksheets to help you learn.

Via Miranda Li
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Stage 1 Geography
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Miranda Li's curator insight, April 2, 7:40 PM
This website can be used by students when studying the country of Australia and the places located within it. The resource offers a range of information about Australia including its location at a global scale as well as fun facts about the country. Through using this site, syllabus content requiring Stage 1 students to investigate about Australian places and Australia's location based on the inquiry question "Where are places located in Australia?" will be effectively covered. Students may also download maps and images of Australia from the web resource to use as a learning resource. Hurley et al. (1999) highlights that through using internet-based resources in geography education, a collaborative learning environment where students are able to access communicative tools and expanded resources that will increase their geographical understanding. 

Additionally, teachers may ask students to perform a research project where they can use this website as a digital resource to obtain their information. This can be done in groups or individually and students may present their findings to the class. Another useful resource to further students' research and understanding on the geographical position of Australia include Google Earth (See link below). The implementation of geographic information science based applications such as Google Earth as part of students' understanding will increase students' critical thinking, analysis, inquiry skills and overall geographical awareness (Patterson, 2007). There are also a number of videos about Australia that can be viewed by students during free time as well as quizzes that can be completed by students to test their knowledge on Australia's states. Additionally, there are also worksheets that can be downloaded to aid students' learning of Australia including an atlas guide to finding various places located in Australia, fact sheet guide on Australia etc. Overall, this is a simple and fun digital resource where students can begin to explore their geographical understanding and knowledge on the country of Australia.

Resources:

References:
Hurley, J. M., Proctor, J. D., & Ford, R. E. (1999). Collaborative inquiry at a distance: Using the Internet in geography education. Journal of Geography, 98(3), 128-140.

Patterson, T. C. (2007). Google Earth as a (not just) geography education tool. Journal of Geography, 106(4), 145-152.
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Read Aloud: On the Same Day in March (by Marilyn Singer and Frane Lessac) 

"Singer and Lessac embark on a meteorological trip around the globe, pointing out the drastically different weather conditions that can occur in various places, all on the same day. From the Arctic to the Texas Panhandle, Northern Kenya and all the way down to Antarctica, readers trek across both hemispheres, checking out snow, ice, fog, clouds, sun and heat."

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Stage 1 Geography- weather and seasons
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Mikayla Leigh's curator insight, March 20, 9:54 PM
‘On The Same Day In March’ is the perfect book for students when learning to make a “comparison of the daily and seasonal weather patterns of places” (Board of Studies, Teaching and Educational Standards [BOSTES], 2015). The poetic language and use of rhyme makes the language of the book fun and accessible to students, and the use of the video as a teaching tool engages students with the text (Wall, Higgins & Smith, 2005). Teachers could easily incorporate this book in a number of literacy activities as this book study is perfect pairing to a unit on weather and helps students see that weather can be vastly different around the world even on the same day. 

For example, prior to first reading of book, or viewing of the video, show students a globe and explain the book you will be reading will show different places all over the world. Explain that a globe is a model of the Earth. If you were way up in space looking down, this is what the Earth would look like. Maybe even ask a volunteer to come up the front and point out where they are on the globe so they can gage a sense of place. This introduction emphasizes text participant practices in the ‘before reading’ section to activate prior knowledge about both the genre of the book and its content (Callow & Hertzberg, 2006).

Try to read the text with minimal interruptions; only stopping occasionally to provide word meanings or clarify when you know the majority of the students will be confused. The goal here is for students to enjoy the book, both writing and pictures, and to experience it as a whole. Students may recognize some of the areas such Darwin Australia, and this helps to make the text more relatable to their own lives. This is important if students are to engage with the story and understand the key concepts behind it (Seely Flint, Kitson, Lowe & Shaw, 2014).

During the second reading of the book it might be a good idea to stop every now and again to discuss words or phrases that may cause some confusion for students, such as “that wild Chinook blows like a dragon” (Singer & Leesac, 2001, p.2). It might be a good idea to start a chart or a list of words, either on a piece of butchers paper or on the smartboard, of these words and phrases to revisit later or to document their meaning. More extensive activities could be developed after the initial understanding of the book is achieved.

References: 
Board of Studies, Teaching & Educational Standards NSW. (2015). Syllabus: Geography K-10. NSW, Australia: Author. 

Callow, J., & M., Hertzberg. (2006). Helping children learn to read. In R. Ewing (Ed.), Beyond the reading wars. Newtown, N.S.W.: PETAA

Seely Flint, A., Kitson, L., Lowe, K., & Shaw, K. (2014). Literacy in Australia: Pedagogies for engagement. Milton, Q.L.D.: John Wiley and Sons Australia.

Singer, M., & Leesac, F. (2001). On the same day in March: A tour of the world’s weather. Logan, USA: Perfection Learning Corporation.

Wall, K., Higgins, S., & Smith, H. (2005). ‘The visual helps me understand the complicated things’: pupil views of teaching and learning with interactive whiteboards. British Journal of Educational Technology, 36(5), 851-867.
Rescooped by Alexis King from Stage 1 Geography: People and Places
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TravelBUGs - About Travelbugs

TravelBUGs - About Travelbugs | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it

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Stage 1 Geography
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Jasmine Chan's curator insight, April 9, 9:30 AM
Outcome: 
- connections people have with places GE1-1 
Inquiry question: What factors affect people’s connection to places? 

Give the opportunity for students to travel the world and meet people all around the world in the classroom-all you need is a Travelbugs passport! TravelBugs is a fun interactive learning site for students who are aiming to learn about different countries in the world, igniting their interest on why people visit other places and their connections with other countries across the world. The Australian Curriculum states the importance of intercultural understanding and research in the United Kingdom and Australia affirms that students can have stereotyped views other countries at an early age (ACARA, 2011, p. 10). This resource will be successful in challenging and shifting their stereotypes. 

Teaching ideas: This resource includes a range of interactive activities; including learning games, country comparison, creating articles, photo albums with annotations and travel diaries. Through these fun activities, students can build their interest and knowledge about other countries, especially Asia. The Melbourne Declaration elucidates the necessity for Australian students to be ‘Asia literate’ (MCEETYA, 2008, p. 4). The focus on Asia is reinforced in ‘Goal 2: All young Australians become successful learners, confident and creative individuals, and active and informed citizens’, where students are expected to be able tor relate to and communicate across cultures, especially cultures of Asia (MCEETYA, 2008, p. 9). In the game ‘Mystery Suitcase’, travellers pack a suitcase with a range of items and students have to guess the origin of the suitcase owner and their reason for travel. This allows students to explore the reasons for travel such as emigration, refugees, holidays, work and education. After this, students can write in the ‘Travel Diary’ about the country that appeared on the previous game through research. It can be assessed by peer assessment where students check each other’s travel diaries. This task provides a geographical inquiry approach to learning as it builds on what students already know and moves onto discussion and reflection (Taylor, 2012, p. 127). 

References: 

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2011). The shape of the Australian curriculum: geography. Sydney, NSW. Retrieved 8th April, 2016 from http://www.acara.edu.au/verve/_resources/shape_of_the_australian_curriculum_geography.pdf ;

Ministerial Council on Education, Training, Employment and Youth Affairs. (2008). Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians. (1st ed.). Retrieved 8th April, 2016 from http://www.curriculum.edu.au/verve/_resources/National_Declaration_on_the_Educational_Goals_for_Young_Australians.pdf ;

Taylor, T. (2012). Introduction to Inquiry- based learning. In Taylor, Fahey, Kriewaldt & Boon. Place and Time. Explorations in Teaching Geography and History. Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia.
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Source 2: DIY Australian Passport - Student's can travel the world even in your classroom!

Source 2: DIY Australian Passport - Student's can travel the world even in your classroom! | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it
Summary: This document can be used to provide students with their very own Australian Passport.  It can be used to support many learning areas and activities within the classroom. Firstly, it can be used as a behaviour management system. Students can receive a stamp for good behaviour and when their passport is full they may

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Amelia Laumberg's curator insight, April 9, 7:11 PM
This second resource is both educational and entertaining for Year 2 students. The teacher can print the passports, as well as a photo of each student and these passports can be stamped after each country they ‘visit’. A whole series of lessons could be dedicated to travelling around the world and learning about different countries. This resource would directly relate to learning about Australia’s location in the world (BOSTES, 2012). It is important to learn about the world and then focus in on Australia to gain a deeper understanding of the country the students are living it. 

This task would allow students to learn about the continents and oceans that surround Australia. It will develop students’ geographical understanding as they will now be aware of Australia’s place in the world and what surrounds us. By using this resource, students will acquire the skill of knowing about other countries and where they are positioned in the world. For more information on how this resource can be used in the classroom, please follow the link of the scoop.

Reference:
Board of Studies NSW. (2012). Geography K-10 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.
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Source 4: A shared history - Aboriginal perspectives - Introduction to maps

Source 4: A shared history - Aboriginal perspectives - Introduction to maps | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it

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Dave Baker's curator insight, April 13, 2014 12:07 PM

Having established some key concepts about maps and globes, we can now use them to gain insight into our world.

 

These maps of Aboriginal nations/language groups help form the core of the aboriginal perspective in schools (Queensland Government, 2007) They are present in city, state and country scales. They show the diversity of Aboriginal culture. A map is a really powerful tool to demonstrate this point. The national scale can be used to see the breadth of diversity, and attention can be drawn to the Torres Strait Islands as well. At the city level, the city map could be displayed on a smart board with a general map of Sydney overlayed. This could be used by the students to determine which aboriginal culture is connected to the land that the school is on, and if different, where their homes are as well. Students could then be guided to finding out information on that culture. Some links to websites for specific culture are in the resource, but many are no longer functioning.

The map could also be used to in a series of comparisons to demonstrate various points. It could be compared to a state map of Australia to demonstrate how maps can change over time as different people use/possess the land differently. The maps will help prepare students to understand that terra nullius was a false concept.

The map could also be used to compare to Europe. The size and number of nations and languages could be compared to further highlight the diversity of Aboriginal cultures.

 

Queensland Government. (2007). Selecting and evaluating resources: Guidelines, Indigenous perspectives. Brisbane, Queensland Studies Authority

G. Liang's curator insight, April 5, 9:08 AM

This is an excellent teaching resource which engages students with quality and accurate information of ATSI peoples. The Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs believes that “it is important that all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students are taught by high quality teachers in schools led by effective and supportive principals who are assisted by world class curriculum that incorporates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives” (MCEEDYA, 2010, p. 22). This curriculum support resource achieves this through being consulted with Aboriginal educators; having input from contemporary ATSI peoples in participation and being accurate and supported by the Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate (DET NSW, 2003). This resource also incorporates the geographical tool of maps. 


Teaching Idea:

- Dave’s teaching idea of using the IWB to look at the map to demonstrate the diversity of Aboriginal culture is excellent. 

- To add on to this idea, by specifically looking at how their school ground is connected with ATSI communities allows students to recognize that “land and country are embedded within a totality of a person, spirit and country” and that their connection to the place of Australia is inherent (Taylor, 2012, p. 62). 

- Students can then further conduct geographical inquiry through exploring the NSW Interactive map that their school is on, and using the ‘List of Aboriginal Nations of NSW’ link and the internet to research further into the geographical inquiry about where these nations are today and their contemporary recognition of land ownership. Through conducting this research about traditional owners of the Australian country, students “re-examine evidence and assumptions” and “shake up habitual ways of working and thinking, to dissipate conventional familiarities and re-evaluate rules and institutions” about the current state of affairs (Foucault, 1996, p. 462, as cited in Taylor, 2012, p. 54). 


References:

New South Wales Department of Education and Training. (2003). Aboriginal Education K-12: Resource Guide. Sydney: Professional support and Curriculum Directorate NSW DET. 


Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs. (2008). Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians. Melbourne: Author. 


Taylor, T. (2012). Introduction to Inquiry- based learning. (Chapter 4). In Taylor, Fahey, Kriewaldt & Boon. Place and Time. Explorations in Teaching Geography and History. Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia. p. 54-62

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National Geographic Society- Create a Weather Map

National Geographic Society- Create a Weather Map | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it
Students draw pictures that symbolize different types of weather and then use information about today's weather to make their own state weather map.

Via Shirley Chen
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Stage 1 Geography. Weather
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Shirley Chen's curator insight, April 10, 12:32 AM
Teacher resource!

This resource involves students drawing pictures that symbolise different types of weather and then using the information about today’s weather to make their own weather map (National Geographic Society, 2016). Although the resource was created for teachers in the US, I have adapted the lesson plan ideas to make it suitable for Australian teachers and students. 

A lesson begins with a whole class discussion where the teacher asks questions such as: 
• What’s the weather like today?
• How do the clothes we wear change based on the weather and temperature?

Teacher should explain that the weather is not just outside their window but also in places far away to develop the geographical concept of place by beginning to expand the child’s thinking of place to encompass locations they may never experience directly (Kriewaldt, 2012, p. 18). 

Show students a weather report on the news. An example is 
This weather forecast includes New Zealand, thus showing students each country has its own weather forecast.

After students have viewed the video, pause on the map of Australia with the weather forecast for the major cities. Ask students to discuss in pairs what they think the numbers and pictures on the map represent. Afterwards, the teacher would ask for feedback from the whole class and give an explanation about what is shown on this weather map. 

Students could then fill out a two column chart. In the left column, have students write the words (sunny, cloudy, sunny with possible showers, rain and thunderstorms). In the right column, have them draw a picture that symbolises each type of weather. http://media.education.nationalgeographic.com/assets/file/Two_Column_Chart.pdf

Give students a map of Australia, retrieved from http://library.unimelb.edu.au/__data/assets/image/0006/1046085/aust-c-m.gif

Students make up their own weather map by drawing pictures that symbolise different types of weather next to each of the major cities. For extension, students write appropriate minimum and maximum temperatures next to each of the cities according to their weather symbols. 

References: 
Kriewaldt, J. (2012). Why geography matters (Chapter 2). In Taylor, Fahey, Kriewaldt & Boon. Place and Time, Explorations in Teaching Geography and History. Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia. 

National Geographic Society (2016). Create a Weather Map. Retrieved April 9, 2016 from http://education.nationalgeographic.org/activity/create-weather-map/ ;

Sky NEWS (2016). National Forecast. Retrieved April 10, 2016 from http://www.skynews.com.au/video/weather/weather1/2016/04/08/national-forecast0.html
Rescooped by Alexis King from Digital Resources for Stage 1 Geography
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RESOURCE 3: Welcome to Country: Australian Indigenous Language Groups and Cultural Protocols on the App Store

Read reviews, compare customer ratings, see screenshots and learn more about Welcome to Country: Australian Indigenous Language Groups and Cultural Protocols. Download Welcome to Country: Australian Indigenous Language Groups and Cultural Protocols and enjoy it on your iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.

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Welcome to Country explained.

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Yeonji Lee's curator insight, April 8, 12:49 AM
Important Advice: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are advised that this app may contain images and voices of people who have died.

This free application is accessible to all as it can be downloaded onto any IOS device. It would be ideal for the teacher to have the application downloaded onto school iPads prior to the lesson where students investigate and discuss how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples' portray their connection to the land (BOSTES, 2015).

Students may use the application as a starting point to investigate about: 'Welcome to Country'  and how it displays connection to the land. Simultaneous to gaining knowledge about the 'Welcome to Country', Google Maps featured on the application allows students to interpret geographical information (where in Australia each tribe is located) displayed on a geographical tool (map). Students can lead their own inquiry based learning (Taylor, 2012) by searching where the place is located within Australia. ABC's map of Aboriginal Australia (http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/map/) can be used as an additional resource to learn about the geo-boundaries of each tribe. The collaboration of the two maps, Google Maps and ABC's map, is highly appropriate to develop geographical understandings of where places are located because maps are essential in geography as it offers a visual representation of where places are located (Liben and Roger, 2011).

Over the last decade, there has been an emphasis to integrate the perspective of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people's culture, ways of life, language and experiences in the curriculum (ACARA, 2013). However, teachers must carefully select their resources as some may inaccurately represent the Indigenous people and their way of life. Whilst the chosen application is not perfect, still missing some Welcome to Country videos, it checks many of the criteria outcomes stated in The Selection Criteria for the Evaluation of Aboriginal Studies and Torres Strait Islander Studies (Craven, 1969) and thus is deemed as an appropriate resource for Stage 1 students. 

The resource is not only authentic as there is Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander participation but also does not stereotype and and make racist remarks about the Indigenous people.
- The material is up to date: first published on July 31 2015 and last updated on 19 Febuary 2016. 
- The photographs and videos published are positive and accurate portrayals of Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islander people. In addition, every Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander featured in the video introduces themselves (name, where they are from) to the audience.
-The diversity of both Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal languages and cultures are respected as there is a clear differentiation between tribes and even denotes different spelling of each tribe. e.g Cadigal/Gadigal 


Reference:
ACARA. (2013). Cross-Curriculum Priorities. Retrieved April 8, 2016 from http:/www.acara.edu.au/assessment.html

BOSTES (2015). Geography K-10 Syllabus. Retrieved 5th April, 2016 from http://syllabus.bostes.nsw.edu.au/assets/geographyk10/downloads/geographyk10_full.pdf

Craven, R. (1969). The Selection for the Evaluation of Aboriginal Studies and Torres Strait Islander Studies.

Liben, Lynn S., and Roger M. Downs. "Geography for young children: Maps as tools for learning environments." Psychological perspectives on early childhood education: Reframing dilemmas in research and practice (2001): 220-252.

Taylor, T. (2012). Introduction to Inquiry Based learning. (Chapter 8). In Taylor, Fahey, Kriewaldt & Boon. Place and Time. Explorations in Teaching Geography and History. Frenchs Forest Pearson Australia. 


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Gulumoerrgin Seasonal Calendar - Larrakia, Darwin

Gulumoerrgin Seasonal Calendar - Larrakia, Darwin | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it
Traditional knowledge can tell us much about the ecology of northern Australia. Members of the Gulumoerrgin (Larrakia) language group are from the Darwin region in the Northern Territory. The Gulumoerrgin seasonal year is divided into seven main seasons.

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Geography Stage 1 - Indigenous seasons - NT
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Julia H's curator insight, April 3, 5:25 PM

This interactive version of the Indigenous seasonal calendar is a great online educational resource for students when learning about “how different cultural groups, including Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Peoples, describe weather, seasons, or seasonal calendars” (BOSTES, 2015, p.41). It provides detailed information about the seven annual seasons that make up the seasonal calendar of the Larrakia people of the Darwin region in the Northern Territory, and allows students to learn more about the local landscape and environment. Such a resource is easily accessible and engaging for students through the vivid images, facts and audio commentary. 


This interactive calendar and the relevant website, developed by CSIRO and Larrakia traditional owners, fulfils the selection criteria for a good quality resource in that it is authentic, balanced and acknowledges Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participation (Craven, n.d.). For example, authenticity of the resource is ensured as the information was contributed and written by Aboriginal peoples, including Gulumoerrgin/Larrakia language contributors. The material has also been acknowledged by several Aboriginal persons including Lorraine Williams, a member of the Larrakia language group, who provides an audio commentary of acknowledgements. 


There is a balanced nature of the presentation in that the website has a page link to other Indigenous seasonal calendars and project contributors clearly note that the seasonal calendar reflects the beliefs and culture of the Larrakia people. By doing this, it recognises that the seasonal calendar may be different for other Indigenous peoples around Australia, hence it values the “diversity and complexity of cultures” (Craven, n.d., p.14).


Teaching Ideas: 

Prior to students using the online seasonal calendars, have a class discussion about the way Indigenous people around the world pass on information. Explain what a seasonal calendar is and its purpose (e.g. a method for passing on information that is important to a particular group of people). 


• Print a seasonal calendar template, use butcher’s paper or a large cork board and place this on a wall in the classroom. Create a seasonal calendar based on the Larrakia seasonal calendar to observe the changes in the seasons and associated plants and wildlife. Students can write descriptive sentences, collect objects and take photographs of the local area/environment that describe the seasons and environmental indicators for those seasons. Add these to the calendar progressively throughout the school year. 


References: 

Board of Studies, Teaching & Educational Standards NSW. (2015). Geography k-10 syllabus. NSW, Australia: Author.



Craven, R. (n.d.). The selection criteria for the evaluation of Aboriginal studies and Torres Strait Islander studies. Retrieved 4 April, 2016 from file:///C:/Users/ewan/Downloads/The_Selection_Criteria_for_the_Evaluation_of_Abor.pdf



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Scoop 1: TES iboard Activity - What's the Weather?

Scoop 1: TES iboard Activity - What's the Weather? | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it
An open-ended activity to support weather topics.

Via Miki Kanai
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Year 1 Geography Weather
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Miki Kanai's curator insight, April 10, 12:58 AM
This resource by TES Australia is a simple yet fun and effective IWB activity, appropriate for stage 1 students. 

A great suggestion for its use in a classroom, is to open this up on the IWB at the beginning of each day, for students to involve themselves in open discussions about the weather on that day. By putting it up on the IWB, students can move around different features on the screen using their fingers, what the environment will be looking like, what the children should be wearing, etc, on a particular day with a particular weather. Discussions can include what the appropriate type of clothing is for the day and why, what kind of leisure activities can be taken, as well as what kind of actions may be necessary (e.g. drink lots of water on a hot day, stay inside if there’s a storm outside). 

This type of interactive resource allows for a multi sensory learning experience for students to take in place (Tayloe et al, 2012), where they are given the opportunities to not only enjoy partaking in the activity itself, but also enabling them to connect to the topic at a personal level, essentially linking learning with real life experiences.


Reference: 
Taylor, Fahey, Kriewaldt & Boon. (2012). Place and Time. Explorations in Teaching Geography and History. Frenches Forest: Pearson Australia.
Hannah Morton's curator insight, April 13, 2:27 AM
Springboard for conversations about weather observations for students in the early years.
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Teachers - Australian Organic Schools

Teachers - Australian Organic Schools | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it
Australian Organic Schools helps you to create a school garden & educate about the benefits of organic food & practices. Full teaching resources included.

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ES1 Geography
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Tegan Wickenden's curator insight, April 10, 6:13 PM
The Australian Organic Schools website is a fantastic resource for teachers, students and parents to learn about organic gardening, organic farming, and the organic industry and how these benefit the environment. 

• There are curriculum-aligned resources for teachers to use and there is information and videos about building an organic school garden, including examples of what other schools have done. 

• Creating an organic garden with your class is an effective way of allowing students to interact with the environment around them. The website can be used to prepare yourself and your students. The videos demonstrating garden projects in other schools are especially helpful and appropriate for Early Stage 1. The website is an effective resource to inspire class discussions and planning and to “develop a sense of awe and wonder, a background of aesthetic awareness and a framework of ethical consideration” (Rowley, 2006, p.17). 

• Early Stage 1 students may find it difficult to navigate and read the information on the website, so this can be done as a class on the Smart Board. 

References: 

Rowley, C. (2006). Are there different types of geographical enquiry? In H. Cooper, C. Rowley & S. Asquith (Eds.), Geography 3-11: A guide for teachers. London: David Fulton.
Rescooped by Alexis King from Stage 1 Geography - Aboriginal Australian connections between people and places
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Draw On Maps and Make Them Easily.From www.scribblemaps.com - Today

Draw On Maps and Make Them Easily.From www.scribblemaps.com - Today | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it
Easily Create and Share Maps. Share with friends, embed maps on websites, and create images or pdf.

Via Lizzie James
Alexis King's insight:
Year 1 Geography
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Lizzie James's curator insight, April 10, 4:33 PM
Scribble maps is free and highly compatible. It can be used on any device with internet. It can be used on iPads or can be added as an extension to google chrome. The purpose of this resource is for students to have the tool to create their own maps. This scoop.it topic has been focused on how to develop students' understanding of connections between people and places, specifically Aboriginal Australian connections. With Scribble maps students can visually annotate maps to represent the ideas they have learnt about what makes places so special to them or to another relevant culture. 
Students can use this resource to visually communicate a range of things such as connectedness, cultural purpose, personal purpose, favourite places. Free features include being able   to draw radiuses around any given point, create drop pins, label, flight paths, draw on the map, create lines, insert icons, and place image overlays of any photo. 
This tool is an excellent base for an assessment as children are free to create their own special map while referencing real places through google maps and satellite images. When students create their own maps they can share personal meanings or meanings that they have discovered behind connections to places.
Rescooped by Alexis King from CUES1 - Groups that individuals belong to
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Celebrating a First Birthday in Vietnam

Celebrating a First Birthday in Vietnam | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it

Teaching children that other group's in the community celebrate the same events as you but in a different way!


Via Danielle Connon
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Danielle Connon's curator insight, April 9, 2015 5:24 AM

UNIT QUESTION: HOW ARE WE DIFFERENT AND HOW ARE WE THE SAME?
 

HSIE

STAGE: ES1

OUTCOME: CUES1: Communicates some common characteristics that all people share, as well as some of the differences – Identities – Cultural Diversity.

SUBJECT MATTER: Groups that individuals belong to (with a focus on cultural groups).

LINKS TO SUBJECT MATTER:

-       Family origins, including country of birth

-       Family languages

-       Events and stages in their lifetimes

-       Special events they celebrate

-       Events shared with class members and with families

LINKS TO OTHER KLA:

-       English

 

MAIN TEACHING POINT: Lots of different cultural groups celebrate differently all over Australia and in other countries.  

 

Teaching Strategy: Teacher will need to set a task prior to undertaking this lesson that involves students bringing in a photo from home of their First Birthday celebrations (or other any other early Birthday) and a few facts about what they did on the day. This is excellent because Piaget believed young children have egotistical mindsets and thus need assistance to see viewpoints of others (Kohler & Bailey, 2014, p.77).

 

Teacher will create “interactive documentation” (Visible Thinking, 2015) by sticking up images to help students categorise the main aspects of the celebration (food, clothes, cake, family, presents).

Students to draw a picture of Samantha’s Vietnamese Birthday celebrations on a marked half a page and focus on the main aspects that were discussed as a class. Students will then be required to write a short piece about their First Birthday (work samples may vary from a few words to multiple sentences). Discussion should occur surrounding any differences and similarities between their Birthday and Samantha’s. Through employing a backwards design process this online resource is able to address this particular topic effectively. 

 

Assessment Strategy: McTighe & Wiggins formulated the six facets of understanding and the first facet involves seeing things in relation to one another which ES1 students are capable of doing (2005, p.12). Therefore, teacher should assess student’s understanding of the main point through collecting work samples and analysing student’s understanding of Vietnamese traditions as well as their own and their ability to compare the two. Although, Gilbert & Hoepper argue that collection of work samples must occur overtime to assess a student’s growing understanding of a topic (2014, p.109).

 

Literacy Strategy: Students will be simultaneously addressing ENe-2A “composes simple texts to convey an idea or message” (BOSTES, 2012, para. 1) through using pictures and words to represent meaning. Perhaps to assist student’s in their writing Birthday-related words such as ‘food’ could comprise the spelling list that week as they will be “using some sight words and known words” (BOSTES, 2012, para. 3).

 

REFERNCE LIST

BOSTES. (2015). English k-10 syllabus. Retrieved from NSW Department of Education and Communities website: http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/english/english-k10/
 

Kohler, R., & Bailey, R. (2014). Early psychological work. In Jean piaget (1st ed., pp. 63-99). Retrieved from http://usyd.eblib.com.au.ezproxy1.library.usyd.edu.au/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1729574&echo=1&userid=58%2fd9oqmbEbw12XcrFzYrA%3d%3d&tstamp=1428299362&id=DC46A5ABD1C4F957D80D5C5BFAFC563381497439
 

Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching humanities and social sciences (5th ed.). R. Gilbert (Ed.). South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage learning.

 

McTighe, J., & Wiggins, G. (2005). Understanding by design handbook. Association for supervision and curriculum development, 7-19, 28-30, 37-43. Retrieved from http://ereserve.library.usyd.edu.au.ezproxy2.library.usyd.edu.au/fisher/McTigheUnderstanding1999.pdf

 

 

Visible Thinking. (2015). Visible thinking pictures of practice [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.visiblethinkingpz.org/VisibleThinking_html_files/01_VisibleThinkingInAction/01c_VTPoP.html

Rescooped by Alexis King from Geography Early Stage One: Caring for special places
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Source 1: My Hiding Place

An interactive literary text that narrates a young girl's adventure in her special place. 

Via Kenix Pang
Alexis King's insight:
ES1 Geography
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Kenix Pang's curator insight, April 7, 7:52 AM
Links to curriculum: Early stage 1 People live in Places
- GEe-1: Identifies places and develops an understanding of the importance of places to people.

Content Descriptors:
- discussion of why places are special and how people care for them (linking to Inquiry Question - What makes a place special?)

Resource Description:
This interactive text is a fantastic resource for not only teachers, but also students. Its colourful images make it engaging for students in addition to the ability to click on certain animated objects. The text assists students in developing an understanding of the importance of place to people, and that a special place can be found at home. According to Winch & Holiday (2010), this multimodal text encompasses the linguistic, visual, audio and special semiotic systems, which when used simultaneously increase the nature of learning. 

 Teaching ideas: 
Prior to reading the text, the teacher would brainstorm students' knowledge about special places, encouraging them to justify why that place is considered special to them. The teacher has the option of reading the text or allowing the speaker to read. After reading the text, refer back to the brainstorm poster and discuss the similarities and differences between the special place mentioned in the book and the special places mentioned in the brainstorm poster. Focus on the last page of the text: "Do you have a special hiding place?" and allow students to draw their special place. Students are encouraged to write a sentence about their special place or may be assisted by the teacher. 

References:
 Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.
Rescooped by Alexis King from EDUP3002 - S1: 'Features of Places: Weather & Seasons'
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Comparing Seasonal cycles

Comparing Seasonal cycles | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it

Via Jessica German
Alexis King's insight:
Stage 1 Geography Seasons and Weather
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Jessica German's curator insight, April 7, 10:54 PM
This resource created by Stephanie Alexander (2014) covers a unit of work based on investigating different points of view, past and present, about seasons in Australia. As the content slightly differs from the content focus in the stage 1 weather and seasons strand, ideas from the document can be manipulated and altered to do so. 
Although the document states the suitability for years 3-7, elements of the unit can be adapted for a stage 1 class. 

Key concepts: 
• How seasons relate to climate but also culture 
• Exploring Australian Indigenous seasons and food cycles (incorporating Indigenous perspective)
• Comparing the Indigenous season structure to the compare them to the European calendar-based system in which each season is a tidy three months long (the seasonal structure which students follow are familiar with) 
• Comparison of the daily and seasonal weather patterns of places - can lead to discussion about how weather can affect places and activities e.g. provide scenarios; "if my birthday is in December, considering the time of year and season, how might I choose to celebrate? What might I do?"
• European calendar divides into 4 seasons (Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter) – those experienced by students

Teaching ideas:    
• Students can create their own circular seasonal calendar (must be scaffolded/modelled)
• Calendars can be used for inspiration for artworks (visual arts KLA) 

Teaching notes:
• the resource is an adaptable, resourceful document that covers a range of concepts and KLAs
• addresses numerous, specific KLAs - science, geography, design and technologies, visual arts, mathematics, cross-curriculum priorities 
• step-by-step lesson/task ideas
• provides interactive ICT links - can be explored as a class on IWB
• provides resources for students to use - teachers can photocopy blank seasonal calendar for students     
• demonstration of an integrated curriculum (Reynolds, 2012)

NOTE: it is more appropriate to explore the seasonal cycle of Europe, visually, as the main focus is to be drawn to major features of each season, not to the technical features of each, such as astronomical seasons, often referred to in written documents (see other resources).
As the document focuses greatly on Indigenous seasons, the focus is on students exploring the seasonal calendar they follow (to create their own circular calendar)     

References: 
Alexander, S. (2014). Seasonal Cycles in Australia. Teacher Resource: Kitchen Garden Foundation. 

Reynolds, R. (Ed.). (2012). Teaching, History, Geography & SOSE In The Primary School. Sydney: Oxford University Press.  

Other useful resources: 


IF LINK IS UNAVAILABLE ABOVE:
Rescooped by Alexis King from Stage 1 Geography: People and Places
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15 Picture Books That Support Children’s Spatial Skills Development

15 Picture Books That Support Children’s Spatial Skills Development | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it
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Via Catherine Smyth, Jasmine Chan
Alexis King's insight:
Stage 1 Geography- spatial skills
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Jasmine Chan's curator insight, April 9, 9:28 AM
Outcome: 
Inquiry question: Where are places located in Australia? 

This resource provides teachers with an insightful reflection on the importance of developing spatial skills through appropriate picture books. Especially for young students in Early Stage 1 and Stage 1, ‘spatially challenging picture books’ can develop spatial thinking and provide exposure to spatial language in an engaging way (Dillemuth In Kris, 2015). For young students, teaching mapping explicitly often proved to be problematic rather than beneficial (Liben & Downs, 1994, p. 557). As such, teachers can use the picture book to ignite interest and curiousity about geographical concepts. 

Teaching ideas: Some examples of appropriate picture books for Stage 1 are: 
- Lucy in the City: A story about developing spatial thinking skills by Julie Dillemuth 
- Henry’s map by David Elliot 
- Katy and the Big snow by Virignia Lee Burton 
- Piggies in the Pumpkin Patch by Mary Peterson and Jennifer Rofe 

Katy and the Big Snow portrays an amazing map of ‘Geoppolis’, which is revisited when the town is snowed in and Katy, the tractor must plow out sections of the town. Katy needs to figure out where she needs to go next and this book incorporates directions and spatial relationships between the city and its surroundings. After reading this book as a class, students will explore the city closely and draw their own maps of their ideal city using symbols and labels. Students will be able to use their creativity, as they think about ways in which places and spaces can be better designed (ACARA, 2011, p. 8). Teachers need to also ensure students draw to scale, being aware of the distance between the city services and shops and the size of buildings and smaller objects. This also addresses and links to Stage 1 Mathematics Outcome, ‘MA1-9MG measures, records, compares and estimates lengths and distances using uniform informal units, metres and centimetres’ (Board of Studies NSW, 2012, p. 22). 

References: 
Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2011). The shape of the Australian curriculum: geography. Sydney, NSW. Retrieved 8th April, 2016 from http://www.acara.edu.au/verve/_resources/shape_of_the_australian_curriculum_geography.pdf ;

Board of Studies NSW. (2012). NSW Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum: Mathematics K-10 Syllabus. Sydney, NSW. Retrieved 8th April, 2016 from http://syllabus.bostes.nsw.edu.au/mathematics/mathematics-k10/ ;

Kris. F.D. (2015). KQED News: 15 Picture books that support children’s spatial skills development. Retrieved 8th April, 2016 from http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2015/12/18/15-picture-books-that-support-childrens-spatial-skills-development/ ;

Liben, L., & Downs, R. (1994). Fostering Geographic Literacy from Early Childhood: The contributions of interdisciplinary research. Journal Of Applied Developmental Psychology, 15(4), 549-567. Retrieved 8thApril, 2016 from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/222739971_Fostering_geographic_literacy_from_early_childhood_The_contributions_of_interdisciplinary_research
Rescooped by Alexis King from What Makes a Place Special?
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My Place in the World (Craft Project)

My Place in the World (Craft Project) | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it
This simple project with help teach kids geography and increase their global awareness as they begin to grasp their city, state, country, and continent.

Via Claire Kenway
Alexis King's insight:
ES1 Geography
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Claire Kenway's curator insight, April 10, 6:03 AM
This simple, yet fun and eye catching craft idea helps students to understand their place in the world, through multiple layers (my home, my city, my state, my country, my planet). The craft is compiled of 5-6 cardboard plates that each have their own colour and label corresponding to each of the previously mentioned layers of a student’s place in the world. Starting from “my home”, each paper plate gets larger and larger to create a target-like arrangement, joined by a ring at the top. Students can draw or colour in a picture of the place that corresponds to each layer of the craft project. 

This craft activity broadens student’s understanding of geography as it visually conveys the notion of local places belonging within places on a global scale. This craft could be used to further extend students ideas of what makes a place special to them, after previous exploration of this geographical concept. An example of differentiation for this task would be allowing advanced students to draw their own pictures of their home, city, state, and so on, or providing pre stencilled pictures for students who need more scaffolding. This craft also bares a clear link to the creative arts syllabus, as students “make simple pictures and other kinds of artworks about things and experiences.” (BOSTES NSW, 2016) 

This resource is extremely learner focused as each student uses their own life, experience, knowledge and interests to customise their craft to accurately represent their place in the world. Fahey emphasises the importance of learner focused teaching, stating that “instruction must begin with what learners already know and can do” (2012, p.4), in other words, using their own experiences to shape their learning. Brophy & Alleman have asserted the idea that “young students almost always have at least some experiential base to bring to bear, but their prior knowledge about topics addressed in these subjects is usually very limited” (2009, p. 370), which implies the need to extend students prior knowledge and experiences when planning effective learning. Not only is this craft project centred around student’s own experiences, it extends their knowledge of place from local to global. 

References: 

BOSTES NSW. (2016). New NSW Syllabuses. Retrieved from http://syllabus.bostes.nsw.edu.au 

Brophy, J. & Alleman, J. (2009) Meaningful social studies for elementary students, Teachers and Teaching, 15:3, 357-376
Rescooped by Alexis King from Geography Stage 1: Where are places located in Australia?
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Source 1: Learn about where certain Australian landmarks located

Source 1: Learn about where certain Australian landmarks located | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it

**You need to have a TES account to access this resource. it is free to sign up.**

Children asked to find information on Australia's popular landmarks . Pictures and titles to be matched using the internet and then an opinion asked for in summary.


Via Amelia Laumberg
Alexis King's insight:
Stage 1 Geography.
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Amelia Laumberg's curator insight, April 8, 10:28 PM
This resource is perfect for Year 2 students who want to discover more about Australian Landmarks. It can be used to develop their knowledge about where these landmarks are and to learn an interesting fact about each one. According to the Syllabus, students need to be able to identity places with in Australia on a personal, local and national level (BOSTES, 2012). This activity would achieve that goal as well as improving students ICT skills. This task requires students to effectively use the Internet to locate each landmark and find an interesting fact about it. 

 This activity also ties in with literacy as students are asked to write a sentence about each landmark and then choose their favourite. This resource is suited for Stage 1, Year 2 students and should be used to expand students’ knowledge about Australian landmarks. It would ideally be taught in conjunction with History as it would help the student’s remember the landmarks if they understand the reason behind them being built.

Reference:
Board of Studies NSW. (2012). Geography K-10 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.
Rescooped by Alexis King from Primary Resources for K-6
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Studyladder- How Weather Affects Our Daily Lives


Via Shirley Chen
Alexis King's insight:
Stage 1 Geography. Weather
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Shirley Chen's curator insight, April 9, 11:27 PM
Student resource!

This resource focuses on the use of photographs which is important in stimulating geographical inquiry among students. Photographs help bring geography to life and allows children to identify, interpret, and discuss; as well as making distant places become accessible through recognition of features and links to their own locality (Geographical Association, 2009). 

When studying photographs, it is usually better to focus on specific things in the picture rather than ask general questions (Geography Association, 2009). Examples of more focussed questions may include: 
• What could happen if planes travelled in extreme fog? 
• How might a bushfire affect people’s lives? 

Teaching ideas: 
• See Think Wonder encourages students to collect all evidence prior to making an interpretation (Boon, 2012, p. 83). It involves students recording what they actually observe without interpretation; then what they think those observations mean; and finally ask questions about information not immediately available to them (Boon, 2012, p. 83). For example, for the photograph of the tree fallen over on a car, questions students would wonder about include what caused the tree to fall over and how do we ensure people do not get hurt from these incidents. After considerable time studying the photographs, students can discuss as a whole class or in small groups the two discussion questions on the first slide. 
• Students investigate their local area and take digital photographs of different places experiencing particular weather conditions. They must provide a brief caption the photo, using the presentation slides as a model. Taking to sourcing and interpreting photographs is a main geographical fieldwork skill that students are expected to develop during their schooling (Taylor, Boon & Kriewaldt, 2012, p. 263). 

References: 
Boon, D. (2012). Developing thinking and understanding in primary geography and history (Chapter 5). In Taylor, Fahey, Kriewaldt & Boon. Place and Time, Explorations in Teaching Geography and History. Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia.

Geographical Association (2009). Using images with children. Retrieved April 6, 2016 from www.geography.org.uk/download/GA_ADVUsingImages.pdf

Taylor, T., Boon, D. & Kriewaldt, J. (2012). The permeable classroom (Chapter 15). In Taylor, Fahey, Kriewaldt & Boon. Place and Time, Explorations in Teaching Geography and History. Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia.
Rescooped by Alexis King from Geoworld - Inspiring Geography Stage 1 Content for Teachers (GE1-2) people interacting with and caring for places
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Coral Bleaching

Coral Bleaching | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it
BTN Video

Via Michael Winkler
Alexis King's insight:
Stage 1 Geography. Caring for Places
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Michael Winkler's curator insight, April 9, 8:38 AM
Students can use this Behind the News video to investigate the inquiry question of “How can we care for places?” located in the NSW geography syllabus. Students can investigate the question of why coral is loosing its colours and consider how humans can care for this place. The idea of coral bleaching may perhaps be quite complex for some stage 1 students but a general conversation and inquiry of coral loosing its colour and how to care for the environmental can take place. 

 Gilbert (2014) describes inquiry learning in three steps, posing questions and planning the inquiry; collecting and analyzing evidence; and concluding and responding to the inquiry. Students can follow through these steps to interact with a real life issue surrounding the care for places in our world. Students may pose questions such as who is responsible for taking care of these places and is enough being done to care for this place for future generations. They are also able to think of ways they might be able to create actions to respond to this environmental issue. Gilbert, R. (2014). Planning for Student Learning. 

In Gilbert, R. and Hoepper, B (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences. 5th Edition. Victoria. Cengage
Rescooped by Alexis King from Digital Resources for Stage 1 Geography
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RESOURCE 2: Voices in the Park


Via Yeonji Lee
Alexis King's insight:
Stage 1 Geography- mapping. Links to Literacy and Numeracy.
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Yeonji Lee's curator insight, April 5, 8:34 PM
What this resource offers:
According to Clarke & Pittaway (2014), teachers today can create more effective yet engaging lessons as there are more learning platforms available, such as online programs and games. This engaging read aloud, interactive picture book, Voices in the Park by Anthony Browne is no exception as it engulfs student attention through interesting plot whilst introducing multiple contents of geography such as:
- discussing the idea of how people use a place for different purposes and thus, how that affects the connection people have with places (BOSTES, 2015). 
- communicates geographical information and uses geographical tools for inquiry (BOSTES, 2015).

Teaching Idea 1:
Explore different attitudes characters have towards going to the park and how that attitude affects how spaces within places can be used for different purposes through cooperative learning strategy called 'Think-Pair-Share' (Kagan, 1989) and report back to the whole class.

1) Each pair will be assigned a pair of characters which they need to compare.
- Smudge's father vs. Charles' mother i.e Does Smudge's father and Charles' mother have the same intention when going to the park? How does Charles' mother react when Charles' is out of her sight? How does Smudge's father react when Smudge is out of his sight? It's the same park and they are both adults, why do you think they connect differently to the same park?
- Smudge vs. Charles
- Victoria vs. Albert

2) Can people have different connections with one place or are they all identical? Why? Can the same space be used for different purposes? Why?    

Teaching Idea 2:
Requires extensive scaffolding by the teacher as it requires high order thinking. Students will need to trace the characters' footsteps at the park and map out the park portrayed in the picture book. During the process, students will use key words such as 'left, right, up and down' which will allow children to communicate geographical information. Furthermore, this provides 'students with the opportunity to hear and use [appropriate] language' (Kruse, 1979), which develops the ability to communicate geographical information and further enhances communication skills. Thus, emphasising Winch, Johnston, March, Ljungdahl & Holliday's (2010) statement that critical literacy is not just for text analysis but for life skills. 

Additional resource for teachers to teach about Mapping: http://education.nationalgeographic.org/activity/mapping-classroom/


Reference:
BOSTES (2015). Geography K-10 Syllabus. Retrieved 5th April, 2016 from http://syllabus.bostes.nsw.edu.au/assets/geographyk10/downloads/geographyk10_full.pdf

Clarke, M. & Pittaway, S. (2014). Marsh's Becoming a Teacher. Frenchs Forest: Pearson.

Kagan, S. (1989). Cooperative Learning: Resources for Teachers. San Juan Capistrano, CA.

Kruse, A.F (1979). Vocabulary in Context. English Language Teaching Journal, 33(3), 207-13. 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing & children’s literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.
Rescooped by Alexis King from Stage 1 Weather and Seasons (Features of Places)
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Video: Effects of Dry Weather 

Video: Effects of Dry Weather  | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it

"What do you feel like when the weather is hot and dry? Discover what happens to the land during dry weather. Look at how the landscape changes at different times of the year."


Via Julia H
Alexis King's insight:
Stage 1 Geography
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Julia H's curator insight, April 5, 8:18 AM
This informative Splash ABC video depicts important ideas behind the effects of dry weather including the natural and human features of places, changes in the landscape at different times of the year, plant and animal adaptations to drought and human responses to ensure the sustainability of water resources. This is a great resource for teachers to use in a stage one classroom as a stimulus for whole class discussion. According to the NSW Geography syllabus, it is crucial that students engage in “discussion of how weather can affect places and activities” (BOSTES, 2015, p.41). The visual and auditory representations, use of simple language and the style of reporting from a young girl’s perspective illustrates the topic in a way that is stimulating and easy for students to understand. 

Teaching ideas: 
 Working in groups or as a class, use a KWL chart to write down what students know (K), want to know (W), and has learned about the effects of dry weather on the environment and people. This should be used throughout the learning process: before, during and after. 


 Activate and draw on students’ prior knowledge, and encourage discussion by asking comprehension questions based on information from the video: 
• Can you remember what if feels like in really dry weather? 
       o A) hot, sweaty, avoiding the sun and seeking shade. 
• Predict what would happen to the land around you if it doesn’t get much rain. 
• What can happen if we don’t get much rain for a long time? 
• What happens to the landscape (the water, soil, trees and land)
• Why do some parts of the landscape stay green in dry weather?    

Recent studies have shown the many benefits of using digital learning resources. This includes that such resources support information processing by helping students to develop mental representations through the combination of media elements (Eady & Lockyer, 2013, p.78). Moreover, student attention and engagement with this resource helps them to process information into working memory. This resource should be shown at the beginning of the unit to activate students’ prior knowledge and to start a discussion about this topic. 

References: 
Board of Studies, Teaching & Educational Standards NSW. (2015). Geography k-10 syllabus. NSW, Australia: Author. 

Eady, M.J., & Lockyer, L. (2013). Tools for learning: technology and teaching strategies. In P. Hudson (Ed.), Learning to teach in the primary school (pp. 71-88). New York: Cambridge University Press 

Splash ABC. (1995, June 22). Effects of dry weather [Video file]. Retrieved from http://splash.abc.net.au/home#!/media/30222/effects-of-dry-weather
Rescooped by Alexis King from Stage 1 Geography: Weather and Seasons
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Resource 5: Miriwoong Seasonal Calendar (Student Resource)

Resource 5: Miriwoong Seasonal Calendar (Student Resource) | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it
The Bureau of Meteorology's blog features articles, information and multimedia - sharing our work with you.

Via Tess Taylor
Alexis King's insight:
Year 1 Geography Weather and Seasons
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Tess Taylor's curator insight, April 9, 12:27 AM
Outcomes: 
 describes features of places and the connections people have with places GE1-1 

 Content: 
investigate the weather and seasons of places, for example: (ACHGK006) 
 - Examination of how different cultural groups, including Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Peoples, describe weather, seasons or seasonal calendars 


 “As a multicultural nation we must rightfully understand the position of the original inhabitants” (Van Issum 2010, p. 59) .It is therefore essential that teachers include a study of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people when exploring weather and seasons as they developed an intricate understanding of the environment over many thousands of years. The meteorological view of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is very diverse, thus all around Australia exists different seasonal calendars. This interactive resource represents the Mirrawong Calendar, (approximately 50km east of Kununurra inside Northern Territory) and shows three major seasons. 

 This calendar is interactive, visually appealing and easy to navigate, therefore ideal for Stage 1. The calendar can be explored as a whole class on an Interactive Whiteboard or individually, where the teacher creates a worksheet with certain comprehension questions regarding the seasons. Attached to the calendar is a movie titled “Miriwoong Traditional Weather Knowledge: Helping to understand indicators of seasonal change”. This movie is subtitled, therefore could be difficult for some Stage 1 learners, but can be watched as a useful resource for the teacher, to learn more about the topic at hand. 

Reference: 

Board of Studies, Teaching & Educational Standards NSW. (2015). Syllabus: Geography K-10. NSW, Australia. 

 Van Issum, H. (2012). Why we need Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Perspectives. In T, Taylor., C, Fahey., J, Kriewaldt. & D, Boon, Place and Time (pp. 1-6), Frenchs Forrest: Pearson Australia.
Rescooped by Alexis King from Stage 1 Geography - Aboriginal Australian connections between people and places
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Meet Uluru's Traditional Owners - ABC Splash

Meet Uluru's Traditional Owners - ABC Splash | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it
3000+ educational games, videos and teaching resources for schools and students. Free Primary and Secondary resources covering history, science, English, maths and more

Via Lizzie James
Alexis King's insight:
Stage 1 Geography Aboriginal Care or Places
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Lizzie James's curator insight, April 10, 2:28 PM
This resource is a video that can be streamed in a Year 2 classroom to show students the cultural value of place to Aboriginal people. This can be an introductory video to build students’ field of understanding of Aboriginal Australian connections to country, with specific focus on the Anangu people. 
This resource connects to BOSTES Stage 1 Geography outcome GE1-1 and descriptors 'investigate people’s connections and access to places' and 'investigate connections that people, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, have to local and global place'.
The video is an informative segment how different cultures view the same site and in particular how Non-Indigenous tourists walking Ularu is disrespectful towards the Anangu people. Students will be shown that this tension is because the Anangu and all Aboriginal Australians have a much deeper relationship to their home and land. 
In the classroom this resource should be watched all the way through and during the second viewing, the teacher can pause or re-watch sections the video to allow for further explanation or student comments. 
Rescooped by Alexis King from Weather and Seasons- Year 1 Geography
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Scoop 4- Explore the Weather Game

Scoop 4- Explore the Weather Game | History and Geography Sites for ES1 & S1 teachers - NSW Curriculum | Scoop.it
Objectives: • develop knowledge and understanding of interactions between people, places and environments 
 Content: • discussion of how weather can affect places and activities eg leisure, farming • description of the daily and seasonal weather patterns of a familiar place

Via Lydia Feeney
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Lydia Feeney's curator insight, April 9, 10:31 PM
This resource is appropriate for the very beginning of a unit of study on weather and seasons. Students are presented with a certain kind of weather e.g. sunny, rainy, windy and are given four options for potential appropriate clothes for the weather. This begins to instill the correlation what the weather is like outdoors in relation to what people wear to feel comfortable in different situations. The game allows focus "on the formal education area in an informal and enjoyable way" leading to better student engagement throughout the unit of study (Lopez & Caceres, 2010).This activity is relatively basic but it will give the teacher a rough idea of whether the students have any concept about how the weather affects people. 

As an extension to this activity, students could create sentences describing a certain weather situation and how they would feel in that situation e.g. "I feel wet and cold in the rain, unless I wear my raincoat and hat". A sentence like this reflects on the direct consequences of dressing to suit the weather. 
 
Objectives: 
• develop knowledge and understanding of interactions between people, places and environments 
Content: 
• discussion of how weather can affect places and activities eg leisure, farming 
• description of the daily and seasonal weather patterns of a familiar place

References
Lopez, J. and Caceres, M (2010). Virtual Games in Social Science Education. Huelva University