US Economy
19 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Macro Challenge
Scoop.it!

The consumer price index was up 0.2% in September - FXstreet.com

The consumer price index was up 0.2% in September - FXstreet.com | US Economy | Scoop.it
The consumer price index was up 0.2% in September
FXstreet.com
Canada – The consumer price index was up 0.2% in September (consensus was expecting +0.1%), causing the year-on-year inflation rate to remain unchanged at 1.1%.
Macro Challenge's insight:

The county's inflation rate hasrisen .2% across September. This increase is not enough to change any policies but it does imply some economic growth. It also did not raise across all items in the CPI, and actually fell in clothing and recreation. This could mean some specific areas of the economy are running strong while others are not.

-Ian Cumberland 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Macro Challenge
Scoop.it!

Tumbling Gas Prices Have Helped Cushion The Economic Blow From The Government Shutdown

Tumbling Gas Prices Have Helped Cushion The Economic Blow From The Government Shutdown | US Economy | Scoop.it
The government shutdown took an estimated $24 billion out of the economy.
It could have been worse.
During the shutdown, gas prices saw solid declines. Between the week of Sept. 30 and Oct. 14, prices fell $0.07, to $3.35 from $3.42.
Macro Challenge's insight:
This article is an example of a positive occurrence that was observed recently, but that doesn't mean it was a result of the shutdown. This article gives an idea that there is more to market flux than just shifts government spending; this concept can be tough to grasp under the circumstances in which we are.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Macro Challenge from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

Fund Managers Still See December As Most Likely Timing For Fed Tapering Despite Crisis In Washington

Fund Managers Still See December As Most Likely Timing For Fed Tapering Despite Crisis In Washington | US Economy | Scoop.it
The BofA Merrill Lynch rates and FX strategy team has just published the results of its October fund-manager survey, which contains an interesting observation: Investors still view the December FOMC meeting as the most likely timeframe in which the...

Via Thomas Faltin
Macro Challenge's insight:

Public opinion is actually pretty divided over when the Fed will start the taper. Regardless, though, investors' expectations will probably affect their decisions and therefore have an impact on the economy.

 

-Katie

more...
Martin Eden's curator insight, October 21, 2013 10:11 AM

The government kicked the can down the road, not fixed the problem.  As QE continues, some are fearful of what will happen when the FED begins to taper.  Most fund managers believe that this will happen sometime in December, just in time for the government to kick the can further.


Brian Walters

efjinn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 8:58 PM

-Lucas

Gucci's Gold Capital's curator insight, October 23, 2013 9:22 AM

This is interesting because it constrasts the article Casey scooped, which said Fed Tapering would happen in March. I think December might be too soon for us to ease up on Quantitative Easing. After the government shutdown cutting off the money flowing into the economy might be more stressful than it usually is.

Scooped by Macro Challenge
Scoop.it!

The State Of American Jobs In 21 Charts

The State Of American Jobs In 21 Charts | US Economy | Scoop.it
The U.S. economy added only 148,000 jobs in September, missing analyst expectations of 180,000.
The generally lackluster report — delayed three weeks due to the government shutdown — upwardly revised last month's figure from 169,000 to 193,000.
Macro Challenge's insight:

These charts demonstrate positive shifts in the job market, but the positive shifts

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Macro Challenge from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
Scoop.it!

The Greatest Risk to the U.S. Economy Is Still the People in Charge Of It

The Greatest Risk to the U.S. Economy Is Still the People in Charge Of It | US Economy | Scoop.it
Reuters The 16-day shutdown of the federal government cost the U.S. economy billions of dollars in lost economic activity, from an idle district, to lost personal income and higher interest payments. But exactly how many billions did it cost?

Via Thomas Faltin
Macro Challenge's insight:

Basically we'd be doing much better if we could actually agree on a plan. Since our government has done a poor job, we have administrative lag. Not quite mass chaos, but definitely confusion. That said, our economy's recovering okay- it's mostly human errors, like the recent shutdown and its effects, that are getting in the way.

 

-Katie

more...
No comment yet.