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The Architecture of the City
a closer look at urbanism and architecture
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POLLUTION-guzzling, Air-cleaning Buildings

POLLUTION-guzzling, Air-cleaning Buildings | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Seven million premature deaths in a single year were the result of air pollution exposure, the World Health Organization reported recently. That’s one in eight of total global deaths in 2012. This new finding doubles previous estimates, confirming that air pollution is now the world’s single largest environmental health risk. Cities around the world are increasingly turning to technology for solutions, and here are some of the most innovative designs...

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Norm Miller's curator insight, May 31, 8:46 AM

More integration with nature and more technology that caotures pollution.

Stephen Kavanagh's curator insight, June 1, 5:29 AM

We have a right to clean air!!! Support our environment!!!

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, June 30, 6:25 AM

Great synoptic links to the Technological fix unit in A2 Geography. Good case study for health risk management. Where does this fit on the Kuznet Curve?

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Des bétons INTELLIGENTS (+vidéo) ::: [Furturmag]

Des bétons INTELLIGENTS (+vidéo) ::: [Furturmag] | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Capable de réfléchir la lumière, de produire de l'électricité ou de s'autoréparer, le béton de demain aura des propriétés étonnantes. Découvrez le béton intelligent.

(...)


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Architecture That DRIVES Ecological Innovation

Architecture That DRIVES Ecological Innovation | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

A gallery of the buildings that house the industries working to preserve the planet's natural ecology.

 

We constantly hear about the "green revolution" in building, whether it's performative facades that reduce cooling needs or grey water recycling that cuts down on water usage. However, the drive to reduce our environmental impact isn't just about designing the next LEED Gold skyscraper.

Integral to our collective efforts are a unique set of green institutions and industries, all of which require special architecture to function. These organizations not only leave a light ecological footprint, they also find ways for us to do the same: whether reducing carbon emissions or engineering better seeds that can sustain our growing population. 

 

It's not just green design; it's design that promotes new ways of being green.


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Lili Dávila's curator insight, August 20, 2013 11:41 AM

LEED is old news, there are new ways of being green. 

Michaela Jansen's curator insight, August 28, 2013 11:48 PM

this is great, i think we all need to step it up and move forward from recycling and substituting materials. "Go big or go home," right? 

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Can Architects SOLVE Our Cities’ Pollution Problems?

Can Architects SOLVE Our Cities’ Pollution Problems? | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

As populations continue to move to urban areas, architects must address how their designs will impact the cities they are trying to improve— and those inhabitants whose access to clean air is determined by their proposals. How can architects best use design to repair the health of our cities?

 

Visit the article link for project links and an overview of some of the innovative ways architecture addresses climate change, air quality, emissions and is rethinking our cities through design, technology and new approaches to sustainable urbanism...


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ARUP's Urban Skyscraper: A Design Proposal for the Year 2050

ARUP's Urban Skyscraper: A Design Proposal for the Year 2050 | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

In the article entitled “It’s Alive,” the design team at engineering firm ARUP envision a city building in the year 2050 that includes flexible modular pods, urban agriculture, climate-conscious facades and intelligent building systems. ARUP hopes the proposal will ultimately answer the question, "As city living takes center stage, what will we come to expect from the design and function of urban structures and buildings?".

 

ARUP’s futuristic skyscraper will be a “smart” building that will plug into a smart urban infrastructure, and cater to an expanding and technological society. By 2050, the global population will reach nine billion, 75% of which will live in cities. Significantly, this date will also mark a generation of adults that have lived their entire lives engaging with smart devices and materials. The design theory is that the population of 2050 is likely to be in constant flux, and therefore buildings and materials that surround this urban lifestyle must also be capable of evolution and change.

ARUP has imagined a building of the future that produces more than it consumes. Alongside the sustainable construction, the design will feature photovoltaic capability to capture and transmit energy using on-site fuel cells. In addition, energy will be harnessed from elevators or similar internal systems, along with wind turbines and algae-producing bio-fuel pods...


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Mercor's curator insight, February 14, 2013 4:01 AM

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Duane Craig's curator insight, February 20, 2013 8:54 AM

Whike true sustainabiity in buildings is probably not possible, this moves closer to it.

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Solar Carve Tower at the High Line | Studio Gang Architects

Solar Carve Tower at the High Line | Studio Gang Architects | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Chicago-based architect, Jeanne Gang, just unveiled the latest project planned to border New York City’s beloved High Line. The 180,000 square-foot office tower with ground level retail will replace an existing, disused meatpacking plant along 10th Avenue between 13th and 14th streets. It will feature a glass facade that is intelligently shaped to avoid the disruption of light, air and views from the High Line.

The gem-like façade displays the exciting architectural potential of expanded notions of solar-driven zoning—and a skyscraper that enhances the public life of the city in ways that a stand-alone icon cannot. 

Dubbed the Solar Carve Tower, the mid-rise structure is currently pending city approval and is planned for completion in 2015.


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Four Environmental Innovations that have Revolutionized Architecture

Four Environmental Innovations that have Revolutionized Architecture | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

The green revolution has impacted almost every sector of the economy. Now, eco-friendly technology is revolutionizing the way we think about architecture. Every part of the architectural process is undergoing huge changes.
When people think of green architecture, they often picture simple modifications, such as the substitution of environmentally friendly materials for less sustainable ones. While this can certainly be a viable means of reducing a project’s carbon footprint, it is by no means the only way to make a positive impact. Often, the best green projects are the ones that go above and beyond, completely altering the way people think of architecture as a whole. The following are just a few of the spectacular developments taking place in architecture today.

 

∞ Vertical Gardens

∞ Disaster-Resistant Buildings

∞ Walkable Roofs

∞ Garden Skyscrapers


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Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 28, 2013 5:49 PM
This idea is pretty cool. With all the pollution we have in the world today we need to start replanting the trees and plants we have tore down. Especially since more people are wanting to live in the big cities making the cities larger decreasing on our natural environment.
A. Perry Homes's curator insight, July 24, 6:20 PM

These are beautiful ways to combine urban and natural environments. 

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Biomorphic House by Pavie Architects & Design

Biomorphic House by Pavie Architects & Design | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Biomorphic House with organic skin designed by Pavie Architects & Design has aerodynamic shapes, and is situated 1000 meters over the Mediterranean Sea. It's formed to withstand winter storms perfectly and provides enough windows with transparent photovoltaic-cells to secure power sufficient for the heating, and electricity needs. The interior design is the natural extension of the inside of the skin. Free shaped floors, walls and ceilings give the feeling of a super luxurious space ship.

This pilot project, through a self-powered water electrolyze process, converts the obtained energy to hydrogen and saves it for a future use. Later, a hydrogen powered PEM-Fuel-Cell generator can supply electricity to the house, releasing pure water and reusable heat as side-products...


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Industry + INGENUITY: 7 Silo Transformations that Fill Empty Voids with New Life

Industry + INGENUITY: 7 Silo Transformations that Fill Empty Voids with New Life | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it
How can one transform a collection of concrete tubes into a site for experiencing contemporary culture?

That was the question posed by British architect and artist Thomas Heatherwick of Heatherwick Studio, whose imaginative designs can be found everywhere from Manchester to Shanghai. Heatherwick is used to creating striking sculptures on a grand scale, but his latest proposal is larger than any before—he plans to carve an art museum from the depths of an old silo in South Africa’s capital city, Cape Town. The building is a monumental sculpture in itself, and Heatherwick’s challenge was twofold: protect and celebrate the heritage of the city’s industrial past while simultaneously creating something wholly new within the inherited structure.


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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, March 22, 5:47 PM

Dar nueva vida a los silos; soluciones de todo tipo para todo tipo de usos. Algunos de los proyectos, muy interesantes.

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Materials Of The FUTURE: 7 Amazing Trends For 2014 And Beyond

Materials Of The FUTURE: 7 Amazing Trends For 2014 And Beyond | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

The history of architecture is deeply engrained in technological developments of the time. Skyscrapers would have never reached such heights without developments in steel, for example, and facades would have never slimmed down without thin-shell concrete.


In a time that is so buzzing with technological development, we cannot help but salivate a little at the material prospects for architecture that are just on the horizon. With 2014 just beginning, we want to take a moment to see what drastic innovations may be leaking into the world of architecture in the near future.


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A Skyscraping, VERTICAL Farm Tower Concept

A Skyscraping, VERTICAL Farm Tower Concept | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Although China has the largest agricultural output in the world, supporting more than 20% of the world’s population, only 15% of its land can be cultivated, of which only 1.2% permanently supports crops. The total land area used for farming is also set to fall as more and more land is used for development, though Spanish architectural firm Javier Ponce Architects has come up with an innovative solution. 

Its design concept, titled ‘Dynamic Vertical Networks’, consists of 615-foot tall structures to be used as farms located in close proximity to urban areas like Hong Kong, in order to keep food distribution costs low. The structures will be made of lightweight, recycled metallic materials, in a shifting floorplate design inspired by “traditional shifting terrace concepts in Chinese rice farming”. Crops would be grown hydroponically, to create a soil-free environment. The plants will benefit from high levels of natural sunlight from the unobstructed, open design. 


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Gardens By The Bay: Singapore's Most Brilliant Architectural Innovation

Gardens By The Bay: Singapore's Most Brilliant Architectural Innovation | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Gardens by the Bay is the newest addition to Singapore's green space innovations, making this architecturally brilliant metropolis truly a “City in a Garden.”

Still a work in progress, Gardens by the Bay was named the World Building of the Year at the World Architecture Festival 2012. The use of innovative energy saving technologies is a noteworthy element of this unique project.

More than 217,000 plants belonging to approximately 800 species and varieties are represented in the Gardens “with the hope that it will help to promote awareness of the wonders of nature and the value of plants to Man and the environment.” In this way, visitors are instilled with new or renewed awareness of plants, while experiencing different ecosystems without disturbing original forests. Gardens by the Bay also supports the sustainability of culture through a wide array of “edutainment” available onsite — from school programs to concerts  – to further enhance an understanding of this experience...


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Chia Yi Xuan's curator insight, June 29, 2013 8:40 AM

From this article, I can see that Singapore's architectural design of the Gardens by the Bay has been known and that people find it very innovative and fascinating. It was named the World Building of the Year in the year 2012. I think that the Gardens by the Bay is a very good idea as it can attract tourists and draw international attention.It also make Singapore known to more countries.I wonder if the people in the other countries will find it fascinating and a joy to see this architectural innovation.

Tan Teck Ling's curator insight, June 30, 2013 6:24 AM

This is my insight using See-Think-Wonder routine,

I can see from this article that Singapore has gained some recognition for its attempt to built a creative and interesting architecture while ensuring it to be Eco-friendly.
I think that this type of architectures are beneficial to everybody as it provides shelter for people while ensuring that the building is a great attraction through the usage of a large variety of plants that is Eco-friendly.
I wonder what would Singapore come up with that would allow it to gain such recognition once again by others 

RuiHan Chia's curator insight, June 30, 2013 6:59 AM

I see that Singapore 's new addition, Gardens by the Bay, has already drawn international attention and was named the World Building of the Year at the World Architecture Festival 2012. I think that Gardens by the Bay is good because it promotes energy saving and is a great tourist attraction and showcases many different plants and habitats. It also has great potential since it is not complete yet. I wonder how it will change as it is being completed.

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Crystal clear: the case for green building

Crystal clear: the case for green building | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Part office, part exhibition space, a new London landmark aims to challenge our assumptions about green design.

 

A new building in east London’s Royal Victoria Docks aims to change public perceptions of green architecture – while trialling some new sustainable technologies and approaches at scale. There’s not a green roof or thick insulated wall in sight. In fact, the structure, which is called the Crystal, is everything we’ve come to believe a sustainable building shouldn’t be: lightweight, angular, glazed from top to bottom and with a roof made out of steel.

Part office space, part interactive exhibition about the future of cities, the building is intended as a living experiment in sustainability that business leaders, politicians and the general public alike can learn from. “The building is a great demonstration of the ‘art of the possible’”, says Martin Hunt, Head of Networks and Partnerships at Forum for the Future. “It’s refreshing to see an interactive exhibition that visualises what our cities could be like – based on high quality research and thoughtful benchmarking. It brings the big issues of urban living – such as water and energy consumption, public health and safety – to life in a way that engages people and inspires them.”


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Duane Craig's curator insight, January 7, 2013 7:13 AM

It's quite enlightening, as pointed out here, that a lot of glass used correctly can actually yield a zero energy building. But I agree that assessing the true sustainability of the building would have to factor in all the embodied fossil fuel and other energy used to make its components. And when you're talking about glass, that could be huge.

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CO2ngress Towers: Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness

CO2ngress Towers:  Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

“Every day, 77,000 carbon-emitting vehicles fly past the Congress Parkway interchange, polluting the air. This project creates a gateway over the corridor that filters air and fuels a new breed of car for its residents.”

Aimed to increase public awareness and improve public health, the CO2ngress Gateway Towers absorb the CO2 emissions from passing cars, which is fed to algae grown in the building. The algae then helps with the processing of biofuels which supply the building residents’ eco-friendly cars.

The two towers split and converge at the top to create an iconic gateway to the city. A bridge joins the two towers and contains a public restaurant with views of neighboring buildings. Pedestrian connections are landscaped at the base, giving a human scale to a car-centric urban identity.

Additionally, the double-skin facade helps reduce traffic noise and offers enclosed balconies. Natural cross-ventilation of the units is enabled through the building’s atrium. The terraces are enclosed by bio-reactor tubes which grow the algae responsible for biofuel processing...


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Samantha Hedrick's curator insight, October 2, 2013 5:31 PM

I thought that this article was really cool that Chicago was going to build these towers as the gateway to this city. At the same time, I thought it was cool that it acts as a CO2 remover. It sucks up the carbon dioxide from the vehicles of the city and gets rid of it. I think it would be great if other cities could do this also to reduce the pollution.

Kenzie Nossaman's comment, October 4, 2013 6:19 AM
After reading this article I thought it was really cool that Chicago is trying to make a difference. I didn't know that a simple building could make should a huge difference. This article is very interesting!
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Attuned to Nature... The Endesa Pavilion

Attuned to Nature... The Endesa Pavilion | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

The Endesa Pavilion is a progressive prototype that explores the potential of replicating natural processes via digital coding to accomplish accurate and desired results.

With a multitude of workshops, news bulletins, symposiums, et all propounding the intelligent use of natural resources world over, there are several diligent minds painstakingly ticking on actually accomplishing the needful. The Institute of Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC) with a ‘projects’ division headed by architect Rodrigo Rubio has created a research prototype of a new self-sufficient solar-optimized prefabricated skin system...


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5 Ways Architecture Can Respond To Rising Sea Levels

5 Ways Architecture Can Respond To Rising Sea Levels | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it
With water levels set to rise, how will buildings adapt to this changing environment? Here's a roundup of some innovative solutions.

 

One of the many problems that will accompany this catastrophe is a rise in sea levels due to the melting polar ice caps. Coastal cities and towns are obviously the ones under the greatest threat but so are low-lying lands. We could be saying goodbye to the Netherlands as we know it. So, unless our next evolutionary step is to grow gills then we’re going to have to face up to the facts and find new ways to live within our watery environment.

Before we all run for the hills there are ways that architecture can integrate the design of buildings into their aquatic surroundings, giving us the possibility of living with this new world. So, with that in mind, lets take a look at some potential architectural solutions...


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