US Government and World Cultural Geography
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Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It

Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"The images here, taken from the Instagram account @the.jefferson.grid show just a few of the landscapes that can be squeezed into the one-mile squares. The idea behind this sprawling checkerboard emerged after the Revolutionary War. As the United States expanded westward, the country needed a systematic way to divide its newly acquired lands. The original colonies were surveyed using the British system of 'metes and bounds,' with parcels delineated using local geography.  

 

That approach doesn’t scale very well, and Jefferson proposed to slice the young United States into gridded plots of land.  Jefferson's idea became a reality in 1785 when it was enacted as the Public Land Survey System. Today his grid covers much of the country, and it is still used to survey federal lands — an idea that shaped the physical landscape of half a continent."

 

Tags: images, land use, landscape, social media, planning, spatial, scale, historical.


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Dyna-e International's curator insight, September 1, 2015 12:32 PM

No such thing as being off the grid really. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:05 PM

unit 1 and 4

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See where women outnumber men around the world (and why)

See where women outnumber men around the world (and why) | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"A new study maps the population gaps between men and women around the world."

 


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Laura Lee Smith's comment, September 7, 2015 7:19 PM
This is actually something I discussed a while back with a friend of mine who is from Russia, how there is such a huge lack of marriageable men that women there consider being a mail order bride a good alternative to spinsterhood.
Laura Lee Smith's comment, September 7, 2015 7:19 PM
This is actually something I discussed a while back with a friend of mine who is from Russia, how there is such a huge lack of marriageable men that women there consider being a mail order bride a good alternative to spinsterhood.
Cohen Adkins's curator insight, September 8, 2015 4:59 PM

Its amazing how well balanced some countries are with the ratio of men to women how ever some of the 3rd world countries are off balance but not to an extreme.

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Infographic: The Syrian conflict

Infographic: The Syrian conflict | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Syria's civil war has inflicted a humanitarian crisis, expansive exodus of the population and a severe death toll. New Internationalist presents the facts in this zoomable infograph.

 

Tags: infographic, Syria, migration, political, refugees.


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Fran Martin's curator insight, September 18, 2015 6:29 AM

This might help if any questions come up, particularly if working with upper KS2 or beyond.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 23, 2015 3:54 PM

unit 2

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Fuzzy Borders

Tags: Canada, language, social media, images, place, culture, landscape, tourism. 


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Migrant crisis: Neighbours squabble after Croatia U-turn

Migrant crisis: Neighbours squabble after Croatia U-turn | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Croatia reverses its policy on allowing in migrants and instead transports hundreds northwards, angering Hungary and Slovenia.

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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 9:58 AM

The influx of Syrian refuges has caused a major controversy  in Europe. The crises has ripped open the hotly debated topic of immigration into Europe. Many nations are refusing to take the refuges in. Hungary and Slovenia have been two of the most vocal opponents of letting migrants and refuges into Europe. They are continuing to hold to their closed borders policy. Both nations have become angered by the Croatian governments recent decision to reverse course and allow refuges into their country. This topic will continue to be debated in Europe. In the United States the issue of Syrian refuges has also become a political issue. President Obamas decision to take in some refuges has caused a political controversy to erupt. Some on the right, including Donald Trump have come out against opening American borders to the refuges.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, October 26, 2015 1:02 PM

Croatia has reversed it's policy on the current migrant problem in Europe and the middle east. This is just a deplorable situation that seems to have no end in sight. While I understand the argument that other Islamic countries should be willing to take them, the current status quo simply can't be allowed to continue any longer.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 2:08 PM

of course Croatia has decided to let people through. they can only suffer if they try to stop migrants at their border, especially when the migrants are trying to get to countries to the north. if we compare the cost of trying and failing to keep out migrants and the cost of busing them to the northern boarder, we may find that the cost is smaller when they simply bus the migrants to the boarder and forget about them.

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How El niño affects commodity prices

"Cocoa, coffee and minerals are especially vulnerable to the weather pattern first named by Peruvian fishermen."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 1, 2015 2:14 PM

Geography is all about the finding the connections between seemingly unrelated issues. The geography of coffee is connected to weather, cultural, economic and many other geographies.  


Tags: environment, resources, economic, weather and climate, agriculture.

PSC AS Geography's curator insight, September 21, 2015 8:24 AM

Linking of El Nino weather patterns to commodities of food and metals.

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All the Countries of the World

All the Countries of the World | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Full album & lyrics: http://www.marblesthebrainstore.com/brain-beats-2 Music by Renald Francoeur, Drawing by Craighton Berman, Video by Don Markus “Tour the … Seth Dixon‘s insight: Geography is so much more than knowing where place are–but that is...

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Gender Gap Index

Gender Gap Index | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon‘s insight: According to the World Economic Forum (WEF), Scandinavia is the place to be.  This interactive map uses data that was compiled from an index to measure gender equality in health, access to education, economic participation and...

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Ship-Shipping Ships

Ship-Shipping Ships | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
“This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships.” Seth Dixon‘s insight: The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and technology.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the...

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megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:59 AM
Ships shipping ships shows how shipping product on ships is become such a huge aspect of production and transportation. It is not only time effective and you never have to worry about traffic, but it is also cheap to travel on the water.
Daniel Kalfas's curator insight, October 15, 2014 12:44 AM

Shipping is one of the biggest industries in the world economy, and has been used for anything from the transportation of food stuffs from one place to another, or the transportation of people from one place to another. However we are seeing a dwindling of the later, while the majority of our products have traveled over the water the majority of our people have not. This decline has happened mainly because of the invention of air travel. With the advent of air travel people are able to relocate and move to a new place within a matter of hours .   

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Teaching APHG with Live Web Maps

Teaching APHG with Live Web Maps | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Lyn Malone and Seth Dixon combined to present at NCGE 2015 on Saturday August 8th; the topic was Teaching AP Human Geography with Live Web Maps.

 

Tags: APHG, NCGE, training, edtech, GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 10, 2015 10:58 PM

I was glad to present in Washington D.C., and for any who could not attend, it was designed as a "first foray" into using ArcGIS online and chance to discover great web maps for every unit of APHG. 

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A Map of Baseball Nation

A Map of Baseball Nation | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"Fans may not list which team they favor on the census, but millions of them do make their preferences public on Facebook. Using aggregated data provided by the company, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes."


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Greg Russak's curator insight, April 29, 2014 12:53 PM

Maps and baseball - a good combination!

Wyatt Wolf's curator insight, October 30, 2014 7:46 PM

My favorite baseball team is the Philadelphia Phillies, here's everyone else's.

Global Speechwriter's comment, November 4, 2014 2:52 AM
Jays? C'mon.
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Japan banned from Antarctic whaling

Japan banned from Antarctic whaling | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
The UN's International Court of Justice rules that Japan must temporarily halt its whaling programme in the Antarctic.


It agreed with Australia, which brought the case in May 2010, that the  programme was not for scientific research as claimed by Tokyo. Japan said it would abide by the decision but added it "regrets and is deeply  disappointed by the decision". Australia argued that the programme was commercial whaling in disguise. The court's decision is considered legally binding. Japan had argued that the suit brought by Australia was an attempt to impose its cultural norms on Japan.


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10 All-American Foods That Foreigners Can't Stand

10 All-American Foods That Foreigners Can't Stand | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Red velvet cake does not sit well with many foreigners. They dislike it because it is packed with chemicals and food coloring. Many think that is tastes bland and that the only flavor coming through is the artificial coloring taste. They would much prefer a true chocolate or vanilla cake.

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Joy Kinley's curator insight, April 3, 2014 10:19 AM

Culture determines what food that you eat.  American foods are a blend of different cultures as well as convenience products.  The convenience foods are full of different chemicals and perservatives that alter the flavor of foods. 

Even for foods that we think would taste the same like chocolate there is a large difference in taste.  I agree that some of the things like grits or biscuits and gravy would seem odd if you hadn't grown up with them.  Red Velvet Cake (the only part I like about it is the Cream Cheese Icing) has a chemcial taste as does the cheese products, such as cheese in a can.

However just as foreigners don't like some American foods some foreign foods taste equally strange to Americans, even things that seem that they would taste the same such as soft drinks in other countries. 

However Peanut Butter and Jelly is wonderful (it is difficult to find peanut butter in many countries) but I agree that European chocolate is much tastier.

Mr. David Burton's comment, April 5, 2014 7:55 PM
But I oh so love everything on this list ... pfff :-)
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:45 AM

unit 3 & Unit 5

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Mount McKinley officially renamed Denali

Mount McKinley officially renamed Denali | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
To hear the White House describe Alaska, the state has become the canary in the climate change coal mine, complete with raging wildfires, accelerating ice melt in the arctic, vanishing glaciers and whole villages forced to relocate away from rising seas.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 1, 2015 4:12 PM

Most Alaskans already have shed the Mount McKinley name for over a generation, but as this National Geographic article points out, naming conventions matter and are filled with meaning.  Some of you might be wondering how it ever got called Mt. McKinley in the first place, but this action is still causing some political commotion.  Denali is a spectacularly gorgeous place, and there are a few other prominent mountains that some want to change to previous indigenous names although these changes are unlikely because they don't have the same local support and regular usage.     


Tags: place, language, toponyms, indigenous.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 2015 10:34 AM

Denali

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Teenage Girls Have Led Language Innovation for Centuries

Teenage Girls Have Led Language Innovation for Centuries | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
They've been on the cutting edge of the English language since at least the 1500s

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Woodstock School's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:22 AM

Do we speak their language?

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:03 PM

unit 3

Chris Costa's curator insight, September 9, 2015 2:37 PM

I find the social aspect of this absolutely fascinating; gender may be entirely a cultural construct, but we can see its influences in every aspect of human life. Women are responsible for 90 percent of linguistic changes that occur over the course of our lifetimes- because men resist such changes due to their (mostly) feminine origins. A good, witty read for those interested.

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Changes in Mortality: 1900 to 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 to 2010 | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"The New England Journal of Medicine looks at death reports in 200 years of back issues. The first thing to notice here is how much our mortality rate has dropped over the course of a century, largely due to big reductions in infectious diseases like tuberculosis and influenza."


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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 17, 2015 9:37 AM
Mortality
pascal simoens's curator insight, October 26, 2015 7:34 PM
A méditer
AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:12 PM

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer).  

 

Questions to Ponder: What geographic factors shape mortality rates and shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society today then before?  Has anything worsened?  How come?

 

Tagsmortality, medical, development, historical, USA, population, statistics, unit 2 population, infographic, models.

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How Not to Be Ignorant About the World

How much do you know about the world? Hans Rosling, with his famous charts of global population, health and income data (and an extra-extra-long pointer), demonstrates that you have a high statistical chance of being quite wrong about what you think you know. Play along with his audience quiz — then, from Hans’ son Ola, learn 4 ways to quickly get less ignorant.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 17, 2015 5:01 PM

Our preconceived notions of places, as well as some of the dominant narratives about regions, can cloud our understanding about the world today.  This video is a good introduction to the Ignorance Project which shows how personal bias, outdated world views and news bias collectively make combating global ignorance difficult.   However, the end of the video shows some good rules of thumb to have a more fact-based world view.  


Tagsstatistics, placeregions, media, models, gapminderdevelopment, perspective.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:32 PM

adicionar sua visão ...

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The World’s Congested Human Migration Routes in 5 Maps

The World’s Congested Human Migration Routes in 5 Maps | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"The desperate men, women, and children flooding into Europe from the Middle East and Africa are not the only people moving along ever-shifting and dangerous migration routes. Last year saw the highest levels of global forced displacement on record—59.5 million individuals left their homes in 2014 due to 'persecution, conflict, generalized violence, or human rights violations' according to the United Nations. That's 8.3 million more people than the year before."


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PSC AS Geography's curator insight, September 21, 2015 8:30 AM

Excellent links here to the population movement and global shift of people moving from 'Switched Off' to 'Switched On' and from developing to developed regions of Europe and North America.

Matthieu CLEMENT's curator insight, September 25, 2015 12:25 AM

Pour compléter et prolonger un petit peu notre dossier sur la crise des réfugiés en Europe. A analyser  une série de cartes dans l'article aux différentes échelles régionales.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 1, 2015 4:14 AM

The World’s Congested Human Migration Routes in 5 Maps

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Why is Geography Education so Important?

Why is Geography Education so Important? | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon‘s insight: This commencement speech from the President of the American Geographical Society highlights the importance of geographic thought and geo-literacy for college graduates.  I share this because (to quote Summer Howarth), “geo-literacy...

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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon‘s insight:
The PRB World Population Data Sheet is a great resource; now you can access that same data through this interactive map. 
See on www.prb.org

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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.
Seth Dixon‘s insight:
This video shows the place matters; a Washington D.C.

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Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:23 AM

Implications of various densities and distributions-

This article explains how in some different locations, their are very poor urban areas, that do not have grocery stores. This is called a Food Desert, which are located all across America, especially in Nevada.

This article shows how not all distributions and densities are organized, but they always do represent and depend on something, and in this case, it is Food Deserts and poor urban areas.

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Place-based Geography Videos

Place-based Geography Videos | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

Professor Seth Dixon shares over 50 of his favorite geography videos in this online map http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 2014 7:54 PM

Great site - showing locational context is important for not just Geography but every subject. How can we understand the complexities of topics like conflict or urban economies or agricultural histories.... without understanding locations and maps?

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:02 PM

It was nice to see where everything was happening. I hope it gets updated to more current events. I wish we had something like this when we were looking at the invasion of Kuwait.

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, March 15, 2015 5:19 PM

Seth Dixon uses ArgGIS to juxtapose maps with the location a video is associated with. 

 

This idea has crossed my mind before. Now, a video can be contemplated with the spatial accuracy needed. This connects events to a place, and can help students more fully grasp the geospatial distribution of events. 

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The World's Largest Trees

"The world's second-largest known tree, the President, in Sequoia National Park is photographed by National Geographic magazine photographer Michael 'Nick' Nichols for the December 2012 issue."


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Hemant Galviya's curator insight, April 17, 2014 2:55 AM

hiiiiiiiiiiii

Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, April 18, 2014 11:44 AM

Najväčšie stromy sveta.

Basant Kerketta's curator insight, April 21, 2014 4:26 AM

Magnificent !!!

These kind must be saved.

Wish I could plant and replicate this size and height here in my home town.

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How the Potato Changed the World

How the Potato Changed the World | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it
Brought to Europe from the New World by Spanish explorers, the lowly potato gave rise to modern industrial agriculture

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Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 2014 5:35 PM

Columbian Exchange Unit

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 12:57 PM

Potatoes are one of the most widespread foods in the world, due to its resiliency to harsh weather conditions and its ability to grow to large sizes. Potatoes can also be traced to show the beginning forces of globalization. Before modern communication and transportation technology, globalization occurred at a much slower rate. Globalization spread through trade routes in the forms of foods, resources, and therefore cultures and people. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:52 PM

The Colombian Exchange is a term that describes the most dramatic biologic transfer in history.  European explorers brought animals and agricultural items from the Old World to the New and subsequently brought back items from the New World back to the Old.  This exchange profoundly reshaped many societies as agricultural diffusion of the potato lead to the changes across northern Europe. 

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, diffusionhistorical colonialism, Europe

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Big History Project

Big History Project | US Government and World Cultural Geography | Scoop.it

"Consider the big questions about our Universe, our planet, life, and humanity. From the Big Bang to modern day to where we are going in the future, Big History covers it all."


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