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The Architecture of the City
a closer look at urbanism and architecture
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[Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam] Stacking Green by Vo Trong Nghia Architects

[Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam] Stacking Green by Vo Trong Nghia Architects | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Description from the architects:

 

The house is constructed on the plot 4m wide and 20m deep. The front and back facades are composed of layers of concrete planters cantilevered from two sidewalls. To water plants, the automatic irrigation pipes inside the planters were installed. Rainwater is collected in the tank and pumped up for this irrigation system.

 

The green facade and roof garden protect its inhabitants from direct sunlight, street noise and pollution. According to the post-occupancy measurement of the indoor environment, wind flows throughout in the house thanks to the porous façades and 2 skylights. This result was already proven by the behavior of the inhabitants; they scarcely use the air conditioner even in the tropical climate, their electricity fees are just 25USD per month, thanks to the wind flow and other passive design methods.


Via Lauren Moss
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ParadigmGallery's comment, January 28, 11:39 AM
this project accomplishes so much...architecture incorporating the plants so successfully, minimal interior and perfect furniture choices...stairs great....
Rescooped by association concert urbain from sustainable architecture
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Climate-responsive architecture: Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

Climate-responsive architecture: Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Villa 921 is a single-story concrete house designed to protect residents from extreme climate conditions. Located in Japan, at a remote island accessible only by boat, this unique home was designed by Harunatsu-Archi. 

Architecturally, wood and glass walls slide open across the front and rear of the building, allowing the wind to move through the spaces for natural ventilation, while projecting canopies shade the rooms and terrace from the harsh sun. During typhoons, the house and terrace can be screened behind protective coverings, which fasten onto the protruding eaves...

 

More from the architects:

“The usable area of the house only amounts to about 70 square metres,” said architects Shoko Murakaji and Naoto Murakaji. “This is by no means large, but thanks to the amazing views of the landscape, there is never a feeling of narrowness.”


Via Lauren Moss
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