The Architecture of the City
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The Architecture of the City
a closer look at urbanism and architecture
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It’s Time to Start Building WOODEN Skyscrapers

It’s Time to Start Building WOODEN Skyscrapers | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it
'Plyscrapers,' created out of material similar to Ikea's wooden furniture, may be the future of high-rise buildings.

In 2023, Swedish architecture firm C.F. Møller will transform the Stockholm skyline—and perhaps the very notion of skyscrapers. Last December, the designers won a competition organized by HSB Stockholm to honor the local real estate titan’s upcoming centenary with an ostentatious new high-rise. Møller submitted three designs, but the public latched onto one in particular: a thirty-four story tower made almost entirely out of wood, save for a spindly concrete core and a few steel poles on the ground floor. If constructed, the tower will be the largest mostly-wooden structure in the world. But rather than a one-off, it could be the clarion call needed to rouse the public around a new architectural trend.


Via Lauren Moss, Anne Laure Jeannequin
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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, March 23, 2015 3:23 AM

I had already seen some images of this idea, but the more information we get about it, the more atractive it seems!

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Self-Sustaining “Farmscrapers” are Cities in Stackable Steel Rocks

Self-Sustaining “Farmscrapers” are Cities in Stackable Steel Rocks | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Smart cities, if they are ever to emerge, will likely center around redesign of urban buildings and infrastructure that will make them “self sustaining” and reduce carbon emissions and other “negative externalities.”

The Chinese city of Shenzen, a candidate for green transformation if there ever was one, and Asian Cairns will be a group of six “space age” looking buildings that will produce food for residents. The project will cover 79 acres (320,000 sq. m) with green vegetation incorporated into the structures of the building. Dubbed “farmscrapers” instead of “skyscrapers” the buildings will include housing, office space, shops and recreational areas.

Photovoltaic and photo thermal solar cells as well as wind turbines will be incorporated into the structure of the building to provide more energy than is consumed by residents. Callebaut designed the building so that no fossil fuels will be necessary, completely eliminating CO2 emissions.


Via Lauren Moss, massimo facchinetti
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, November 17, 2013 10:22 AM

This is worth looking over. These at least look more interesting than the typical sky scrapper.

umikael's curator insight, November 17, 2013 12:24 PM

it is not sci-fi

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Mexican architects squeeze a city into a skyscraper

Mexican architects squeeze a city into a skyscraper | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Studio Cachoua Torres Camilletti think their speculative proposal might suit a Hong Kong of the near future.


Via ECAL Library, arm3lle
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ARUP's Urban Skyscraper: A Design Proposal for the Year 2050

ARUP's Urban Skyscraper: A Design Proposal for the Year 2050 | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

In the article entitled “It’s Alive,” the design team at engineering firm ARUP envision a city building in the year 2050 that includes flexible modular pods, urban agriculture, climate-conscious facades and intelligent building systems. ARUP hopes the proposal will ultimately answer the question, "As city living takes center stage, what will we come to expect from the design and function of urban structures and buildings?".

 

ARUP’s futuristic skyscraper will be a “smart” building that will plug into a smart urban infrastructure, and cater to an expanding and technological society. By 2050, the global population will reach nine billion, 75% of which will live in cities. Significantly, this date will also mark a generation of adults that have lived their entire lives engaging with smart devices and materials. The design theory is that the population of 2050 is likely to be in constant flux, and therefore buildings and materials that surround this urban lifestyle must also be capable of evolution and change.

ARUP has imagined a building of the future that produces more than it consumes. Alongside the sustainable construction, the design will feature photovoltaic capability to capture and transmit energy using on-site fuel cells. In addition, energy will be harnessed from elevators or similar internal systems, along with wind turbines and algae-producing bio-fuel pods...


Via Lauren Moss
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Mercor's curator insight, February 14, 2013 7:01 AM

Scooped by Lauren Moss onto green infographics

Duane Craig's curator insight, February 20, 2013 11:54 AM

Whike true sustainabiity in buildings is probably not possible, this moves closer to it.