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Urbanisme
Avenir de l'urbanisme, conception des villes, initiatives et perspectives
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Reprogramming Existing City Infrastructure for #Sustainability | #smartcities

Reprogramming Existing City Infrastructure for #Sustainability | #smartcities | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

Across the world, innovative solutions to urban needs are emerging from new uses for existing structures and systems. Officials are joining hands with engineers and corporate R&D teams to improve access to essential resources like water, energy and sunlight, and increase social and environmental wellbeing by reimagining the potential of the resources they already have. They are reprogramming the city.


Via jean lievens, luiy
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luiy's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:08 AM

Take Lima. For those living on the edges of Peru’s capital, access to clean drinking water is a problem. Small wells supply most of the water, which one resident describes as “unpleasant and polluted,” and in the summer “there isn’t much available.”


Engineers at the local University of Engineering and Technology (UTEC) decided to tackle the issue by making innovative use of two of the city’s more abundant resources: its humid air (which can reach 98 percent humidity), and the billboards that reach into it. They installed a humidity collector and water purifier into the top of one advertising structure in the village of Bujama, creating the UTEC Water Billboard. It can produce 96 liters of clean drinking water a day for local residents, which flows down a pipe to a tap at the base of the structure. Resident Francisco Quilca says it has provided him and his neighbors with a new, pure water source, and wishes it could exist “on the door of every house, in every village.”

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Sprouting Eco-Cities: Sustainability Trend-Setters Or Gated Communities?

Sprouting Eco-Cities: Sustainability Trend-Setters Or Gated Communities? | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

Not only are many cities bursting at the seams from urban overcrowding; they are also increasingly starting to bear the strains of climate change.

Although there are numerous solutions to either challenge, the building up of new "eco-cities" tries to kill the two birds with one stone. But what is the role of these master-planned communities in our sustainable futures?

The concept of an isolated, ecologically minded community is by no means a new one. The forward-thinking Buckminster Fuller was talking about "domed communities" in the 1960s, and in 1975 writer Ernest Callenbach published his novel Ecotopia, greatly influencing the green movements that would quickly follow.

While smaller versions may have grown more organically, contemporary Eco-Cities are often top-down master plans designed by big-name firms. Since many of these Eco-Cities are still under development, we can only speculate about their future performance and whether they will be flexible enough to function as a "real city."


Visit the link to read the complete article.


Via Lauren Moss
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Norm Miller's curator insight, August 12, 2013 1:43 PM

This article raises a good question.  It makes more sense to retrofit existing buildings so why not existing cities?

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A Sustainable, Innovative Proposal for Taichung City Cultural Centre in Taiwan

A Sustainable, Innovative Proposal for Taichung City Cultural Centre in Taiwan | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

The team of architects from Maxthreads Architectural Design & Planning designed the Taichung City Cultural Centre with the aim of combining nature and innovative technology.


The project defines the northern arrival gateway to Taichung Gateway Park, providing a public hub to the overall master plan. An iconic visual corridor connects the Transportation Centre to the main cultural district of the city through a vibrant pubic space, creating an unconventional and exceptional gathering space for visitors and inhabitants.

Maxthreads’ proposal introduces a strong relationship between the exterior and interior public spaces integrating into the Taichung Gateway Park. The Cultural Centre is designed in conjunction with Taichung Gateway park, and includes the integration of culture, education, tourism, environmental conservation, carbon reduction, energy conservation and sustainability.


Via Lauren Moss
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Sustainable Architecture: The International Style of the 21st Century

Sustainable Architecture: The International Style of the 21st Century | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

For more than a century what we know of as Modern Architecture has spread and flourished in every corner of the globe. Though the term International Style was not popularized until the 1930s architects the world over had been discovering the ways in which modern technologies and materials made possible by the industrial age could be put to use in the art of building since well before the turn of the last century. Starting with such great architects as Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan, Philip Johnson, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, the Modern movement in architecture was, and is still, an expression of man’s conquest over his environment; his ability to place the exact same building in any city on any continent anywhere in the world and have it function, look, and feel the exact same. It was the homogenization of architecture, and it was a great fault in human history.


Via Lauren Moss
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Mark Warren's curator insight, December 16, 2012 10:28 AM
Sustainable Architecture: The International Style of the 21st Century
Jemma Tanner's curator insight, October 28, 2013 11:32 PM

This article gave me an idea for a design task activity consisting of making your own sustainable building. If I were to ever create this activity I'd probably find an old building in the city that was going to be knocked down and create a story that the students had to design the replacement. I'd give criteria based around sustainable practices as well as what functions the building must have. The main focus I'd give them would be that the building needs to meet the needs of the residents without compromising future generations. From this resource I would take the three Ps mention - Purpose (does it fulfill the purpose for which it was designed), Physical (does it achieve the physical requirements given) and Pleasing (does it look good). If I really wanted to extend this task I could create a budget for the building in which the students would have to manage during its creation. I'd definitely do this as a group task because collaboration between students always generates more ideas.

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Benchmarking the Walkability of Global Cities

Benchmarking the Walkability of Global Cities | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

The world is becoming increasingly urban: by 2010 more than half the worlds population was living in an urban area and by 2050 that figure may rise to 70%. As these mega-cities become increasingly dense and over-populated, the transport systems that support them are struggling to cope. Cities around the world are realizing they will have to become walkable and bikeable in order to function in the future.

One global organisation is working to connect and empower governments, citizens and communities to achieve a walkable future. Walk21 is a non-profit with the vision to “create a world where people choose and are able to walk as a way to travel, to be healthy and to relax” and champions the International Charter for Walking, which prioritizes the following characteristics:

  • Inclusive Mobility
  • Integrated Networks
  • Less Crime
  • Promotion of Walking
  • Spaces for people
  • Spatial Planning
  • Supported Authorities
  • Reducing Road Danger

Find more information and links at the article...

Via Lauren Moss
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Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | #smartcities

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | #smartcities | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

 In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)


Via Lauren Moss, luiy
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luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 5:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.

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Agora Tower, Taipei: A Twisting Skyscraper Wrapped With Vertical Gardens

Agora Tower, Taipei: A Twisting Skyscraper Wrapped With Vertical Gardens | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

Taipei just broke ground on a twisting skyscraper that is wrapped with a jungle of vertical gardens...

Designed by Vincent Callebaut Architecture, the 455,000-square-foot Agora Tower will have an orchard, a vegetable garden, space for aromatic and medicinal plants, and a compost and rainwater capture system.

Designed to mimic two encircling hands and the helical structure of DNA, the towers are organized a central core that allows for a “hyper-abundance of suspended gardens.” These will spill over with edible and decorative plants, enabling residents of 40 luxury apartments to harvest a great deal of their own food (except for protein.) Plus, the rainwater capture system alleviates pressure on the municipal water supply and gives the complex even greater independence.

Each 540 square meter apartment will have an interior green wall as well, ensuring optimum air quality and a great green aesthetics. A circular light funnel will push daylighting right down to the basement of the building, a solar roof will provide energy, and low E glass will mitigate excess solar gain and prevent thermal loss.

Complete with nanotechnology and a host of other high-tech features, this one-of-a-kind tower may well be the greenest of its kind when it is completed circa 2016....


Via Lauren Moss
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Florence @ddline2020 's curator insight, March 10, 2013 5:20 AM

Designed by Vincent Callebaut Architecture, the 455,000-square-foot Agora Tower will have an orchard, a vegetable garden, space for aromatic and medicinal plants, and a compost and rainwater capture system.

Pagina Uno's curator insight, March 10, 2013 6:10 AM

Progettato per imitare la struttura elicoidale del DNA, le torri sono organizzate intorno ad un nucleo centrale che ha permesso la realizzare un "iper-abbondanza di giardini sospesi." Questi traboccano di piante commestibili e decorative, che consentono ai residenti dei 40 appartamenti di lusso di raccogliere una grande quantità di cibo. Inoltre, un sistema di raccolta delle acque piovane allevia il peso sulla rete idrica comunale e dà indipendenza al complesso.

Bubba Muntzer's comment, March 10, 2013 1:30 PM
This is a real fad now, skyscrapers that twist toward the sky like that, isn't it? I can't help but wonder about the legacy. Are we entering a new era where the species is losing its self consciousness, or have these architects simply not heard the old limerick about the heartbreak when the man who was threaded one way fell in love with the woman who was threaded the other way?