The Architecture ...
Follow
Find tag "interview"
60.2K views | +17 today
The Architecture of the City
a closer look at urbanism and architecture
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by association concert urbain from green streets
Scoop.it!

INTERVIEW: Tweaking the Code, Greening the City

INTERVIEW: Tweaking the Code, Greening the City | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it
The second in a series of five interviews with staffers at the New York City Department of City Planning.

The interviewer interned while pursuing a master’s degree in urban planning. Read the first installment at americancity.org.

 

This past spring, the New York City Council adopted Zone Green, dozens of pages worth of tweaks to the city’s zoning code that make it easier for property owners and developers to work environmentally friendly features — from rooftop greenhouses to insulated walls — into new and existing buildings throughout the city. Here Monika Jain, project manager of the DCP-led effort and an urban designer with the department’s zoning division, talks about the ambitious overhaul that’s been two years in the making...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by association concert urbain from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Beyond the Greenwash | Bioclimatic Architecture

Beyond the Greenwash | Bioclimatic Architecture | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it
In the building industry, greenwashing is a constant challenge.

 

World-renowned architect Ken Yeang explains that bioclimatic architecture is a way to practice green building in a way that cuts through the greenwash, representing truly environmentally responsible, sustainable design.

In an interview with CNN, Yeang cites nature as his ‘biggest source of inspiration’ and notes that he has taken well-developed design principles from the natural world for more than 30 years. The concept of bioclimatic architecture encourages the intermingling of natural and built spaces, with the latter taking the former into the highest consideration.

Yeang states decisions made at the design stage can drastically cut carbon and eliminate future environmental issues.
“If 80% of the impact is caused by design, you can anticipate the impact at that stage and you can reduce the impact from 80% to the minimum.”
The architect cites finding a balance between the built and the natural as a key to mastering bioclimatic design. By balancing natural components with the artificial in a built development, a large-scale building can be offset by the number of plants and natural vegetation included throughout...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.