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Urbanisme
Avenir de l'urbanisme, conception des villes, initiatives et perspectives
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Five Cities Show the Future of Walkability

Five Cities Show the Future of Walkability | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

To walk in our cities is more than just a simple act of transport. Walking represents an appropriation of urban space for daily life. It means being an active part of the urban environment by learning, understanding and shaping the city on a personal level. Walking is one of the most democratic and equitable ways of getting around, but it’s also one of the ways most linked to factors outside an individual’s control, like social or physical abilities and the presence of infrastructure to walk comfortably and safely.

These are the factors that define walkability, which refers to how safe, convenient, and efficient it is to walk in an urban environment. Walkability has a direct impact on urban residents’ mobility, as the term is often used to communicate how likely the average person is to choose walking over other modes of transport in a given area...


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Zaiter Ramzy's curator insight, April 23, 5:47 AM

Bien vu les vertus de la marche à pied urbaine pour l'appropriation du territoire par ses habitants, quelques exemples de Helsinky à Hambourg

Catherine Bossis's curator insight, April 30, 5:59 AM

Je ne suis pas Bordelaise, ni au fan club du Maire de Bordeaux, je me déplace beaucoup en France. Ce week-end j'ai marché à Bordeaux et deux choses m'ont sauté aux yeux : 1- il y a des bancs (propres et agréables) partout en centre ville. On peut se reposer très facilement, ce qui facilite grandement la marche surtout des personnes à mobilité réduite (comme mes ados un peu paresseux !). 2- j'ai vu des enfants faire du vélo, ce que je ne vois pas à Toulouse par exemple où cela reste très dangereux de circuler en vélo (ce que je pratique chaque jour).  Dans d'autres collectivités Françaises j'observe un retour en arrière sur la piétonisation et la cyclabilité et c'est bien triste.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 26, 11:58 PM

Walkability enhances social connectedness and community identity - therefore perceptions of liveability

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7 Big Ways Cities Have Transformed Themselves For Bikes

7 Big Ways Cities Have Transformed Themselves For Bikes | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

The number of bikes in our cities is increasing, and with that increase we’re also seeing some major changes in the way cities are designed. Engineers are giving bikes their own bridges, tunnels, overpasses, even escalators, making biking feel like it’s an essential, permanent part of the city.

Last week, Copenhagen announced an elevated cycleway for the Øresund Bridge, an existing bridge which connects the city to Malmö, Sweden. The second longest bridge in Europe, and at about eight miles long, will likely be the longest dedicated bike bridge in the world. That’s a serious commitment to the cyclists in the region, but also to the health and well-being for all residents. Customised bike infrastructure is more comfortable, convenient, and safe for those who choose to travel on two wheels, but it’s also safer for pedestrians as well. As the biking movement gains momentum, we’ll be seeing cities devoting more space and energy towards these awesome bike-only improvements that make streets safer for everyone...



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Catherine Devin's curator insight, August 4, 2014 2:48 AM

La nouvelle impulsion donnée à l'utilisation de la bicyclette à des fins de déplacement comme de loisir en lien avec l'essor des pistes cyclables dans les villes et à l'orée de celles-ci représente un exemple réussi et concret de notre capacité à évoluer vers un mode de vie plus durable dans certains lieux... Et nous n'en sommes qu'à l'amorce.

 

Ce mouvement repose sur beaucoup plus qu'une injonction à la moindre consommation de carburant/ émission de CO2 ou même la contrainte de coût ou à l'inverse une impulsion citoyenne. Il relève plutôt d'un travail de marketing fondamental par rapport à un objectif d'accroître l'utilisation de la bicyclette en ville.

Il a fallu comprendre les citadins :  identifier les leviers pour les engager à prendre un vélo (vitesse et liberté de déplacement,  activité physique, plaisir...) ainsi que lever les freins à l'utilisation (sécurité, accès à un vélo, parking vélo...) et au final,  mettre en place toutes les conditions de ce retour au vélo : parcs de bicyclettes à louer, voies cyclables...  associée à une stratégie et des outils de communication multiples et permanents.

Julie Wicks's curator insight, August 28, 2014 1:06 AM

Place and Liveability Geography Year 7. 'The strategies used to enhance the liveability of places, especially for young people, including examples from Australia and Europe(ACHGK047)'

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Which Cities Are the Greenest?

Which Cities Are the Greenest? | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

Was your city ranked as one of the greenest in the United States and Canada?

Around the world, cities are embracing this challenge with strategies from implementing bike shares and aiming for zero waste to creating buildings that generate their own energy. Last year, the international group C40 Cities, a network of the world’s largest cities working to address climate change, partnered with Siemens for the first city climate leadership awards, which recognized 10 cities for green achievement in 10 different categories.

The leadership awards are open to the C40 cities and the cities mentioned in Siemens Green City Index, which ranks cities globally on their efforts to go green and identifies challenges particular to different areas of the world.

More information and details at the link.


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The Amazing Things You Can Learn From a Virtual City

The Amazing Things You Can Learn From a Virtual City | Urbanisme | Scoop.it
This new tool can help us understand how people respond to urban spaces before they're built.

When the University of Waterloo in Ontario opened the Research Laboratory for Immersive Virtual Environments in 2006, there was a lot that could be studied about simulated cities that couldn't be observed in real ones.

Technology has since made it easier to make such measurements in people moving through actual cities, but the virtual lab still offers them a critical advantage: control over all the variables in a complex urban environment. The psychologists at RELIVE wield that power to understand just how people respond to cities — which in turn might help planners design better ones.

"Rather than looking at what happens to people in urban settings after they're built, you can propose different kinds of designs and explore their effects on people's behavior before they happen," says lab director Colin Ellard. "We see it as potentially a fantastic toolkit for asking questions about what does or doesn't work in planning."


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The Neighborhood Data Portal Every City Needs

The Neighborhood Data Portal Every City Needs | Urbanisme | Scoop.it
Los Angeles rolls out interactive neighborhood health profiles covering everything from crime stats to obesity rates.

As the open data movement has matured, public city-wide vital stats have come to feel more like a citizen's right than a civic innovation. This is where things should head next: Take all of that data, map it, connect the dots between public health, land use, economics, education, crime and housing. And portray those patterns – and the inequality they often reveal – down to the neighborhood level.


Los Angeles has recently done just this, rolling out a web tool as part of its Plan for a Healthy Los Angeles that maps a tremendous number of metrics about life in the region, at both the city and neighborhood scales. Just a sampling of the dozens of metrics, via the portal from the L.A. Department of City Planning, the L.A. County Department of Public Health and The California Endowment:


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Reprogramming Existing City Infrastructure for #Sustainability | #smartcities

Reprogramming Existing City Infrastructure for #Sustainability | #smartcities | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

Across the world, innovative solutions to urban needs are emerging from new uses for existing structures and systems. Officials are joining hands with engineers and corporate R&D teams to improve access to essential resources like water, energy and sunlight, and increase social and environmental wellbeing by reimagining the potential of the resources they already have. They are reprogramming the city.


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luiy's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:08 AM

Take Lima. For those living on the edges of Peru’s capital, access to clean drinking water is a problem. Small wells supply most of the water, which one resident describes as “unpleasant and polluted,” and in the summer “there isn’t much available.”


Engineers at the local University of Engineering and Technology (UTEC) decided to tackle the issue by making innovative use of two of the city’s more abundant resources: its humid air (which can reach 98 percent humidity), and the billboards that reach into it. They installed a humidity collector and water purifier into the top of one advertising structure in the village of Bujama, creating the UTEC Water Billboard. It can produce 96 liters of clean drinking water a day for local residents, which flows down a pipe to a tap at the base of the structure. Resident Francisco Quilca says it has provided him and his neighbors with a new, pure water source, and wishes it could exist “on the door of every house, in every village.”

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Urban Characters: Exploring the places and objects that make each city unique

Urban Characters: Exploring the places and objects that make each city unique | Urbanisme | Scoop.it
A salute to those special places—some humble, some utterly utilitarian—that give a city its unique personality and collective soul.


The six places and objects shown at the link are urban amenities of a particular kind, but really they’re much more than that. These are the distinct features in the landscape that give a city its unique character. Every city has them. They can be supremely useful (the parkettes in Toronto, Pike Place Market in Seattle, Washington, D.C.’s fabulous subway stations) or gloriously idiosyncratic (the hidden staircases in Los Angeles, Pittsburgh’s charming Inclines, the incongruous gas lamps of sunny San Diego).

All of them, however, play a beloved civic role that transcends their mere function, lending a kind of quiet poetry to daily life, grace notes to the grind. Six writers and designers, one from each city, reflect on these special characters in the urban landscape...


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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, September 26, 2013 2:54 PM

This thought from the article sums it up for me...."believe that we can be great and that change is possible and that we can achieve it."

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Benchmarking the Walkability of Global Cities

Benchmarking the Walkability of Global Cities | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

The world is becoming increasingly urban: by 2010 more than half the worlds population was living in an urban area and by 2050 that figure may rise to 70%. As these mega-cities become increasingly dense and over-populated, the transport systems that support them are struggling to cope. Cities around the world are realizing they will have to become walkable and bikeable in order to function in the future.

One global organisation is working to connect and empower governments, citizens and communities to achieve a walkable future. Walk21 is a non-profit with the vision to “create a world where people choose and are able to walk as a way to travel, to be healthy and to relax” and champions the International Charter for Walking, which prioritizes the following characteristics:

  • Inclusive Mobility
  • Integrated Networks
  • Less Crime
  • Promotion of Walking
  • Spaces for people
  • Spatial Planning
  • Supported Authorities
  • Reducing Road Danger

Find more information and links at the article...

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Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | #smartcities

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | #smartcities | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

 In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)


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luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 5:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.

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Is China's lakeside city the future of urban planning?

Is China's lakeside city the future of urban planning? | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

China's next new city will be designed by US firm KPF, next to Hunan's regional capital, around a 40-hectare lake.

 

Adjacent to Changsha, the ancient capital city of Hunan, the design implements the sort of urban innovation that creates a sustainable and truly habitable environment.

"We can introduce integrated urban innovation," von Klemperer says, "we can combine water transport with localised energy production, cluster neighbourhood centres, advanced flood prevention and water management, and urban agriculture. Meixi is an experiment in future city planning and building. It will serve Changsha as a new CBD, but it will also serve as a paradigm for other Chinese city planners. It's a kind of live test case."

 

The firm seeks to achieve these goals through its dense, mixed-use urban, plan, with integration with surrounding mountains, lakes, parks and canals. Meixi Lake will eventually be home to 180,000 inhabitants, living in "villages" of 10,000 people, clustered around the canals...

 


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The V-Pole's futuristic street solution for all our tech needs

The V-Pole's futuristic street solution for all our tech needs | Urbanisme | Scoop.it
The V-Pole is not only capable of providing wi-fi and boosting cellphone coverage, it would also provide a charger for electric cars. An LED light covers the illumination aspect, plus it would also incorporate an electronic system to handle parking transactions and even act as a public message board.

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Five cities awarded UNESCO City of Design status

Five cities awarded UNESCO City of Design status | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

Dundee, Bilbao, Curitiba, Helsinki and Turin have been awarded UNESCO City of Design status for their input to the international design industry.


The accolade, awarded by international heritage body UNESCO, recognises the contribution of the five cities to the worldwide design industry – each the first in their respective countries of the UK, Spain, Brazil, Finland and Italy to achieve the designation. The scheme aims to promote the development of local creative industries, and to foster relationships and resource-sharing between fellow Cities of Design.


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The City We Want | Archi-Ninja

The City We Want | Archi-Ninja | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

One could argue that humanity has come to a critical point when looking at our current and future way of habitation.  Industrial civilization is moving towards the destruction of our planet, there is overwhelming evidence of this everywhere. We live without ration and we take our current condition for granted as if it were normal and somehow “part of human nature”, whereas in reality, it is the opposite.

There are lots of people who are working to make a difference, these people do not conform to the given social relationships that perpetuate inequality, injustice, scarcity and violence. For as long as there has been oppression there has been resistance and there are many of ways (theoretical and practical, or even both) in which we can all contribute to the struggle against our current self-destructive way of living...


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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, July 31, 2014 2:52 PM

Analyse critique du monde des villes (en anglais)

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What if we could rebuild New York City?

What if we could rebuild New York City? | Urbanisme | Scoop.it
New York has become one of the world’s most populous, densely packed cities. What if you could redraw the city’s map – and build it from scratch?


If we were designing New York today, how different would it look?

The new New York City would balance the relationship between the information networks that the metropolis depends on and Earth’s finite resources.

All vital components of life would be monitored and attuned to the needs of every organism, not just humans. Supplies of food and water, our energy and waste and even our air would be sensibly scrutinised. Thanks to masses of miniaturised low-cost electronic components deployed across the city, communication becomes far easier. New York will grow and adapt to millions of new minds entering it everyday.

The city would make sure every need is provided for within its borders. How we provide nutrients, transports, and shelter would be updated. Dilapidated buildings would be replaced with vertical agriculture and new kinds of housing would join cleaner, greener ways to get around the city. What were once streets become snaking arteries of livable spaces, embedded with renewable energy sources, low-tech, green vehicles for mobility and productive nutrient zones. The former street grid could provide the foundation for new flexible networks. By reengineering the obsolete streets, we can create robust and ecologically active pathways.

While all this may sound optimistic, some of this city of tomorrow is already taking shape...


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Norm Miller's curator insight, April 18, 2014 2:36 PM

What a great academic exercise!  The question is really applicable to all new cities and city undergoing renovation.  More mixed use, greener, better transport systems, more shared everything and more self-sufficient describe the plan.

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Norman Foster-Designed Scheme Aims to Transform London into “Cycling Utopia”

Norman Foster-Designed Scheme Aims to Transform London into “Cycling Utopia” | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

Foster + Partners has unveiled a scheme that aims to transform London’s railways into cycling freeways. The plausible proposal, which was designed with the help of landscape firm Exterior Architecture and transportation consultant Space Syntax, would connect more than six million residents to an elevated network of car-free bicycle paths built above London’s existing railway lines if approved.

“SkyCycle is a lateral approach to finding space in a congested city,” said Norman Foster, who is both a regular cyclist and the president of Britain’s National Byway Trust. ”By using the corridors above the suburban railways, we could create a world-class network of safe, car free cycle routes that are ideally located for commuters.”




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Norm Miller's curator insight, January 3, 2014 1:23 PM

Bikers in London better have some good rain gear. :-)

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How To Improve A City: 10 Feats Of Engineering From Arup

How To Improve A City: 10 Feats Of Engineering From Arup | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

Last week, Architizer and Arup put out a call for ideas to make New York City a better place for its residents and the 1 million additional people projected to arrive in the next few decades. As a follow-up, we’ve gathered a few examples of Arup projects from around the world that demonstrate the way that design can enhance everyday life in urban areas.

One, the UK's high-speed rail line from London to the Channel Tunnel, was a massive, decades-long effort that had the regeneration of a whole city sector in its goals from the outset. Others, such as a water recycling facility in a Melbourne park, are more modest in scale and scope, but present interesting models for dealing with challenges common to many cities around the world: resource constraints, housing shortages, disadvantaged neighborhoods, natural disasters, and more.


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The Closest Look Yet at the Relative Energy Efficiency of Big Buildings

The Closest Look Yet at the Relative Energy Efficiency of Big Buildings | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

New York City's largest buildings have as outsized a place in the city's energy use profile as they do in the skyline. Just 2% of New York's properties account for 48% of the city's energy use. 

What's a city to do? The Bloomberg administration is doing what it does best: crunching massive amounts of data. On Wednesday, the mayor released the city's second annual benchmarking report, which analyzes the year-to-year energy and water use of New York's 26,680 largest buildings. 

"It's the first time we've had access to this comparative information," says Melissa Wright, an associate director of the Natural Resources Defense Council’s City Energy Project who has worked in the Bloomberg administration. "For so long it was this hidden information about what the real energy performance was of a set of buildings or individual buildings."

Visit the link for more...


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The Urban Landscape: Designing With Cities, Not For Them

The Urban Landscape: Designing With Cities, Not For Them | Urbanisme | Scoop.it
When the city is viewed not as a destination for design but as the source material for it, a new relationship between design and the urban landscape is possible.

Whether it’s repurposing a billboard to act as a humidity collection system for clean drinking water in Lima, Peru, or integrating Wi-Fi capabilities into Madrid’s paving stones with the iPavement initiative, cities are increasingly expanding the capabilities of their existing assets and reforming the urban terrain as a landscape of opportunity.


The truth is that a city has all the resources it needs; the key to unlocking these resources is seeing the urban landscape not as the end result of a previous creative process, but as the beginning of a new onea landscape to design with, not for.


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The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic

The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered where you or your children may be living in 2050?
Experts predict that by then three-quarters of the world's population will live in cities. For part of its 
Tomorrow's Cities season the BBC takes a look through the crystal ball to imagine what city life might be like in 40 years' time.

Find more details at the interactive graphic at the link.


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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, August 23, 2013 4:15 PM

Here's some ideas on how we might live in the future. What do you think?

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9 Steps Cities Must Take to Dramatically Cut Carbon Emissions

9 Steps Cities Must Take to Dramatically Cut Carbon Emissions | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

A very long, very bold to-do list for the next 20 years.

The city of Toronto has already begun to sketch out policies that could reduce the area’s greenhouse gas emissions in the coming decades. Officials have proposed greening the electric grid, banning incandescent light bulbs, promoting green roofs on commercial buildings, retrofitting 1960s-era high-rises and implementing a stricter energy-efficient building code for new construction. With transportation, the city wants to expand bike lanes and transit infrastructure, all while it anticipates that electric vehicles will grow slowly more common.

This is a pretty standard menu of ideas, and according to scientists it will get the city part of the way toward the kind of changes broadly needed to really keep global temperature rise below 2 degrees Celsius.

But to really alter the future prospects for climate change, much more will have to happen in Toronto, and every other city. Researchers used the city as a case study to model what a truly aggressive framework might look like. If Toronto wants to cut emissions by 70 percent by 2031, all of these actions (or others with a similar impact) might be required in tandem...


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Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, February 13, 2013 6:13 PM

While the steps being proposed in Toronto may not be as aggressive as those recommending by researchers concerned with reversing the climate changes caused by humanity's activity, they are at least a step in the right direction and far more than what seems likely in most U.S. cities.

 

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Smart Cities and the Smart Grid

Smart Cities and the Smart Grid | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

Smart Cities and the Smart Grid: There are natural parallels between the Smart Grid and smart cities in terms of concepts and deployments, though cities have much more experience at evolution than the traditional electrical grid. After all, they have been adopting new technologies that disrupt the status quo for centuries. The Romans created aqueducts and fundamentally changed how water could be controlled and distributed in cities. Discoveries in hygiene and disease transmission and control allowed people to healthily live in population densities with minimized odds of large scale epidemics. And then automobiles exerted their influences on cities. In each case, city systems, policies, and people changed to accommodate new technologies, new knowledge and new practices.

 

Now, ambitious goals such as zero net energy buildings will change the relationships that physical structures have within cities, and in turn change the relationships that occupants (full or part-time) have within buildings and within cities.

 

Read the complete article for more on the latest advances in the building industry, infrastructure and transportation, and how smart cities will interact with the Smart Grid...


Via Joan Tarruell, Stephane Bilodeau, Lauren Moss, association concert urbain, Grd Lyon Métropole-M3
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Seren's curator insight, August 26, 2013 5:09 PM

An article drawig parallels between ancient city grids and their evolution into the modern age.

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Can cities desegregate?

Can cities desegregate? | Urbanisme | Scoop.it
Urban centers have been racially divided since Mesopotamia -- but radical, global new measures aim to change that

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