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Nowa Huta: City of the Future Proposal

Nowa Huta: City of the Future Proposal | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

The design for the Nowa Huta of the Future focused on the exploitation of the close relation to the nature and the nearby river landscape, fresh food supply from the local agriculture production fields, and a variety of recreational activities to add to the distinctive quality to the plan. Designed by Basic City A+U in collaboration with Felixx landscape architects, the thought was that Nowa Huta should become a city where the entrepreneurial spirit and optimism are combined with an active and healthy lifestyle in close relation to the nature.

Reinvention of the non-operating industrial land of the Arcelor Mittal steel industry complex into a seedbed of the new age industries is the base of the proposal. Revitalization of the existing historic villages by both preserving the historic ambient and densifying via introduction of a variety of residential typologies complete the collection of the cornerstones for the Nowa Huta’s future spatial development...

The vitality of every city in such a situation depends on its ability to find its latent qualities and reinforce its existing unique identities. It must reinvent itself using the assets at hand, propose realistic goals avoiding falling into a labyrinth of local ambitions, rather finding its place in a wider context, regional and European. It must optimally use its material resources and challenge its human potential to perform therefore securing a long-term success of its development.


Via Lauren Moss
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Virtual Water: Motion Graphics

Virtual Water: Motion Graphics | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

Most of the water we use - 92 % of it - is used in food production. Most of this water is managed by the world’s farmers. With the help of science and technology they have performed greater and greater miracles in improving water productivity – in getting more crops per drop.

The good news is that each one of us can also make the world a little more water secure, ready to face the needs of our peak population future.

The answer lies in our shopping baskets...


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A Master Plan for Cultural and Ecological Urbanism...

A Master Plan for Cultural and Ecological Urbanism... | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

“This planning proposal seeks to determine community and bio-diversity from its historical pattern. The concept finds fundamental inspiration in the strong historical identity of the local railway line, and the historic identity of industrialization of Kaohsiung city.

Inspired by the culturally and biologically responsive between the new city urban fabric and existing old town Yen Chan district, the guiding principle of the master plan is to inspire a meaningful sense of community and a shared commitment to social and environmental responsibility.

The proposal also introduces a series of urban agriculture farming and integrated parks. The strategy is to infiltrate and to conceal the community and biological diversity from the nearby Wan Shu Mountain. It also reflects the historical transformation of Kaohsiung city from industrial city to a contemporary cityscape.”


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Wall-to-wall greenery: Stunning vertical garden brings the countryside to the city

Wall-to-wall greenery: Stunning vertical garden brings the countryside to the city | Urban rurality | Scoop.it
The huge wall garden at the shopping centre in Rozzano, Milan, which has a total of 44,000 plants covering a surface of 1263 square metres, is the largest vertical garden in the world.

The finished result at The Fiordaliso commercial complex was certified by Guinness Wold Records as being the largest vertical garden in the world in 2010.

The project was designed by architect Francesco Bollani, who led a creative team that included an architecture studio from Montpellier. France. Bollani said: 'It took us a year to grow the plants in a greenhouse and 90 days to build the facade.'

The garden serves in helping to regulate the temperature in the shopping centre in Rozzano. It also absorbs carbon dioxide and reduces ambient noise, creating a sustainable architecture that combines beauty with energy savings, and a respect for the environment...


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Diana Rivera's curator insight, March 3, 2013 2:34 PM

This beautiful design was created to bring life and color to the city where greens have been forgotten.