Urbanisme
Follow
Find tag "future"
54.8K views | +23 today
Urbanisme
Avenir de l'urbanisme, conception des villes, initiatives et perspectives
Curated by Lockall
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lockall from green streets
Scoop.it!

What if we could rebuild New York City?

What if we could rebuild New York City? | Urbanisme | Scoop.it
New York has become one of the world’s most populous, densely packed cities. What if you could redraw the city’s map – and build it from scratch?


If we were designing New York today, how different would it look?

The new New York City would balance the relationship between the information networks that the metropolis depends on and Earth’s finite resources.

All vital components of life would be monitored and attuned to the needs of every organism, not just humans. Supplies of food and water, our energy and waste and even our air would be sensibly scrutinised. Thanks to masses of miniaturised low-cost electronic components deployed across the city, communication becomes far easier. New York will grow and adapt to millions of new minds entering it everyday.

The city would make sure every need is provided for within its borders. How we provide nutrients, transports, and shelter would be updated. Dilapidated buildings would be replaced with vertical agriculture and new kinds of housing would join cleaner, greener ways to get around the city. What were once streets become snaking arteries of livable spaces, embedded with renewable energy sources, low-tech, green vehicles for mobility and productive nutrient zones. The former street grid could provide the foundation for new flexible networks. By reengineering the obsolete streets, we can create robust and ecologically active pathways.

While all this may sound optimistic, some of this city of tomorrow is already taking shape...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Norm Miller's curator insight, Today, 2:36 PM

What a great academic exercise!  The question is really applicable to all new cities and city undergoing renovation.  More mixed use, greener, better transport systems, more shared everything and more self-sufficient describe the plan.

Rescooped by Lockall from The urban.NET
Scoop.it!

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | #smartcities

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | #smartcities | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

 In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)


Via Lauren Moss, luiy
more...
luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 5:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.

Rescooped by Lockall from sustainable architecture
Scoop.it!

Sustainable Architecture: The International Style of the 21st Century

Sustainable Architecture: The International Style of the 21st Century | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

For more than a century what we know of as Modern Architecture has spread and flourished in every corner of the globe. Though the term International Style was not popularized until the 1930s architects the world over had been discovering the ways in which modern technologies and materials made possible by the industrial age could be put to use in the art of building since well before the turn of the last century. Starting with such great architects as Frank Lloyd Wright, Louis Sullivan, Philip Johnson, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, the Modern movement in architecture was, and is still, an expression of man’s conquest over his environment; his ability to place the exact same building in any city on any continent anywhere in the world and have it function, look, and feel the exact same. It was the homogenization of architecture, and it was a great fault in human history.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Mark Warren's curator insight, December 16, 2012 10:28 AM
Sustainable Architecture: The International Style of the 21st Century
Jemma Tanner's curator insight, October 28, 2013 11:32 PM

This article gave me an idea for a design task activity consisting of making your own sustainable building. If I were to ever create this activity I'd probably find an old building in the city that was going to be knocked down and create a story that the students had to design the replacement. I'd give criteria based around sustainable practices as well as what functions the building must have. The main focus I'd give them would be that the building needs to meet the needs of the residents without compromising future generations. From this resource I would take the three Ps mention - Purpose (does it fulfill the purpose for which it was designed), Physical (does it achieve the physical requirements given) and Pleasing (does it look good). If I really wanted to extend this task I could create a budget for the building in which the students would have to manage during its creation. I'd definitely do this as a group task because collaboration between students always generates more ideas.

Rescooped by Lockall from green infographics
Scoop.it!

The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic

The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered where you or your children may be living in 2050?
Experts predict that by then three-quarters of the world's population will live in cities. For part of its 
Tomorrow's Cities season the BBC takes a look through the crystal ball to imagine what city life might be like in 40 years' time.

Find more details at the interactive graphic at the link.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, August 23, 2013 4:15 PM

Here's some ideas on how we might live in the future. What do you think?

Rescooped by Lockall from URBANmedias
Scoop.it!

Is China's lakeside city the future of urban planning?

Is China's lakeside city the future of urban planning? | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

China's next new city will be designed by US firm KPF, next to Hunan's regional capital, around a 40-hectare lake.

 

Adjacent to Changsha, the ancient capital city of Hunan, the design implements the sort of urban innovation that creates a sustainable and truly habitable environment.

"We can introduce integrated urban innovation," von Klemperer says, "we can combine water transport with localised energy production, cluster neighbourhood centres, advanced flood prevention and water management, and urban agriculture. Meixi is an experiment in future city planning and building. It will serve Changsha as a new CBD, but it will also serve as a paradigm for other Chinese city planners. It's a kind of live test case."

 

The firm seeks to achieve these goals through its dense, mixed-use urban, plan, with integration with surrounding mountains, lakes, parks and canals. Meixi Lake will eventually be home to 180,000 inhabitants, living in "villages" of 10,000 people, clustered around the canals...

 


Via Lauren Moss, association concert urbain
more...
Rescooped by Lockall from Science News
Scoop.it!

The way we'll live next

The way we'll live next | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

With cities running out of room, the world’s ever-expanding population may soon need to find new homes. But where? Sea, sky, or desert? We look at the alternatives

 

Waterworlds: Seasteading

Artificial oasis: The Eco-City

'Cities in the sky’: Superskyscrapers


Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.