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The Architecture of the City
a closer look at urbanism and architecture
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Morphosis’s Emerson College Los Angeles Building set to open in March

Morphosis’s Emerson College Los Angeles Building set to open in March | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it
The project gives the Boston-based communications and arts school a permanent home on the west coast.

The 10-story, $85 million project will accommodate 217 students in suite-style housing located in the two vertical towers. These living spaces flank the academic and administrative core, which include classrooms, a state-of-the-art digital screening room, a lecture hall with distance-learning capabilities, performance spaces, editing suites, and more. 

Designed by architect Thom Mayne of Morphosis, the dynamic, aluminum-clad structure—really a self-contained campus—stands poised to become a symbol of its rapidly changing neighborhood.

Technological innovations echo the school’s own zeitgeist. Among the building’s energy-saving systems are exterior louvers that open or close automatically in response to the weather and the sun’s intensity. And two intriguing metal scrims, made from 17 different aluminum shapes that were digitally generated and manufactured, shade the interior faces of the residential towers.


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Catherine Devin's curator insight, March 14, 2014 9:59 AM

Sustainability will progress  if  embedded  in universities and school programs... as mentioned earlier in the article on Business Schools ( Sce : Guardian)

What a great experience to be able to live a few years in a sustainable building, if  occupants promote simultaneously  green behaviours.

Lola Ripollés's curator insight, March 14, 2014 11:48 AM

I found this project really amazing!

Designed by architect Thom Mayne of Morphosis, the dynamic, aluminum-clad structure—really a self-contained campus—stands poised to become a symbol of its rapidly changing neighborhood.

Technological innovations echo the school’s own zeitgeist. Among the building’s energy-saving systems are exterior louvers that open or close automatically in response to the weather and the sun’s intensity. And two intriguing metal scrims, made from 17 different aluminum shapes that were digitally generated and manufactured, shade the interior faces of the residential towers.

scarlettarch's curator insight, March 14, 2014 9:29 PM

The Boston- LA film connection just solidified a little more.

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Ecorium of the National Ecological Institute, South Korea

Ecorium of the National Ecological Institute, South Korea | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

The Ecorium of the National Ecological Institute in Seocheon-gun, South Korea promotes a design concept by SAMOO Architects and Engineers that reflects three key concepts:

"From the Nature," "Be the Nature," & "With the Nature." 

 

The first is expressed by the dynamic, organic lines of the Institute and its grounds.  The second uses cutting-edge technology to recreate ecological environments by aligning greenhouses with the optimal amount of sunlight for each one.  The third includes visitors who immerse themselves in the complex ecological experience.  The Ecorium is poised to become a landmark in green research, education, and exhibitions.


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Joseph Vancell's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:33 PM

Wow! Sustainable architecture in South Korea

Mark Warren's curator insight, January 17, 2014 3:40 AM

Wow!

Mae Hughes/Lauryn Macias's curator insight, October 27, 2014 7:04 PM

We chose this article to be in the Intellectual/Arts category because it is about improvement of education. This article is about the National Ecological Institute in Seocheon-gun, South Korea which is an institute of ecology that focuses on 3 main concepts: "With the Nature," "From the Nature," and "Be the Nature" Its main goal is to become a "landmark in green research, education, and exhibitions." It looks like this landmark will help South Korea improve its knowledge in Ecological studies.

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Taiwanese Wind Tower is Covered with Thousands of Wind Turbines and LED Lights

Taiwanese Wind Tower is Covered with Thousands of Wind Turbines and LED Lights | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it
Beijing-based Decode Urbanism Office has designed a tower with a façade composed of multiple wind-driven generators.

 

Thousands of wind turbines will produce enough energy to power the entire building. At night, the diamond-shaped generators are lit with thousands of LED lights incorporated into the building envelope.

The 350-meter (1,150-foot) structure, in Taichung City, China, will house the city’s Department of Urban Development, as well as commercial activities.

The tower’s façade, inspired by the plum blossom — China and Taiwan's  national flower – reacts to changes in direction and intensity of the wind, creating a truly dynamic visual effect. Similarly, mechanical wind power generators have LEDs, illuminating the façade and producing a pulsating flow of light, whose intensity and color adjust to correspond to changes in temperature and season.

 

The wind harnessing capability, along with the lighting that responds to local atmospheric conditions, makes this conceptual tower a true “decoder of nature.”


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Federico Morabito's comment, May 18, 2013 5:41 AM
This is an example of "Smart Progress" is in an effort to channel the interests of research towards evolutionary solutions, through systematic monitoring of the quality process of mental and physical state of the individual with the 'environment.
Edmund Chan's comment, May 19, 2013 12:45 AM
What about routine maintenance ?
Clem Stanyon's comment, May 30, 2013 11:17 PM
Fantastic!
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Agora Tower, Taipei: A Twisting Skyscraper Wrapped With Vertical Gardens

Agora Tower, Taipei: A Twisting Skyscraper Wrapped With Vertical Gardens | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Taipei just broke ground on a twisting skyscraper that is wrapped with a jungle of vertical gardens...

Designed by Vincent Callebaut Architecture, the 455,000-square-foot Agora Tower will have an orchard, a vegetable garden, space for aromatic and medicinal plants, and a compost and rainwater capture system.

Designed to mimic two encircling hands and the helical structure of DNA, the towers are organized a central core that allows for a “hyper-abundance of suspended gardens.” These will spill over with edible and decorative plants, enabling residents of 40 luxury apartments to harvest a great deal of their own food (except for protein.) Plus, the rainwater capture system alleviates pressure on the municipal water supply and gives the complex even greater independence.

Each 540 square meter apartment will have an interior green wall as well, ensuring optimum air quality and a great green aesthetics. A circular light funnel will push daylighting right down to the basement of the building, a solar roof will provide energy, and low E glass will mitigate excess solar gain and prevent thermal loss.

Complete with nanotechnology and a host of other high-tech features, this one-of-a-kind tower may well be the greenest of its kind when it is completed circa 2016....


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Pagina Uno's curator insight, March 10, 2013 6:10 AM

Progettato per imitare la struttura elicoidale del DNA, le torri sono organizzate intorno ad un nucleo centrale che ha permesso la realizzare un "iper-abbondanza di giardini sospesi." Questi traboccano di piante commestibili e decorative, che consentono ai residenti dei 40 appartamenti di lusso di raccogliere una grande quantità di cibo. Inoltre, un sistema di raccolta delle acque piovane allevia il peso sulla rete idrica comunale e dà indipendenza al complesso.

Bubba Muntzer's comment, March 10, 2013 1:30 PM
This is a real fad now, skyscrapers that twist toward the sky like that, isn't it? I can't help but wonder about the legacy. Are we entering a new era where the species is losing its self consciousness, or have these architects simply not heard the old limerick about the heartbreak when the man who was threaded one way fell in love with the woman who was threaded the other way?
Backbone's curator insight, September 13, 2014 7:54 AM

more constructions like this expected in near future !

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Solar Carve Tower at the High Line | Studio Gang Architects

Solar Carve Tower at the High Line | Studio Gang Architects | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Chicago-based architect, Jeanne Gang, just unveiled the latest project planned to border New York City’s beloved High Line. The 180,000 square-foot office tower with ground level retail will replace an existing, disused meatpacking plant along 10th Avenue between 13th and 14th streets. It will feature a glass facade that is intelligently shaped to avoid the disruption of light, air and views from the High Line.

The gem-like façade displays the exciting architectural potential of expanded notions of solar-driven zoning—and a skyscraper that enhances the public life of the city in ways that a stand-alone icon cannot. 

Dubbed the Solar Carve Tower, the mid-rise structure is currently pending city approval and is planned for completion in 2015.


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[Norway] Sustainable Technology at the National Museum of Art, Architecture & Design in Oslo, Norway

[Norway] Sustainable Technology at the National Museum of Art, Architecture & Design in Oslo, Norway | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

 

The new Museum of Modern Art needed to address the role and function of art in Oslo's city center, as a place for the interpretation of both the historical and contemporary reality. The museum uses twisted geometry standing on a massive footing to introduce series of event spaces, from landscape to interior exhibition to roofscape.

 

Facing the water front the massing rises and pedestrians are invited into the area through multiple accesses on the landscape, leading to the radial center of the museum lobby. The volume creates a protected plaza, or canopy for temporary outside exhibitions.

 

Sustainability: The technology came in the form of self-compacting concrete in which chemical additives are introduced into the concrete mix, significantly increasing its workability without any resultant loss in strength. The project is conceived like a bridge. Sustainable design integrates environmental, economic, and social issues of sustainability together with users’ goals and needs. The NMAAD Museum employs sustainable design to reduce energy consumption, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, encourage water conservation, and provide high indoor environmental quality.


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Attuned to Nature... The Endesa Pavilion

Attuned to Nature... The Endesa Pavilion | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

The Endesa Pavilion is a progressive prototype that explores the potential of replicating natural processes via digital coding to accomplish accurate and desired results.

With a multitude of workshops, news bulletins, symposiums, et all propounding the intelligent use of natural resources world over, there are several diligent minds painstakingly ticking on actually accomplishing the needful. The Institute of Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC) with a ‘projects’ division headed by architect Rodrigo Rubio has created a research prototype of a new self-sufficient solar-optimized prefabricated skin system...


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Stunning wood-clad house in Chile...

Stunning wood-clad house in Chile... | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Metamorphosis 1 is the remodel of a home in Chile by architects Jose Ulloa Davet + Delphine Ding. The project is organized according to a helical path which, through the extension of an existing deck and the overhang of the new room, allows the user to go up to two new panoramic terraces on the house.

The skin on the project is designed as an autonomous unit, through modulated square openings with measures based on a 30 centimeters module and a skin with a changing rhythm. New areas of the house blend into the existing through the ventilated timber skin, whose function is to avoid accumulations of water and moisture in the structure wall...


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Biomorphic House by Pavie Architects & Design

Biomorphic House by Pavie Architects & Design | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Biomorphic House with organic skin designed by Pavie Architects & Design has aerodynamic shapes, and is situated 1000 meters over the Mediterranean Sea. It's formed to withstand winter storms perfectly and provides enough windows with transparent photovoltaic-cells to secure power sufficient for the heating, and electricity needs. The interior design is the natural extension of the inside of the skin. Free shaped floors, walls and ceilings give the feeling of a super luxurious space ship.

This pilot project, through a self-powered water electrolyze process, converts the obtained energy to hydrogen and saves it for a future use. Later, a hydrogen powered PEM-Fuel-Cell generator can supply electricity to the house, releasing pure water and reusable heat as side-products...


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Materials Of The FUTURE: 7 Amazing Trends For 2014 And Beyond

Materials Of The FUTURE: 7 Amazing Trends For 2014 And Beyond | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

The history of architecture is deeply engrained in technological developments of the time. Skyscrapers would have never reached such heights without developments in steel, for example, and facades would have never slimmed down without thin-shell concrete.


In a time that is so buzzing with technological development, we cannot help but salivate a little at the material prospects for architecture that are just on the horizon. With 2014 just beginning, we want to take a moment to see what drastic innovations may be leaking into the world of architecture in the near future.


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SHADE: A Solar Home ADAPTS for Sustainable Desert Living

SHADE: A Solar Home ADAPTS for Sustainable Desert Living | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Team ASUNM, a collaborative effort between Arizona State University and University of New Mexico, has come together to address the inefficiencies of urban sprawl and to create a model for sustainable desert living, dubbed SHADE (Solar Home Adapting for Desert Equilibrium), which is an entry in the Solar Decathlon 2013 competition that takes place on October 3-13, 2013 in Irvine, California.

 

Using external vertical screens and a solar canopy for shade, the SHADE home experiences a stable, consistent temperature with the use of a radiant cooling system used alongside an air cooling unit. Team ASUNM is exploring the residential application of thermal storage to chill water at night to create ice that cools a glycol solution during the day.


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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, July 18, 2013 4:15 AM

Exploring the deserts as a place to live may be a trend for the next decades or centuries. Here is one of the best approaches

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com | www.theendoffacebook.com

gawlab's curator insight, July 18, 2013 3:28 PM

would love to know about existence of such solutions in Africa..

http://youtu.be/3AvjpnYE1gQ

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New NASA Base Shapes the Future of Green Building Technology

New NASA Base Shapes the Future of Green Building Technology | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

NASA's new Sustainability Base was designed by William McDonough + Partners to embody the spirit of NASA while fostering collaboration, supporting health and well-being, and exceeding the requirements of LEED® Platinum.

An exoskeleton approach provides for structural stability during seismic events, facilitates glare-free daylighting and shading, natural ventilation and connection to the outdoors, and flexibility of the workspace with its column-free interior.

Atop the two-story 50,000-square-foot building is a solid-oxide fuel cell and rooftop solar arrays, supplying the building with more energy than it requires and sending surplus back to the grid at Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Currently running on natural gas, the fuel cell is ready to be converted to landfill gas when a source is available...


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Norm Miller's curator insight, May 14, 2013 10:48 AM

Very cool integration of technologies and here we see an emphasis on work environments as well wit a lot of collaborative space, no pun intended.

RealCorp.lu's curator insight, May 23, 2013 2:42 AM

Un nouvel exemple de batiment "green".

Sumaiya Banu's curator insight, August 23, 2013 1:34 AM

Software as a Service (SaaS) is the next generation technology that is being embraced widely by businesses today as it is cost efficient, maintenance free, flexible, and adaptable. PeopleWorks’ SaaS based application and software solutions with its cloud based platform offers mobility and ease of use, and can be accessed by employees anywhere and at any time. This helps businesses reduce turnaround time and save costs.

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ARUP's Urban Skyscraper: A Design Proposal for the Year 2050

ARUP's Urban Skyscraper: A Design Proposal for the Year 2050 | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

In the article entitled “It’s Alive,” the design team at engineering firm ARUP envision a city building in the year 2050 that includes flexible modular pods, urban agriculture, climate-conscious facades and intelligent building systems. ARUP hopes the proposal will ultimately answer the question, "As city living takes center stage, what will we come to expect from the design and function of urban structures and buildings?".

 

ARUP’s futuristic skyscraper will be a “smart” building that will plug into a smart urban infrastructure, and cater to an expanding and technological society. By 2050, the global population will reach nine billion, 75% of which will live in cities. Significantly, this date will also mark a generation of adults that have lived their entire lives engaging with smart devices and materials. The design theory is that the population of 2050 is likely to be in constant flux, and therefore buildings and materials that surround this urban lifestyle must also be capable of evolution and change.

ARUP has imagined a building of the future that produces more than it consumes. Alongside the sustainable construction, the design will feature photovoltaic capability to capture and transmit energy using on-site fuel cells. In addition, energy will be harnessed from elevators or similar internal systems, along with wind turbines and algae-producing bio-fuel pods...


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Mercor's curator insight, February 14, 2013 7:01 AM

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Duane Craig's curator insight, February 20, 2013 11:54 AM

Whike true sustainabiity in buildings is probably not possible, this moves closer to it.

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New green design methods to revolutionize the building industry...

New green design methods to revolutionize the building industry... | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it


If you want a preview of the downtown Vancouver streetscape in 2035, start with a walk down Granville or Georgia Street today.


Most of the buildings will still be standing. There will be additions and replacements, but most of the changes that will transform downtown's living, work and retail space will be undetectable from the sidewalk. That includes upgrades to water and energy systems in buildings that in 2012 are models of inefficiency by contemporary standards, let alone future ones.

"If you are thinking 2035, realistically 80% of the buildings that will be in existence at that time have already been constructed," said Innes Hood, a professional engineer and senior associate with Stantec Consulting, a consulting firm with 12,000 planners, architects, engineers, project managers and experts, working in teams to break down the boundaries between designers, contractors and investors, while using advanced computer modelling programs.

 

Retrofits are crucial.

One of Hood's main assignments is overseeing the redevelopment of existing buildings. More often than not, that means uncovering, through energy audits, glaring examples of waste - air leaks, inadequate insulation, inefficient heating and ventilation systems.

"We are involved in residential projects where we can achieve 80-per-cent reduction in energy use and become essentially greenhouse gas neutral through the implementation of cost-effective technologies," Hood said. "We're not having to strive to the leading edge. These are tried and true technologies around good building enclosures and high-performance mechanical systems such as heat pump technology...


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Four Environmental Innovations that have Revolutionized Architecture

Four Environmental Innovations that have Revolutionized Architecture | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

The green revolution has impacted almost every sector of the economy. Now, eco-friendly technology is revolutionizing the way we think about architecture. Every part of the architectural process is undergoing huge changes.
When people think of green architecture, they often picture simple modifications, such as the substitution of environmentally friendly materials for less sustainable ones. While this can certainly be a viable means of reducing a project’s carbon footprint, it is by no means the only way to make a positive impact. Often, the best green projects are the ones that go above and beyond, completely altering the way people think of architecture as a whole. The following are just a few of the spectacular developments taking place in architecture today.

 

∞ Vertical Gardens

∞ Disaster-Resistant Buildings

∞ Walkable Roofs

∞ Garden Skyscrapers


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Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 28, 2013 8:49 PM
This idea is pretty cool. With all the pollution we have in the world today we need to start replanting the trees and plants we have tore down. Especially since more people are wanting to live in the big cities making the cities larger decreasing on our natural environment.
A. Perry Homes's curator insight, July 24, 2014 9:20 PM

These are beautiful ways to combine urban and natural environments. 

Zoya Ayaz's curator insight, September 9, 2014 8:24 AM

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Chun Qing Li's Sustainable Pavilion Unveiled at London Design Festival

Chun Qing Li's Sustainable Pavilion Unveiled at London Design Festival | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it
KREOD pavilion in Greenwich by local architect Chun Qing Li and featuring an intricate FSC Norwegian wood design opens up for London Design Festival 2012.

A new architectural landmark for East London was unveiled at this year's bustling London Design Festival. Located in a green-walled square at the Greenwich Peninsula, the KREOD pavilion consists of three interconnected pods made from Tensile fabric and an award-winning sustainable wood called Kebony. Inspired by nature and intricate in its design, this mobile, durable pavilion by Chun Qing Li, sets a new standard for sustainable thinking in the digital age.

Designed to resemble three giant seeds, each measuring 215 square feet, the indoor/outdoor sculptural shelter can be used for sheltering public exhibitions, office meeting areas and even bike sheds. The intricate wooden structure is made from FSC Kebony wood that went through a patented process (Kebonization) that makes the wood harder, more durable and resistant, by using a non-toxic liquid derived from agricultural bio waste.

Structural engineers Ramboll UK worked alongside geometry consultants Evolute to develop the eye-catching structure and the interiors, made from white durable TensileFabric. Designed for the public, the KREOD pavilion will be at the Greenwich Peninsula Square until mid October and will be seen at high-profile locations across the city of London. Weatherproof LEDs inside the structure give the pavilion a fantastic glowing effect during the night and making it shine exposing its cells to the low-energy lights changing colors...


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Green Cast Facade by Kengo Kuma and Associates

Green Cast Facade by Kengo Kuma and Associates | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Kengo Kuma and Associates made this wonderful detailed green facade on mixed-use building in Odawara, Japan. The green building, built in 2011, has 5 floors with parking in the basement and ground floor. Other floors are occupied by the school, offices and residence with the rooftop terrace.

"The façade of the building is covered with planters made of aluminum die-cast panels, which provides space for facilities. The 3 (up to 6) aluminum panels, which also form planters, are made in monoblock casting. Each panel is slanted, and its surface appears to be organic, of which cast comes from decayed styrene foam. Equipment such as watering hose, air reservoir for ventilation and downpipes are installed behind the panels so that the façade can accommodate a comprehensive system for the building."


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