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Avenir de l'urbanisme, conception des villes, initiatives et perspectives
Curated by Lockall
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Rescooped by Lockall from green streets

Five Cities Show the Future of Walkability

Five Cities Show the Future of Walkability | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

To walk in our cities is more than just a simple act of transport. Walking represents an appropriation of urban space for daily life. It means being an active part of the urban environment by learning, understanding and shaping the city on a personal level. Walking is one of the most democratic and equitable ways of getting around, but it’s also one of the ways most linked to factors outside an individual’s control, like social or physical abilities and the presence of infrastructure to walk comfortably and safely.

These are the factors that define walkability, which refers to how safe, convenient, and efficient it is to walk in an urban environment. Walkability has a direct impact on urban residents’ mobility, as the term is often used to communicate how likely the average person is to choose walking over other modes of transport in a given area...

Via Lauren Moss
Zaiter Ramzy's curator insight, April 23, 5:47 AM

Bien vu les vertus de la marche à pied urbaine pour l'appropriation du territoire par ses habitants, quelques exemples de Helsinky à Hambourg

Catherine Bossis's curator insight, April 30, 5:59 AM

Je ne suis pas Bordelaise, ni au fan club du Maire de Bordeaux, je me déplace beaucoup en France. Ce week-end j'ai marché à Bordeaux et deux choses m'ont sauté aux yeux : 1- il y a des bancs (propres et agréables) partout en centre ville. On peut se reposer très facilement, ce qui facilite grandement la marche surtout des personnes à mobilité réduite (comme mes ados un peu paresseux !). 2- j'ai vu des enfants faire du vélo, ce que je ne vois pas à Toulouse par exemple où cela reste très dangereux de circuler en vélo (ce que je pratique chaque jour).  Dans d'autres collectivités Françaises j'observe un retour en arrière sur la piétonisation et la cyclabilité et c'est bien triste.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 26, 11:58 PM

Walkability enhances social connectedness and community identity - therefore perceptions of liveability

Rescooped by Lockall from green streets

Expansive Eco-Architecture Complex Planned for New Orleans

Expansive Eco-Architecture Complex Planned for New Orleans | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

Three ambitious architectural firms have set out on a task to re-develop New Orleans with a 30-million-square-foot triangular architectural complex on the Mississippi riverfront. Dubbed NOAH, or New Orleans Archology Habitat, the hurricane-proof complex will carry 20,000 residential units, three hotels, 1 million square feet of commercial space and enough space for cultural facilities and offices.

The complex will feature green systems, including solar panels, wind turbines, water turbines, fresh water recovery systems and a passive solar glazing system. While still in the planning phases, the project is an example of how architecture should be capable of generating enough power to fuel more than it consumes. 

Via Lauren Moss
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 10, 2013 4:55 PM

Eco developments making cities sustainable

Rescooped by Lockall from green streets

Smart Cities + Green Megaprojects of the Future

Smart Cities + Green Megaprojects of the Future | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

For many years, architects and city planners from around the world have been trying to create the green ideal: an entire city built to strict environmental standards- highly functional while still retaining aesthetic value.

Here’s a look at some green building and community design that caught our attention in recent months and may (or may not) become reality in the next several years. Their physical footprints may be large, but by using features such as wind power, solar, rainwater recycling and advanced air quality controls, their carbon footprints don't have to be...

Via Lauren Moss
Mercor's curator insight, January 2, 2013 6:33 AM

Rescooped by Digital Sustainability from green streets onto Digital Sustainability

Norm Miller's curator insight, January 2, 2013 4:32 PM

This is going beyond Mazdar in Dubai.  The reality is that we need to transform existing cities since starting from scratch is rare.  We need to retrofit cities more than build new ones, but still it is interesting.

Alexandre Pépin's curator insight, March 4, 2013 6:31 AM


Rescooped by Lockall from Nuevas Geografías

The Density Atlas

The Density Atlas | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

The Density Atlas is a planning, design and development resource for comparing urban densities around the world. The Atlas features a unique metrics and scale system for a comprehensive understanding of urban density.

Via Ignacio López Busón, José Moraga Campos
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Rescooped by Lockall from The urban.NET

My City – Crowdsourced #urban planning platform | #Participatory #democracy

My City – Crowdsourced #urban planning platform | #Participatory #democracy | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

Via luiy
luiy's curator insight, June 4, 2014 6:04 AM

Collect ideas on improving your city


My City is a platform for sharing and discussing ideas on what can be improved in the city and how to make it happen.



Inspire people to take action


The platform lets users update the status of proposals, helping them feel engaged in the whole process of implementation.

bart rosseau's curator insight, June 5, 2014 3:19 AM

a fine example of crowdsource platforms...

Rescooped by Lockall from Urban Life

Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands as one of the world's poorest mega-cities. This report comes from a GlobalPost series about the rise of mega-cities.

Via Seth Dixon, geofoodgraz, association concert urbain, Jandira Feijó
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:44 PM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Rescooped by Lockall from URBANmedias

Is China's lakeside city the future of urban planning?

Is China's lakeside city the future of urban planning? | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

China's next new city will be designed by US firm KPF, next to Hunan's regional capital, around a 40-hectare lake.


Adjacent to Changsha, the ancient capital city of Hunan, the design implements the sort of urban innovation that creates a sustainable and truly habitable environment.

"We can introduce integrated urban innovation," von Klemperer says, "we can combine water transport with localised energy production, cluster neighbourhood centres, advanced flood prevention and water management, and urban agriculture. Meixi is an experiment in future city planning and building. It will serve Changsha as a new CBD, but it will also serve as a paradigm for other Chinese city planners. It's a kind of live test case."


The firm seeks to achieve these goals through its dense, mixed-use urban, plan, with integration with surrounding mountains, lakes, parks and canals. Meixi Lake will eventually be home to 180,000 inhabitants, living in "villages" of 10,000 people, clustered around the canals...


Via Lauren Moss, association concert urbain