US natural disasters
14 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jordan Meyer from News in english
Scoop.it!

Yet Another Study Confirms #Fracking Wastewater Wells Cause Earthquakes

Yet Another Study Confirms #Fracking Wastewater Wells Cause Earthquakes | US natural disasters | Scoop.it
Residents of Youngstown, Ohio didn’t even know what an earthquake felt like before the fracking industry came to town., earthquakes, Fracking, fracking wastewater, Marcellus Shale, Ohio,

Via Juan Carlos Hernandez
Jordan Meyer's insight:

Scientist believe that Fracking Wasetwater wells are causing earthquakes because of the "fluid injection" or pretty much the wasterwater getting shot into the ground because this is something they can't store above ground. It has caused over 100 earthquakes sense they have started using Fracking Wastewater Wells. They really don't even need these wells, they can find some other way to dispose of it by doing chemical research or something. So really it's their own fault and they know it's going to keep happening if they don't stop using them. 

more...
Juan Carlos Hernandez's curator insight, September 6, 2013 1:51 PM

Yet Another Study Confirms #Fracking Wastewater Wells Cause Earthquakes

Residents of Youngstown, Ohio didn’t even know what an earthquake felt like before the fracking industry came to town.

Scooped by Jordan Meyer
Scoop.it!

Are terrorists setting US wildfires? - WND.com

Are terrorists setting US wildfires? - WND.com | US natural disasters | Scoop.it
WND.com
Are terrorists setting US wildfires?
WND.com
This year's wildfire in Yosemite started Aug. 17 in the Stanislaus National Forest, but authorities believe it was not an act off terror.
Jordan Meyer's insight:

In 2013 the US has experienced many devastating wildfires. It is reported that the government believes that terrorists are lighting these fires and using them as a tactical weapon of war. I think the US should take action over this because it could be someone like Syria taking our focus of the chemical weapons and things they are hiding to try and get us to focus on our own problems here in the US.  

more...
Molly Kellar's comment, October 4, 2013 12:38 AM
It could be a possibility that some of these wildfires were started by terrorists. It's a way that they could try to cover up what they were trying to do without getting caught.
kenny kersbergen's comment, October 8, 2013 2:58 PM
it could be possible that terrorists are starting fires but it has also been really dry and humid this year and the could have been what started the forest fires.
Jerod Garland's comment, October 15, 2013 8:39 PM
Interesting article and scary to think about. Nice job, Jordan.
Rescooped by Jordan Meyer from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

What direction does Earth's center spin? New insights solve 300-year-old problem

What direction does Earth's center spin? New insights solve 300-year-old problem | US natural disasters | Scoop.it

Earth's inner core, made up of solid iron, 'superrotates' in an eastward direction -- meaning it spins faster than the rest of the planet -- while the outer core, comprising mainly molten iron, spins westwards at a slower pace.

 

Although Edmund Halley -- who also discovered the famous comet -- showed the westward-drifting motion of Earth's geomagnetic field in 1692, it is the first time that scientists have been able to link the way the inner core spins to the behavior of the outer core. The planet behaves in this way because it is responding to Earth's geomagnetic field.

 

The findings, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, help scientists to interpret the dynamics of the core of Earth, the source of our planet's magnetic field.

 

In the last few decades, seismometers measuring earthquakes travelling through Earth's core have identified an eastwards, or superrotation of the solid inner core, relative to Earth's surface.

 

"The link is simply explained in terms of equal and opposite action," explains Dr Philip Livermore, of the School of Earth and Environment at the University of Leeds. "The magnetic field pushes eastwards on the inner core, causing it to spin faster than Earth, but it also pushes in the opposite direction in the liquid outer core, which creates a westward motion."

 

The solid iron inner core is about the size of the Moon. It is surrounded by the liquid outer core, an iron alloy, whose convection-driven movement generates the geomagnetic field.

 

The fact that Earth's internal magnetic field changes slowly, over a timescale of decades, means that the electromagnetic force responsible for pushing the inner and outer cores will itself change over time. This may explain fluctuations in the predominantly eastwards rotation of the inner core, a phenomenon reported for the last 50 years by Tkalčić et al. in a recent study published in Nature Geoscience.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Jordan Meyer's insight:

We have found out that the inner core of earth roates eastwards. The magentic field pushes eastwards on the inner core, causing it to spin faster than Earth, but it also pushes in the opposite direction in the liquid outer core, which creates westward motion. This is the resoning for many earthquakes and if we can keep ahead in knowledge about how the earth is moving we will have a better idea of when these natural disasters will happen. Hopefully being able to prevent less loss of money for the country. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jordan Meyer
Scoop.it!

Controlled Tornadoes Create Renewable Energy - Discover Magazine

Controlled Tornadoes Create Renewable Energy - Discover Magazine | US natural disasters | Scoop.it
Waste heat from power plants could be twisted into a nonpolluting source of energy.
Jordan Meyer's insight:

A Canadian scientist has discovered that tornadoes could possibly be a good thing. Man made Atmospheric Vortex Engines are used by taking the waste heat from power plants and turning it into usable energy. This can be good in the future because it is reducing pollution with taking the waste from power plants. Also saving us a lot of money using natural resources for less costly energy. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jordan Meyer
Scoop.it!

NASA sends drones to track hurricanes' secrets - Science News

NASA sends drones to track hurricanes' secrets - Science News | US natural disasters | Scoop.it
A pair of converted military drones are the US space agency's newest tools for tracking hurricanes and tropical storms, with the aim of improving forecasters' ability to predict them.
Jordan Meyer's insight:

The US has new drones they are sending up into space to help track the weather so we are able to predict it better. These drones I believe will be a big help because they can fly 69.000 feet in altidude, reaching to places regurlar planes can't. This will help us predict weather and weather patters a lot sooner or a lot more accurate than we have in the past. It will noit only help track hurricanes but all different kinds of storms going on aroud the world. Overall it was a great move by NASA to help prevent much more damage from natural disasters.

more...
AJ Kingery's comment, October 1, 2013 10:28 AM
This is a great idea! We can predict the weather better now and also know when a terrible storm will hit or when it could happen. Then we can tell everybody to get out if its that bad of storm to save people's lives. Hopefully nothing goes wrong with this drone because it would be a huge advantage to predict the crazy weather.
Molly Kellar's comment, October 4, 2013 12:40 AM
I think drones are a reall y good idea. They could prevent so many natural disasters and make the earth so much safer. I hope these get put into action as soon as possible and see if they actually help.
Rescooped by Jordan Meyer from Sustain Our Earth
Scoop.it!

Intense Rains Cause Deadly Flash Floods in Northern Colorado | TIME.com

Intense Rains Cause Deadly Flash Floods in Northern Colorado | TIME.com | US natural disasters | Scoop.it
Torrential rains have caused at least 6 deaths near Boulder as floodwaters destroy roads and spark mudslides.

Via SustainOurEarth
Jordan Meyer's insight:

Towns north of Denver received a fair amount of flooding last week reaching up to 15 inches of rain. More than 17,000 homes have been damaged. Rapid waters have washed away roads, canceled schools, and closed buisnesses. There have been at least 6 deaths and they think the flooding was so bad because the city waterways are bad and are getting plugged up. I think they really need to do somethiing about it because the sate probably wasted a lot of money into something that could be prevented better.

more...
Delaney Poole's comment, October 2, 2013 6:30 PM
I agree I think that they need to figure out a way to make the town more safer. Plus I think that they need to leave the town until everything is better for them and the town.
Scooped by Jordan Meyer
Scoop.it!

No Major U.S. Hurricane Has Hit Since 2005. Why? - Huffington Post

No Major U.S. Hurricane Has Hit Since 2005. Why? - Huffington Post | US natural disasters | Scoop.it
By Douglas Main, LiveScience Staff Writer: The United States hasn't been any stranger to hurricanes in the last eight years.
Jordan Meyer's insight:

Is the reason we haven't had so many hurricanes really because of luck? Yes in fact it is mainly luck, along with how the atmospheric wind pressure and how close the hurricanes form to the coast. We are really lucky no major hurricane has hit us in 8 years saving the US probably millions if not billions of dollars on them. By preventing natural disasters by decreasing things like global warming we can save more money for our government to just throw away. 

more...
Delaney Poole's comment, October 2, 2013 6:33 PM
I agree with that, I truly think that we are lucky that we haven't have a bad, bad hurricane in a while. I also think that the government needs to do more and help out everyone else.