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Rescooped by Richard Platt from Future Technology
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Cars without buttons? Consoles of the Future.

Cars without buttons?  Consoles of the Future. | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
Remember when your cell phone used to have one button for every number?  The phone in your hand today probably has at most one button and, of course, a smart touch screen.  That same technology for...

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

The vision of a vehicle interior without buttons and switches is becoming increasingly tangible. “This trend not only gives interior designers a new level of freedom; it also reduces the costs of producing functional elements,” states Mark Sankovitch, ENGEL North America President. (they manufacture injection molding machines and plastic processing technologies)  “We are already talking to various OEMs and automotive companies. In four to five years the first vehicles will be equipped with this sensitive surface technology,”

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Rescooped by Richard Platt from Technology in Business Today
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Are hydrogen cars the wave of the future? Toyota thinks so.

Are hydrogen cars the wave of the future? Toyota thinks so. | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
The current conventional wisdom is that plug-in electric vehicles will be the clean, sleek cars of tomorrow. Think of Tesla's Model S or Chevrolet's Volt. These cars get most of the media attention, and policymakers tend to toss tax breaks their way.

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

(from the Curator of IoT & Wearables):  More detail on Toyota's plans for Hydrogen powered vehilces

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rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, November 27, 2013 9:19 PM

I guess this is the next big revolution to take place in technology. Hydrogen is the best alternative to Hydrocarbons which cause a lot of pollution and greenhouse gases. Electric vehicles don't have the range although they are a viable alternative in cities. Hydrogen as such is highly volatile and it requires careful handling-this would include transporting it to refuelling  stations, and its transfer into the vehicles themselves. With time to come, all these issues will be addressed, I am sure.

Rescooped by Richard Platt from Technology in Business Today
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Electric 'Hypercar' Toroidion 1MW boasts 1,341 horsepower

Electric 'Hypercar' Toroidion 1MW boasts 1,341 horsepower | Low Power Heads Up Display | Scoop.it
The new all-electric Toroidion 1MW plans to compete against Tesla for dominance in the electric car market. But the car's price tag might scare off prospective buyers.

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

Pennanen's young company has been working on building this car and its new battery technology for the last four years. The company employs roughly 15 people and has been completely self-financed so far.  -  Pennanen's plan is to get enough interest, investment and orders to build 100 Toroidion 1MW cars and begin delivering them to customers in about two years. He hopes to ultimately mass produce the car, bring the price down significantly and sell it to all kinds of customers, especially those drivers that appreciate Teslas and other electric vehicles.

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Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s curator insight, May 12, 2:48 AM

At $1.5 million to $3.5 million each, not many people will be buying the all-electric, super high-tech Toroidion, a car originally designed to win Grand Prix races.  Perhaps, that's not the real  issue.  The real future of this experimental vehicle lies in the application of its cutting edge technology to other forms of transportation and even to powering businesses and apartment  complexes.  The key to understanding the Toroidion is its deep storage capacity battery which can be charged simply at home using ordinary plugs. Compared to batteries now used in electric cars, the Toroidion battery is simpler and lighter than its competition. This car may succeed, but not in the way its makers intended.  Aloha, Russ.