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Climate-responsive architecture: Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi

Climate-responsive architecture: Villa 921 by Harunatsu-Archi | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

Villa 921 is a single-story concrete house designed to protect residents from extreme climate conditions. Located in Japan, at a remote island accessible only by boat, this unique home was designed by Harunatsu-Archi. 

Architecturally, wood and glass walls slide open across the front and rear of the building, allowing the wind to move through the spaces for natural ventilation, while projecting canopies shade the rooms and terrace from the harsh sun. During typhoons, the house and terrace can be screened behind protective coverings, which fasten onto the protruding eaves...

 

More from the architects:

“The usable area of the house only amounts to about 70 square metres,” said architects Shoko Murakaji and Naoto Murakaji. “This is by no means large, but thanks to the amazing views of the landscape, there is never a feeling of narrowness.”


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by association concert urbain from Digital Sustainability
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Villa Asserbo: A Sustainable, PRINTED HOUSE That Snaps Together ...

Villa Asserbo: A Sustainable, PRINTED HOUSE That Snaps Together ... | The Architecture of the City | Scoop.it

We’ve covered 3D Printing a lot here at ArchDaily, but most of our coverage has been speculative and, frankly, futuristic – could we, one day, print out Gaudi-esque stone structures? Or even print a biologically-inspired, living house?

 

But today we heard a story about an alternative to 3D Printing‘s capabilities in the here and now - and its implications are pretty exciting.In a small town outside of Copenhagen, Danish architects Eentileen joined forces with London-based digital fabrication and architecture specialists, Facit Homes, to create Villa Asserbo: a 1,250 square foot, sustainable home made from Nordic plywood fabricated via CNC miller and easily “snapped” together.No heavy machinery, no cranes, no large labor force. Just a couple of guys, a few easily printed pieces, and six weeks.

The architects are looking to make the houses open to the public soon. If their easy, sustainable, well-designed model is the immediate future of alternative to 3D Printing (and considering it’s such a “snap,” it very well might be), then we’re all aboard...


Via Lauren Moss, Digital Sustainability
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Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, November 3, 2012 3:24 AM
we love this house! I am a fan of Facit ..we have pinned this in Pinterest ty :)