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The Architecture of the City
a closer look at urbanism and architecture
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The ever CHANGING story of London's skyline

The ever CHANGING story of London's skyline | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

More than 230 tall buildings of over 20 storeys are currently proposed, approved or under construction in London, according to an independent survey which also claims that 80% of the planned towers will be for residential use.


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Chun Qing Li's Sustainable Pavilion Unveiled at London Design Festival

Chun Qing Li's Sustainable Pavilion Unveiled at London Design Festival | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it
KREOD pavilion in Greenwich by local architect Chun Qing Li and featuring an intricate FSC Norwegian wood design opens up for London Design Festival 2012.

A new architectural landmark for East London was unveiled at this year's bustling London Design Festival. Located in a green-walled square at the Greenwich Peninsula, the KREOD pavilion consists of three interconnected pods made from Tensile fabric and an award-winning sustainable wood called Kebony. Inspired by nature and intricate in its design, this mobile, durable pavilion by Chun Qing Li, sets a new standard for sustainable thinking in the digital age.

Designed to resemble three giant seeds, each measuring 215 square feet, the indoor/outdoor sculptural shelter can be used for sheltering public exhibitions, office meeting areas and even bike sheds. The intricate wooden structure is made from FSC Kebony wood that went through a patented process (Kebonization) that makes the wood harder, more durable and resistant, by using a non-toxic liquid derived from agricultural bio waste.

Structural engineers Ramboll UK worked alongside geometry consultants Evolute to develop the eye-catching structure and the interiors, made from white durable TensileFabric. Designed for the public, the KREOD pavilion will be at the Greenwich Peninsula Square until mid October and will be seen at high-profile locations across the city of London. Weatherproof LEDs inside the structure give the pavilion a fantastic glowing effect during the night and making it shine exposing its cells to the low-energy lights changing colors...


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Crystal clear: the case for green building

Crystal clear: the case for green building | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Part office, part exhibition space, a new London landmark aims to challenge our assumptions about green design.

 

A new building in east London’s Royal Victoria Docks aims to change public perceptions of green architecture – while trialling some new sustainable technologies and approaches at scale. There’s not a green roof or thick insulated wall in sight. In fact, the structure, which is called the Crystal, is everything we’ve come to believe a sustainable building shouldn’t be: lightweight, angular, glazed from top to bottom and with a roof made out of steel.

Part office space, part interactive exhibition about the future of cities, the building is intended as a living experiment in sustainability that business leaders, politicians and the general public alike can learn from. “The building is a great demonstration of the ‘art of the possible’”, says Martin Hunt, Head of Networks and Partnerships at Forum for the Future. “It’s refreshing to see an interactive exhibition that visualises what our cities could be like – based on high quality research and thoughtful benchmarking. It brings the big issues of urban living – such as water and energy consumption, public health and safety – to life in a way that engages people and inspires them.”


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Duane Craig's curator insight, January 7, 2013 10:13 AM

It's quite enlightening, as pointed out here, that a lot of glass used correctly can actually yield a zero energy building. But I agree that assessing the true sustainability of the building would have to factor in all the embodied fossil fuel and other energy used to make its components. And when you're talking about glass, that could be huge.

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Sustainable Olympic stadium: a leader in the global green movement...

Sustainable Olympic stadium: a leader in the global green movement... | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

With its red running tracks surrounded by black and white seats and floodlights stretching above the roof, London’s elliptically shaped Olympic Stadium resembles many other sporting venues.

But the building’s principal designer, Philip Johnson, believes it will lead a global movement towards sustainable architecture.

Mostly lightweight steel was used in the construction, the roof is made of PVC and the stadium boasts a fabric curtain, designed to minimize crosswinds. Moreover, the water collected from the roof is used to flush the toilets, while the earth embankments that surround the stadium protect the biodiversity of the site by encouraging plants to grow.

“We want to use as little material as possible,” said Johnson, of the architectural consultancy, Populous, which is headquartered in the US city of Kansas, but has offices around the world, including one in the British capital...


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