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How the states voted in every presidential election

The citizens of the United States have elected 44 presidents in 57 elections since the Constitution was adopted in 1789. Since the Civil War, presidential contests have been dominated by America's two major political parties – the Republicans and the Democrats. But over the last 150 years, state allegiance to these two parties has shifted greatly. Watch to see how the states voted in every presidential election since 1860.

 

Tags: electoral, mapping.


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A State-by-State Map of Where U.S. Immigrants Came From

A State-by-State Map of Where U.S. Immigrants Came From | US History | Scoop.it
The new Pew interactive covers 1850 to 2013.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, October 9, 2015 9:57 AM

Very interesting interactive map of where the majority of immigrants came from for each state, from 1850 to 2013.  

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5 Digital Mapping Projects That Visualize History

5 Digital Mapping Projects That Visualize History | US History | Scoop.it
Here are some of my favorite digital mapping projects for teaching and studying American history

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, September 1, 2015 12:11 PM

Links to a few great digital mapping project, such as the spread of slavery and emancipation.  

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Stories & Lesson Plans

Stories & Lesson Plans | US History | Scoop.it
Bring the world to your classroom with our stories and lesson plans. Our stories explore cultural, social and environmental issues with a humanistic lens. Aligned to National and Common Core standards, our lesson plans offer an interdisciplinary approach to learning and facilitates the development of active, critical thinking.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, September 8, 2015 5:00 PM

This site has a TON of resources on cultural, social & environmental issues.  Very interesting, thought provoking lessons.  

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Why do people believe myths about the Confederacy? Because our textbooks and monuments are wrong.

Why do people believe myths about the Confederacy? Because our textbooks and monuments are wrong. | US History | Scoop.it
False history marginalizes African Americans and makes us all dumber.

 

Tags: race, conflict, racism, historical, the South, landscape, monuments.


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Rebecca Cofield's insight:

Admittedly, I've got a thing for monuments in the cultural landscape.  This is a very nice article for a historical geographer on how memory and heritage are enshrined in the landscape; this process politicizes history in ways that shape the national narrative, and that shapes how we think in past.   Using historical geography to understand the debates in the news?  No way!!  Here James Loewen writes in the Washington Post on the topic for a general audience. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 1, 2015 10:33 PM

Admittedly, I've got a thing for monuments in the cultural landscape.  This is a very nice article for a historical geographer on how memory and heritage are enshrined in the landscape; this process politicizes history in ways that shape the national narrative, and that shapes how we think in past.   Using historical geography to understand the debates in the news?  No way!!  Here James Loewen writes in the Washington Post on the topic for a general audience. 

LoisCortez's curator insight, July 3, 2015 1:05 AM

well

ed alvarado's comment, July 4, 2015 12:31 AM
Thats amazing
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Annenberg Classroom

Annenberg Classroom | US History | Scoop.it

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, February 17, 2015 12:36 PM

Annenberg has a lot of quality resources on US History and civics education.  

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Mapped history of how Native American land was taken

Mapped history of how Native American land was taken | US History | Scoop.it
FlowingData

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Interactive WWI Timeline

Interactive WWI Timeline | US History | Scoop.it

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, February 4, 2014 3:06 PM

The National WWI Museum has a great interactive timeline with photographs and links to primary sources available free online.  

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JFK assassination: Many theories, but no 'real evidence' of a conspiracy

JFK assassination: Many theories, but no 'real evidence' of a conspiracy | US History | Scoop.it
The government’s most recent investigation into the assassination of John F. Kennedy began in 1994. The Oliver Stone movie “JFK” was still fresh in mind, and almost four in five Americans believed in a conspiracy to kill the 35th president.
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When Did Girls Start Wearing Pink?

When Did Girls Start Wearing Pink? | US History | Scoop.it

"Like other young boys of his era, Franklin Roosevelt wears a dress. This studio portrait was likely taken in New York in 1884."

 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 29, 2013 12:46 PM

I show this picture to my classes with the simple prompt: this was a major figure in U.S. history in the first half of the 20th century.  Most pick female historical figures and are startled to find out that it was a revered president.  This slideshow demonstrates the cultural shift over time that has led to gendered norms on dress in the United States.  This article is quite compelling.

Delicia Worrill's curator insight, July 30, 2013 9:20 AM

May work for a Psychology or Sociology class as well.

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20 Historic Black and White Photos Colorized

20 Historic Black and White Photos Colorized | US History | Scoop.it

"One of the greatest facets of reddit are the thriving subreddits, niche communities of people who share a passion for a specific topic. One of the Sifter’s personal favourites is r/ColorizedHistory. The major contributors are a mix of professional and amateur colorizers that bring historic photos to life through color."

 


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Tony Hall's curator insight, August 15, 2013 11:08 PM

This is cool! Really cool! I love monochrome photography but as the comment says "colorizers ... bring historic photos to life through color". Love it!

theo kuechel's comment, August 16, 2013 4:35 AM
This is fascinating for a number of reasons, firstly; in these days of digital photography where the default is 'colour' many photographers choose to convert their images to Black and White in order to create a mood or make visual statements. Although the images used in the piece will be Copyrighted - Flickr Commons http://www.flickr.com/commons offers a wealth of B&W images from museums around the world with 'no known copyright restrictions'. These could be used for all manner of educational and creative projects using colorising techniques.
Armando's curator insight, August 16, 2013 7:28 AM
20 Historic Black and White Photos Colorized
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The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere

Dramatic reading of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's classic poem, "The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere" by cdavid cottrill. History Website: https://sites.google.c...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 18, 2013 7:17 PM

As a friend of mine said, the ride of Paul Revere and Bunker Hill are great examples of geography shaping history.  To see this map of these events, see the Google Earth file.  

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, April 20, 2013 5:55 AM

Peu connu en France, un héros de la révolution américaine, et son épopée devenue mythique.

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Kent State: Past and Present

Kent State: Past and Present | US History | Scoop.it

On May 4, 1970, the Ohio National Guard gunned down Jeffrey Miller, Allison Krause, William Knox Schroeder, and Sandra Scheuer during an anti-war protest at Kent State University.


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Maegan Anderson's comment, May 7, 2013 12:37 AM
speechless...
Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, May 10, 2013 9:39 AM

Photos like this that juxtapose the original photograph to present day surroundings always grab me.  What an interesting discussion this could be in a history classroom!

Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:52 PM

Kent State: Past and Present | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

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How Texas Teaches History

How Texas Teaches History | US History | Scoop.it
Grammar matters, especially when textbooks tackle the subject of slavery.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, October 26, 2015 3:53 PM

I'm often guilty of using passive voice while writing - habits die hard.  This is a really powerful look not only at the fact that the content of the texts in question are downplaying history, but how the use of passive and active voice lends a completely different view of the text. 

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EarlyWarning

EarlyWarning | US History | Scoop.it

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, September 22, 2015 1:08 PM

Mass atrocities are rare yet devastating crimes. They are also preventable. Studies of past atrocities show that we can detect early warning signs of atrocities and that if policy makers act on those warnings and develop preventive strategies, we can save lives. Yet despite this awareness, all too often we see warning signs missed and action taken too late, if at all, in response to threats of mass atrocities.

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Just making sure you were paying attention...


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 2015 4:39 PM

Because it's funny; that's why. 

Scott Greer's curator insight, August 28, 2015 8:45 PM

All you need to know is that it is John Oliver....he's funny.

Gregory Stewart's curator insight, August 29, 2015 9:26 AM

This is a pretty funny clip.

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As South Carolina deals with its Confederate flag, one town in Brazil flies it with pride

As South Carolina deals with its Confederate flag, one town in Brazil flies it with pride | US History | Scoop.it
After the Civil War, members of the Confederacy fled to Brazil. Their ancestors still live in the region and continue to fly the Confederate flag.

Via Seth Dixon
Rebecca Cofield's insight:

While people debate why the southern states actually seceded, there are many who still honor what they see as the gallantry of genteel southern society in the Southern Hemisphere.  It is important to note that Brazil was chosen as the home of this 'Confederacy in Exile' because it was the last western country to abolish slavery (1888 it ended there too).  Here is another article discussing the the Brazilian enclaves of 'Confederados,' or children of the unreconstructed South.   

 

Tags: Brazil, historical, the South, landscape.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 2015 3:35 PM

While people debate why the southern states actually seceded, there are many who still honor what they see as the gallantry of genteel southern society in the Southern Hemisphere.  It is important to note that Brazil was chosen as the home of this 'Confederacy in Exile' because it was the last western country to abolish slavery (1888 it ended there too).  Here is another article discussing the the Brazilian enclaves of 'Confederados,' or children of the unreconstructed South.   


Tags: Brazil, historicalthe Southlandscape.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:56 PM

While people debate why the southern states actually seceded, there are many who still honor what they see as the gallantry of genteel southern society in the Southern Hemisphere.  It is important to note that Brazil was chosen as the home of this 'Confederacy in Exile' because it was the last western country to abolish slavery (1888 it ended there too).  Here is another article discussing the the Brazilian enclaves of 'Confederados,' or children of the unreconstructed South.   

 

Tags: Brazil, historical, the South, landscape.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 5:38 AM

The debate over the causes for the Civil War are always amusing. The main cause for the war was undoubtedly the issue of slavery. The souths  desperate attempts to hold on to the institution of slavery caused them to secede from the union. All of the major controversies between the north and the south  before the actual war involved slavery in one form or another. The Missouri Compromise or Bleeding Kansas would be just a few examples of that cause. I can understand the urge of southerners to want to celebrate their heritage. The problem is, they are celebrating a history that never existed. To describe the Civil War as an honorable gentile cause to beet back northern aggression is just not history, it is myth. I was to surprised to see Confederate celebrations in Brazil. Though, sense they were the last nation in this Hemisphere  to abolish slavery, it makes sense that some confederates would have fled there following the end of the war. Even more surprising was the fact that these heritage celebrations are biracial.  The power of myth can sway many people to a particular celebration or cause.

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History of Lynchings in the South Documents Nearly 4,000 Names

History of Lynchings in the South Documents Nearly 4,000 Names | US History | Scoop.it
After compiling an inventory of 3,959 lynching victims in 12 Southern states from 1877 to 1950, the Equal Justice Initiative wants to erect markers and memorials on certain sites.

 

Tags: race, conflict, racism, historical, the South, landscape.


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, February 16, 2015 12:00 PM

Fascinating, extremely sad map regarding almost 4000 lynching victims in the US South from 1877 to 1950.  

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Simulation of the Oso Landslide

Simulation of the Oso Landslide | US History | Scoop.it

"The large landslide that occurred in March near Oso, Washington was unusually mobile and destructive."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 2015 1:53 PM

There are several reasons for landslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  The landslide in Washington state last year was a combination of the two (see on map) and it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough).  Watch a simulation of the landslide here.  

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this landslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 2015 4:50 PM

This seems like a useful tool to a degree.  But if we could actually simulate every destructive event then we would be miracle workers.  This was a sad event.  We have left such an imprint on the earth that it's starting to fight back.  We need to be more aware and careful with the one planet we have.  Climate changes are in the news more and more.  We can't ignore climate changes anymore.  

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Globetrotting teacher visits more than 55 countries to inspire his students

Globetrotting teacher visits more than 55 countries to inspire his students | US History | Scoop.it
There’s no substitute for the sense of wonder on first seeing the Great Wall, says teacher Matthew Bell, plans to visit every country in the world to bring geography to life for his students (Globetrotting #geography teacher visits >55 countries...

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, September 12, 2014 11:34 AM

Does travel expand your teaching horizons?

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Tuskegee's Lynching Map of the United States

Tuskegee's Lynching Map of the United States | US History | Scoop.it
This map, compiled using data gathered by the Tuskegee Institute, represents the geographic distribution of lynchings during some of the years when the crime was most widespread in the United States. Tuskegee began keeping lynching records under the direction of Booker T. Washington, who was the institute's founding leader.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, February 17, 2014 2:06 PM

A disturbing map for students to look at for the 1900-1931 time period.  Some ideas for questioning - why were these happening?  did the Great Depression have any effect?  Who is the Tuskegee Institute and why would they make such a map?  Going deep into a primary source can always lead to great discussion and analysis!

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The Portraits of Thomas Jefferson

The Portraits of Thomas Jefferson | US History | Scoop.it
At the turn of the 18th century, Americans learned what their leaders looked like through paintings and drawings, explains a historian at the National Portrait Gallery

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Mohamed Cherif's comment, July 30, 2013 10:09 AM
I would to know more about this figure
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Inside WWII: Interactive Maps

Inside WWII: Interactive Maps | US History | Scoop.it
Go inside World War II and get new insight into the people, battles and events you thought you knew.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 23, 2013 1:25 PM

Nice quick way to get the user to see some of the key aspects of the War.  Showing the pan-germanism that Hitler esposed when taking the Sudetenland in the former Czechoslovakia to showing the suffering the civilian population of Leningrad.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2013 10:53 PM

World War II had a profound impact on so many places; the issues that contributed to these events and complex and inter-related.  This interactive with videos, pictures and commentary is a veritable treasure trove of resources for teachers and students alike.  

Greta Brewin's curator insight, October 31, 2013 2:20 AM

This is an interactive map of the world, which depicts the events and facts of the Second World War. Showing the impact felt all across the world and full of historical facts and information. It goes into detail about the motivations behind life changing decisions made and then the impact of them. Full of images, animations and videos, this website is sure to engage and entertain students. This map works geography into the history curriculum, and demonstrates the geographical impact on decision making in the war. It discusses the profound impact felt world wide from WWII and visually demonstrates it, which is great for visual learners. It is full of information for teachers and students. This interactive map is a wonderful resource for any history teacher or history student. 

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How is power divided in the United States government?

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-is-power-divided-in-the-united-states-government-belinda-stutzman Article II of the United States Constitution allows for three separate branches of government (legislative, executive, and judicial), along with a system of checks and balances should any branch get too powerful. Belinda Stutzman breaks down each branch and its constitutionally-entitled powers.

Lesson by Belinda Stutzman, animation by Johnny Chew.


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Kimberly (Pope) Kindred's curator insight, April 17, 2013 12:08 AM

TED ED is one of the best resources I found for my classes this year. Great way to supplement lessons and content.

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Dating in the 1940s

1947 Archival advice

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 2, 2013 12:25 PM

This video is a classic cultural production that is filled with unintented comedy for today's youth (and adults--I laughed plenty).  It does chronicle the some of the popular culture interactions among youth in that day and dating practices.  It also is a normative production designed to show how things should be within society.  This normative element of earlier TV products (like Leave it to Beaver and Father knows Best) means that they aren't prefect reflections of the society that produced them, but represent an idealized form that many believed should be the aspirational goals of society.