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BBC Launches Exhaustive Interactive World War I Resource | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

BBC Launches Exhaustive Interactive World War I Resource | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day… | US History | Scoop.it
RT @CanGeoEdu: BBC Launches Exhaustive Interactive World War I Resource http://t.co/A378eP6ZGo #wwi #ww1 #worldwarone #cdnhist #cdnhistory
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Rescooped by Mike Eveslage from World History - SHS
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Japanese WWII Soldier Who Hid In Jungle For 30 Years, Dies

Japanese WWII Soldier Who Hid In Jungle For 30 Years, Dies | US History | Scoop.it
Hiroo Onoda was an intelligence officer who came out of hiding on Lubang Island in the Philippines in 1974. He surrendered only when his former commander flew there to reverse his 1945 orders to stay behind.

Via Joy Kinley
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Joy Kinley's curator insight, January 17, 2014 9:15 AM

Imagine continuing to fight a war that had ended almost thirty years before - no contact with your friends and family - it is hard for most of us to understand his loyalty.

Nick Lesley's comment, February 10, 2014 8:18 PM
I think this article is very cool and is a fun read I just wish the article would have gone into more detail about the 30 years he did spend in the forest, how he survived and all but all I'm all
Nick Lesley's comment, February 10, 2014 8:19 PM
All in all it was interesting
Rescooped by Mike Eveslage from visualizing social media
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Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized in Twitter's Amazing Maps

Billions of Geotagged Tweets Visualized in Twitter's Amazing Maps | US History | Scoop.it

Ever wonder what it would look like to plot every single geotagged tweet since 2009 on a map? Twitter has done just that.

 

Twitter posted these maps of Europe, New York City, Tokyo and Istanbul on its blog Friday. They use billions of geotagged tweets: Every dot represents a tweet, with the brighter colors showing a higher concentration of tweets. It's pretty amazing how the mapped-out tweets clearly match with population centers, highways and the like — though perhaps that's obvious.


Via Lauren Moss
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Neil Ferree's curator insight, June 2, 2013 1:04 PM

Some smart guy said Twitter is not a Technology • It's a Conversation and will ocurr with or without you and knowing where the conversation is happening can be very useful to online marketers who use Twitter

Miles Gibson's curator insight, October 5, 2014 9:41 PM

Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives of Geography.                                 This is a map of all of the geotagged twitter posts from 2009 to now in the United States. Its shows population distribution and points of interest that people like to travel to. It shows dense population centers and highways. You can see the roads in the map because of space in the map not covered. The brighter colors are in higher population and more popular travel destinations. This is a map of many types.                                                                                                          This map is a part of unit 1 because it is a map of a basic geographic concept. This map is a functional map of sorts because it shows points of travel that people go to, but it is not varied by distance so it is not a precise version. This map is a definite example of a thematic map because it shows the story of the travel destinations of five years of their lives.            

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SoundCloud - Hear the world’s sounds

Explore the largest community of artists, bands, podcasters and creators of music & audio

Via Jukka Melaranta
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Is Andrew Johnson the worst president in American history?

Is Andrew Johnson the worst president in American history? | US History | Scoop.it
This weekend marks the birthday of perhaps the most-maligned president in American history. But was Andrew Johnson really that bad, or just the target of some second-guessing historians?

Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
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The Wizard of Oz and the 1896 Presidential Election

Excerpt from NPR program on the hypothesis that the book, The Wizard of Oz, was based on the 1896 presidential election and the controversy over gold vs. sil...

Via Mr. David Burton, Ms. Harrington, Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 22, 2013 2:23 PM

I have recently read the book the Wizard of Oz with my children and the book fits this hypothesis much more accurately than the movie does.  The Emerald City wasn't truly that color but everyone was force to wear emerald-colored glass (hence, they all believed that the ordinary things had extraordinary monetary value).

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 22, 2013 2:28 PM

Henry Littlefield's "Parable on Populism" covers this hypothesis in great detail and is worth the read. 

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, May 22, 2013 2:35 PM

I have been discussing this hypothesis with my classes for years..finally a short video to promote discussion!

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Virginia Pioneers - Virginia Genealogy: Digital Images of New Kent Co. VA Wills

Virginia Pioneers - Virginia Genealogy: Digital Images of New Kent Co. VA Wills | US History | Scoop.it

Via Derek Davey
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Derek Davey's curator insight, January 17, 2014 11:07 AM

Awesome stuff for us that do Virginia research.

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5 Good Resources for Historical Maps

5 Good Resources for Historical Maps | US History | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, October 3, 2013 5:13 PM

Looking for historical maps?  Five sites to find some primary sources for your classroom!

Rescooped by Mike Eveslage from Teaching history and archaeology to kids
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Melting glaciers in northern Italy reveal corpses of WW1 soldiers - Telegraph

Melting glaciers in northern Italy reveal corpses of WW1 soldiers - Telegraph | US History | Scoop.it
The glaciers of the Italian Alps are slowly melting to reveal horrors from the Great War, preserved for nearly a century

Via Louise Zarmati
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The Not-So-Accidental Racism of Post–Civil War Songs About the South

The Not-So-Accidental Racism of Post–Civil War Songs About the South | US History | Scoop.it
In the disastrous LL Cool J/Brad Paisley collaboration “Accidental Racist,” Paisley sort-of excuses his Confederate flag T-shirt by saying that he’s just a really big fan of Lynyrd Skynyrd.

Via Michael Miller
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The Progressive Era: The Great Age of Reform

By the 1900's America was a mixture of all people rich and poor. Cities were crowded with thousands and thousands of poor workers. Working conditions was very bad during this time. The Progressive movement was a result of all these bad things of this time. Since the political powers were unwilling or unable to address the rapid economic and social changes brought about by the industrial revolution in America, the progressive movement grew outside government and eventually forced government to take stands and deal with the growing problems.

 

 

By 1900 America was a tinderbox. Cities were crowded with millions of poor laborers, working conditions were appalling. From the local level to the highest institutions in the land corruption darkened politics. Something had to be done, and the progressive movement was the nation’s response. Although the progressive reformers did not fix everything, little escaped their attention. Since the political powers were unwilling or unable to address the rapid economic and social changes brought about by the industrial revolution in America, the progressive movement grew outside government and eventually forced government to take stands and deal with the growing problems.The year 1896 marks the approximate beginning of the Progressive Era, and reform peaked during the period before America’s entry into World War I in 1917. But in a larger sense, the reform impulse in America was present even in colonial times, and it continued into the modern era. Today few Americans would claim that this country provides a level playing field for all citizens and workers, or that our political system is free from corruption of one sort or another. Thus the progressive beat goes on.

During the “reckless decade” of the 1890s the impulse for reform was driven by the Populist Party, which was made up of farmers, small businessmen and reform-minded leaders who were willing to confront the growing problems in the country. The situation was summarized dramatically in the Populist Party platform, issued at its convention in Omaha in 1892, which read in part:

The conditions which surround us best justify our cooperation: we meet in the midst of a nation brought to the verge of moral, political, and material ruin. Corruption dominates the ballot-box, the legislatures, the Congress, and touches even the ermine of the bench. The people are demoralized; most of the States have been compelled to isolate the voters at the polling-places to prevent universal intimidation or bribery. The newspapers are largely subsidized or muzzled; public opinion silenced; business prostrated; our homes covered with mortgages; labor impoverished; and the land concentrating in the hands of the capitalists. The urban workmen are denied the right of organization for self-protection; imported pauperized labor beats down their wages; a hireling standing army, unrecognized by our laws, is established to shoot them down, and they are rapidly degenerating into European conditions. The fruits of the toil of millions are boldly stolen to build up colossal fortunes for a few, unprecedented in the history of mankind; and the possessors of these, in turn, despise the republic and endanger liberty. From the same prolific womb of governmental injustice we breed the two great classes—tramps and millionaires.

Even allowing for political hyperbole, the Populist claim was essentially true. The Populist Party, like many American institutions at that time, was divided internally over issues of race, geography, economic orientation, and general political loyalty. Although the Populists elected state and local officials, and affected legislation in local areas, their national impact was restricted by the usual limitations on third parties. But in that platform of 1892 they laid out a program of reform designed to help the small farmer, the small businessman and all others who saw themselves as victims of capitalist power. The party disappeared following the election of 1896, when they endorsed Democratic candidate William Jennings Bryan, who had addressed Populist concerns in his famous “Cross of Gold” speech. By tying themselves to a major party, the Populists lost their identity and went out of existence.

Nevertheless, by 1917 most of the concerns which the Populists had raised in 1892 had been addressed by the federal government. So the roots of progressivism can be found in the widespread discontent in the nation upon which the Populist Party was founded. Progressive leaders like Robert La Follette, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and others, while perhaps not specifically attuned Populist Party itself, were nevertheless acutely aware of the conditions that demanded reform. We should also keep in mind that the career of Franklin Roosevelt started during the Progressive Era, and the progressive ideas pursued by his cousin Theodore and President Wilson, under whom FDR served. Those ideas formed much of the basis of the New Deal programs which Franklin Roosevelt inaugurated upon becoming president in 1933.


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lexi shea's curator insight, February 11, 2015 1:46 PM

This says when he was president