USB Drive Innovations
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Kickstarter 'Plug' transforms USB drives into personal Dropbox - Storage - News - HEXUS.net

Kickstarter 'Plug' transforms USB drives into personal Dropbox - Storage - News - HEXUS.net | USB Drive Innovations | Scoop.it
Combined software and hardware solution improves on "expensive and slow" cloud.
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The Practical Meter: Know your power!

The Practical Meter helps you charge your phone faster by solving a problem millions of people experience.
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Aeflex Technologies -Protect Data In USB Flash Drive With flex-it

Aeflex Technologies -Protect Data In USB Flash Drive With flex-it | USB Drive Innovations | Scoop.it
Our product password protects your data within USB flash drives. Also prevents people from copying or sharing your ebooks, training or software. Learn more!
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Pioneering Personal Storage as a Platform

Aeflex specialized in USB Flash Drive Development Platform for Solution Providers, USB Drive Distributors, Ads Agency
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$79 Plug Makes Creating Your Own Cloud Easy

$79 Plug Makes Creating Your Own Cloud Easy | USB Drive Innovations | Scoop.it
The “Plug” is a device with an Ethernet connection, and a USB port that allows you to connect up to 8 USB drives, and access those in a unified fashion from all your devices. It’s a...

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Top 8 Best & Must Have Portable Geeky Apps | Tech Web Stuff

Top 8 Best & Must Have Portable Geeky Apps | Tech Web Stuff | USB Drive Innovations | Scoop.it
Best Portable Geeky Apps to download with Google Chrome, Firefox, FeedReader, Notepad++, Evernote, Keepass, 7zip, TrueCrypt saving valuable time & money

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SanDisk Connect Wireless Flash Drive - CNET

SanDisk Connect Wireless Flash Drive - CNET | USB Drive Innovations | Scoop.it
AndroidPIT.com SanDisk Connect Wireless Flash Drive CNET If you can't find what you want on this relatively long list of battery-operated Wi-Fi storage devices, SanDisk today unveiled two more choices of its own, the Connect Wireless Flash Drive...
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Boot Your Mac Into Mavericks Beta From A USB Drive [OS X Tips ...

Boot Your Mac Into Mavericks Beta From A USB Drive [OS X Tips ... | USB Drive Innovations | Scoop.it
Are you a registered developer with Apple? Do you want to try out Mavericks without risking your entire Mac to a potentially wonky version of OS X? I haven.
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Crypteks USB™ - Inspired Design meets Ultra-Security

Super-secure your digital stash with the Crypteks USB™ featuring a customizable lock and world-class data encryption
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Computer memory can be read with a flash of light 10,000 times faster at about a fifth of energy consumption

Computer memory can be read with a flash of light 10,000 times faster at about a fifth of energy consumption | USB Drive Innovations | Scoop.it

Modern computer-memory technologies come with a trade-off. There is speedy but short-term storage for on-the-fly processing — random-access memory, or RAM — and slow but enduring memory for data and programs that need to be stored long term, typically on a hard disk or flash drive.

 

In conventional computer memory, information is stored in cells that hold different amounts of electric charge, each representing a binary '1' or '0'. Bismuth ferrite, by contrast, can represent those binary digits, or bits, as one of two polarization states, and can switch between these states when a voltage is applied — a property called ferroelectricity. Ferroelectric RAM based on other materials is already on the market. It is speedy, but the technology has not found widespread use. One problem is that the electrical signal used to read out a bit erases it, so the data must be rewritten every time. This leads to reliability problems over time.

 

Ramamoorthy Ramesh, a materials scientist at the University of California, Berkeley, and Junling Wang, a specialist in oxide materials at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, realized that they could take advantage of another property of bismuth ferrite to read these memory arrays in a nondestructive way. In 2009, researchers at Rutgers University in Piscataway, New Jersey, demonstrated that the material has a photovoltaic response to visible light — meaning that when it is hit by light, a voltage is created. The size of the voltage depends on which polarization state the material is in, and can be read out using electrodes or transistors. Crucially, shining light on the material doesn’t change its polarization, and so does not erase the data stored in it.

 

To test whether photovoltaic ferroelectric memory really worked, Ramesh and Wang grew films of bismuth ferrite on top of a metal oxide, then etched it into four strips. On top of that they laid four metal strips at right angles to the first set. The 16 squares where the crossbars met each acted as memory cells, and the metal and metal oxide acted as electrodes. The team used the electrodes to polarize the cells, then shone light onto the whole array and found that it produced two types of voltage readings — one negative (0) and one positive (1).

 

It takes less than 10 nanoseconds to write to and read the cells, and recording the data requires about 3 volts. The leading nonvolatile RAM technology, flash, takes about 10,000 times longer to read and write, and needs 15 volts to record.

 

Victor Zhirnov, a materials specialist at the Semiconductor Research Corporation in Durham, North Carolina, says that the technology will need to be made much smaller before it is competitive. Commercial flash memory is built using equipment that can pattern features as small as 22 nanometres, whereas the strips in the photovoltaic ferroelectric memory device are a hefty 10 micrometres wide. “Smaller size results in more memory per cubic centimetre, and thus lower cost per bit,” says Zhirnov.

 

Ramesh says that there is no fundamental reason that the memory cells in his device could not be made as small as those in other memory arrays, although it will pose some practical challenges.

 

There is also the matter of designing a system to light up the cells one at a time. Illuminating the whole array all the time, as in these first experiments, is probably not practical, says Ramesh. So engineers may have to design optical parts to funnel light to each cell individually when it needs to be read.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Dean Jones's curator insight, September 9, 2013 9:19 AM

This both benifits the enviroment as well as speed in your computer. With the use of the elctric charges to transfer data at a insanse speed.

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uDock

uDock is the best Windows Portable Software Launcher.
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SanDisk Connect Flash Drive Wirelessly Sends Files to Your Phone

SanDisk Connect Flash Drive Wirelessly Sends Files to Your Phone | USB Drive Innovations | Scoop.it

SanDisk released a flash storage device Monday that can actually beam files to and from your devices — without an Internet connection.


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The Best USB 3.0 Thumb Drive

The Best USB 3.0 Thumb Drive | USB Drive Innovations | Scoop.it
The 32 GB SanDisk Extreme USB 3.0 Flash Drive is the best flash drive and the one to buy. Not only is it the fastest flash drive we tested after scouring the fi

 

There are too many drives out and old stuff is generally not worth getting. This passage from Brian’s 2012 guide still holds true today:

“Remember that the best drives from only a few years ago are neither fast nor a deal compared to the newer ones. For example, the Patriot XT USB 2.0 drive won a roundup held by Ars Technica in 2009 and it is the most highly rated drive on Amazon with nearly 400 reviews and an average four and a half star rating. It sounds like a winner. But this drive, now only 3 years old, maxes out at 25 MB per second for reads and 15 MB per seconds for writes…It is a drive that you should completely avoid, and the world is filled with drives like this.”


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Turn an Android Stick into a Streaming Media and Google Voice ...

Turn an Android Stick into a Streaming Media and Google Voice ... | USB Drive Innovations | Scoop.it
You've probably seen those multi-function, Android-powered USB sticks that can become a tiny server, a console emulator, and more. Well, Vince at Network Hax took one, traded Android for Linux, and used his not just as a ...
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Use a Flexible USB Adapter to Avoid Breaking Flash Drives - Lifehacker

Use a Flexible USB Adapter to Avoid Breaking Flash Drives - Lifehacker | USB Drive Innovations | Scoop.it
Use a Flexible USB Adapter to Avoid Breaking Flash Drives
Lifehacker
Plugging a USB drive into a port on the front of a desktop is convenient, but you're also one knee-bump away from breaking the thing.
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