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Urbanisme
Avenir de l'urbanisme, conception des villes, initiatives et perspectives
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Five cities awarded UNESCO City of Design status

Five cities awarded UNESCO City of Design status | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

Dundee, Bilbao, Curitiba, Helsinki and Turin have been awarded UNESCO City of Design status for their input to the international design industry.


The accolade, awarded by international heritage body UNESCO, recognises the contribution of the five cities to the worldwide design industry – each the first in their respective countries of the UK, Spain, Brazil, Finland and Italy to achieve the designation. The scheme aims to promote the development of local creative industries, and to foster relationships and resource-sharing between fellow Cities of Design.


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What if we could rebuild New York City?

What if we could rebuild New York City? | Urbanisme | Scoop.it
New York has become one of the world’s most populous, densely packed cities. What if you could redraw the city’s map – and build it from scratch?


If we were designing New York today, how different would it look?

The new New York City would balance the relationship between the information networks that the metropolis depends on and Earth’s finite resources.

All vital components of life would be monitored and attuned to the needs of every organism, not just humans. Supplies of food and water, our energy and waste and even our air would be sensibly scrutinised. Thanks to masses of miniaturised low-cost electronic components deployed across the city, communication becomes far easier. New York will grow and adapt to millions of new minds entering it everyday.

The city would make sure every need is provided for within its borders. How we provide nutrients, transports, and shelter would be updated. Dilapidated buildings would be replaced with vertical agriculture and new kinds of housing would join cleaner, greener ways to get around the city. What were once streets become snaking arteries of livable spaces, embedded with renewable energy sources, low-tech, green vehicles for mobility and productive nutrient zones. The former street grid could provide the foundation for new flexible networks. By reengineering the obsolete streets, we can create robust and ecologically active pathways.

While all this may sound optimistic, some of this city of tomorrow is already taking shape...


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Norm Miller's curator insight, April 18, 2:36 PM

What a great academic exercise!  The question is really applicable to all new cities and city undergoing renovation.  More mixed use, greener, better transport systems, more shared everything and more self-sufficient describe the plan.

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The Urban Landscape: Designing With Cities, Not For Them

The Urban Landscape: Designing With Cities, Not For Them | Urbanisme | Scoop.it
When the city is viewed not as a destination for design but as the source material for it, a new relationship between design and the urban landscape is possible.

Whether it’s repurposing a billboard to act as a humidity collection system for clean drinking water in Lima, Peru, or integrating Wi-Fi capabilities into Madrid’s paving stones with the iPavement initiative, cities are increasingly expanding the capabilities of their existing assets and reforming the urban terrain as a landscape of opportunity.


The truth is that a city has all the resources it needs; the key to unlocking these resources is seeing the urban landscape not as the end result of a previous creative process, but as the beginning of a new onea landscape to design with, not for.


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Smart Cities + Green Megaprojects of the Future

Smart Cities + Green Megaprojects of the Future | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

For many years, architects and city planners from around the world have been trying to create the green ideal: an entire city built to strict environmental standards- highly functional while still retaining aesthetic value.


Here’s a look at some green building and community design that caught our attention in recent months and may (or may not) become reality in the next several years. Their physical footprints may be large, but by using features such as wind power, solar, rainwater recycling and advanced air quality controls, their carbon footprints don't have to be...


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Mercor's curator insight, January 2, 2013 6:33 AM

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Norm Miller's curator insight, January 2, 2013 4:32 PM

This is going beyond Mazdar in Dubai.  The reality is that we need to transform existing cities since starting from scratch is rare.  We need to retrofit cities more than build new ones, but still it is interesting.

Alexandre Pépin's curator insight, March 4, 2013 6:31 AM

 

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Design et nouvelles technologies dans la ville

Design et nouvelles technologies dans la ville | Urbanisme | Scoop.it
Concentration humaine et bien-être font rarement bon ménage. Depuis quelques années, architectes et urbanistes, décideurs et designers s'emploient donc à remodeler le visage des villes de demain, au gré des engagements financiers et politiques. Design et nouvelles technologies sont là pour les accompagner. Partout dans le monde, des expérimentations voient le jour, pour améliorer la vie urbaine. Paris n'est pas en reste : des projets fleurissent aux quatre coins de la cité.

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A Concept Twin-Tower Skyscraper In Hong Kong

A Concept Twin-Tower Skyscraper In Hong Kong | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

Mexican design firm Studio Cachoua Torres Camilletti has designed and developed an ambitious concept that reimagines skyscrapers. 
The concept is 92-stories-high and consists of two parts—for housing and for commerce, linked by bridges. The architects also have an unusual plan to install rice paddies on the roof. 
One of the architects, Adrian Cachoua Oropeza explained that “the farming on the top of the building is an important symbolic gesture as well as an environmental one,” as rice is a staple in Asian countries.
This idea was submitted for the 2014 World Architecture Festival


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Norm Miller's curator insight, August 27, 4:15 PM

It's another integration of nature with design but the building looks  a little more like King Kong than Hong Kong

thierry Grey's curator insight, August 30, 9:59 AM

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Designing Parking Garages With a Car-less Future in Mind

Designing Parking Garages With a Car-less Future in Mind | Urbanisme | Scoop.it
Building adaptable structures will save time, money, and material waste.

There's a growing belief among architects and designers that all urban parking garages should be built with these "good bones," which will allow them to be re-purposed in the future. For a variety of reasons, from higher gas prices to greater densification to better transit options, city residents will continue to drive fewer cars. As a result, we'll eventually require fewer parking lots. The ability to adapt a structure rather than tear it down will save developers time, money, and material waste...


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Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | #smartcities

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | #smartcities | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

 In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)


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luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 5:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.

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CO2ngress Towers: Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness

CO2ngress Towers:  Reducing air pollution in Chicago + increasing public awareness | Urbanisme | Scoop.it

““Every day, 77,000 carbon-emitting vehicles fly past the Congress Parkway interchange, polluting the air. This project creates a gateway over the corridor that filters air and fuels a new breed of car for its residents.”


In attempt to cut down on Chicago’s CO2 emissions produced from cars in the Eisenhower Expressway, Danny Mui & Benjamin Sahagun propose the splitting of the Congress Gateway Towers, using a system of carbon scrubbers and filtration devices that clean carbon dioxide and other air pollutants. Aimed to increase public awareness and improve of Chicago’s public health, the CO2ngress Gateway Towers absorb the CO2 emissions from passing cars and is then fed to algae grown in the building. The algae then helps with the processing of biofuels which will supply the building residents’ eco-friendly cars.


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Samantha Hedrick's curator insight, October 2, 2013 8:31 PM

I thought that this article was really cool that Chicago was going to build these towers as the gateway to this city. At the same time, I thought it was cool that it acts as a CO2 remover. It sucks up the carbon dioxide from the vehicles of the city and gets rid of it. I think it would be great if other cities could do this also to reduce the pollution.

Kenzie Nossaman's comment, October 4, 2013 9:19 AM
After reading this article I thought it was really cool that Chicago is trying to make a difference. I didn't know that a simple building could make should a huge difference. This article is very interesting!
abbby grace oberg's curator insight, August 26, 9:41 AM

This is important for people to know just encase they go to the same place as it is happening.