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Beyond separative modern urbanism: looking for the connective design that's already 'out there'

Beyond separative modern urbanism: looking for the connective design that's already 'out there' | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

But there’s a problem. We have fractured these urban networks, and rebuilt much more dispersed, “dendritic” systems, connected not by pedestrians, but by automobiles, dispersed suburban campuses and parks, and single-family monocultures, supplemented by telephones and now, computers. The majority of us lives in encapsulated houses, in encapsulated neighborhoods, and travel in encapsulated cars to encapsulated work places, stores and other destinations. - Michael Mehaffy


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Harvard’s New Ecological Urbanism App: A Glimpse of Our Urban Future

Harvard’s New Ecological Urbanism App: A Glimpse of Our Urban Future | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

The Harvard Graduate School of Design released its Ecological Urbanism app last month. The interactive app adapts content from the GSD book of the same name, which explores how designers can unite urbanism with environmentalism.


Combining data from around the world, the app “reveals and locates current practices, emerging trends, and opportunities for new initiatives” in regard to the future of cities.


A collaboration between the school and Second Story Interactive Studios,the app stems from the GSD’s Ecological Urbanism conference and dovetails with the duo’s ongoing efforts to explore sustainability in our cities of the future.

More than 100 participating architects and designers have provided content for the project, including such heavyweights as OMA, Rem Koolhaas, Kara Oehler, and Stefano Boeri. And the ever-evolving app allows designers and academics to add research and project updates as they happen...


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Farm Hack

Farm Hack | Urban rurality | Scoop.it
Farm Hack is a farmer-driven community to develop, document and build tools for resilient agriculture.

 

We accelerate this process by connecting farmers with other farmers, engineers, designers, architects and other allies through in-person events on farms, at institutions, or in grange halls, and through an online forum.

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Critical Geographies: A Collection of Readings (PDF)

Critical Geographies: A Collection of Readings (PDF) | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

Edited by Harald Bauder and Salvatore Engel-Di Mauro, "Critical Geographies" introduces students, scholars and activists to wide-ranging approaches, topics and theories associated with critical geographical scholarship. A selection of thirty-six chapters of previously published work, spanning over 150 years, is organized into four thematic sections with editorial introductions, addressing the themes of critical reflection within academic geography, theorizing the relationship between space and society, outlining geographical approaches towards human-environment relations, and a critical view on representing Earth. 


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WikiCity – How Citizens can Improve their Cities

WikiCity – How Citizens can Improve their Cities | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

When governments don’t build infrastructure, citizens usually complain but can’t do much about it. However, this model of participation is being rethought by citizens around the world.


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The World According to Monsanto

The World According to Monsanto | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

RT @PermaMEDIA: The World According to Monsanto http://t.co/NYLNWGvN...


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Detroit’s Urban Agriculture Movement Could Help ‘Green’ the City

Detroit’s Urban Agriculture Movement Could Help ‘Green’ the City | Urban rurality | Scoop.it
In 1989 Detroit's residents formed the organization Greening of Detroit, a project originally established in order to improve the city's suffering ecosystem.

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Long-running experiment shows organic farming is profitable | Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture

Long-running experiment shows organic farming is profitable | Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

Organic crop systems can provide similar yields and much higher economic returns than a conventional corn-soybean rotation, according to thirteen years of data from a side-by-side comparison at Iowa State University’s Neely-Kinyon Research and Demonstration Farm.


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Urban Agriculture | Directory of online and urban agriculture videos.

Urban Agriculture | Directory of online and urban agriculture videos. | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

urban agriculture videos

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Japan portable farm heads for Qatar

Japan portable farm heads for Qatar | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

Japan portable farm heads for Qatar...

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Understanding the rise of rooftop farming

Understanding the rise of rooftop farming | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

Pearched atop a six-story building at 37-18 Northern Boulevard in Long Island City Queens, tucked high above the city streets is the Brooklyn Grange, a 40,000 Sq. Ft. roof top commercial farm.


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How cities are using nature to cut pollution

How cities are using nature to cut pollution | Urban rurality | Scoop.it
Yale Environment 360: From paying for the Catskill forests so they can filter water to building rain gardens to slow run-off, 'green infrastructure' is in demand from Seattle to Sweden...

 

In Puget Sound, one of America's great estuaries, killer whales, seals, and schools of salmon swim not far from more than 3 million people who live in the Seattle region. The presence of such impressive marine life, however, belies the fact that the sound is seriously polluted.

 

When it rains, storm water washes into the same system of underground pipes that carries the region's sewage, and 1 billion gallons a year overflow into the sound when area sewer systems contain more water than can be treated. In addition, motor oil, lawn chemicals, PCBs, heavy metals, pet waste, and many other substances run unabated into the sound, both through the storm water pipes and from roads and other shoreline structures. "The biggest threat to Puget Sound is non-point sources [of pollution]," says Nancy Ahern, Seattle Public Utilities deputy director. ...


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A AS ARCHITECTURE: LEVI VAN VELUW LANDSCAPE SCENES

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Climate and the use of urban public spaces - All About Internet

importance of climatically supportive and stimulating outdoor spaces but also the need for new forms Keywords: climate, comfort, public spaces, urban life, outdoor environment PDF format /download/13_keyword-urban-outdoor-thermal-environment/climate-and-the-use-of-urban-public-spaces.pdf...


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Pambazuka - The global food price crisis

Pambazuka - The global food price crisis | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

In an extract from his forthcoming book Food Wars, Walden Bello critiques the orthodox views of economist Paul Collier on the global food price crisis. Collier argues that not enough food was produced to meet increased demand from Asia, thanks to a failure to promote commercial farming in Africa, the European Union ban against GMOs and the diversion of American grain to biofuels production. Bello counters that a globalised system of production has 'created severe strains on the environment', 'marginalised large numbers of people from the market, and contributed to greater poverty and greater income disparities within countries and globally'. Defenders of peasant agriculture, says Bello, blame 'capitalist industrial agriculture, with its wrenching destabilisation and transformation of land, nature, and social relations' for today’s food crises, with 'rates of profit determining where investment will be allocated' rather than the desire to satisfy 'the real needs of the global majority'.

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Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture

Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture | Urban rurality | Scoop.it
There are currently 1 billion people in the world today who are hungry. There's also another billion people who over eat unhealthy foods.

 Food production around the world today is mostly done through industrial agriculture, and by judging current issues with obesity, worldwide food shortages, and the destruction of soil, it may not be the best process. We need to be able to feed our world without destroying it, and finding a more sustainable approach to accomplishing that is becoming more important.

The current system contributes to 1/3 of global emissions, is a polluter of our world’s water resources, and is a contributor to health problems. Industrial agriculture relies on mass produced, mechanized labor-saving policies that have pushed people out of rural areas and into cities, consolidating land and resources into fewer hands.

Agroecology looks to reduces agriculture’s impact on climate by working within natural systems. This is especially beneficial in rural areas, because the local community a major part of the growing process. The approach can conserve and protect soil and water — through terracing, contour farming, intercropping, and agroforestry — especially beneficial in areas where farmers lack modern irrigation infrastructure, or have farms situated on hillsides and other difficult farming sites...


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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, October 1, 2013 9:53 PM

Clearly industrial agriculture is not sustainable, and must be replaced entirely with systems that reverse the current damage and restore the balance that used to exist before we messed things up.  We can use plants and animals not only to feed ourselves, but to *improve* the environment for all life on the planet.

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Edible Infrastructures (AA Emtech Final Project 2011)

"Edible Infrastructures is an investigation into an urbanism which considers food as an integral part of a city's metabolic infrastructure. Working with algorithms as design tools, we explore the generative potential of this system to create an urban ecology that: provides for its residents via local, multi-scalar, distributed food production, reconnects the traditional waste-nutrient cycle, and de-couples food costs from fossil fuels. Our research is conducted through the building of algorithms, beginning with a Settlement Simulation, which couples consumers to productive area, within a cellular automata computational model. Through analysis and interpretation of the output, we explore the hierarchical components for a new Productive City, including: structure & programming of the urban circulatory network, productive urban blocks, & new architectural typologies. The resulting prototypical Productive City questions the underlying mechanisms that shape modern urban space." DARRICK BOROWSKI, JEROEN JANSSEN & NICOLETTA POULIMENI

 

More here: http://edibleinfrastructures.blogspot.co.uk/


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The economic case for urban agriculture | MALAYA Business Insight News Online

The economic case for urban agriculture | MALAYA Business Insight News Online | Urban rurality | Scoop.it
Urban agriculture is simply growing plants and raising livestock within and around cities.

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Food Demand to Double by 2050, Urban Agriculture to Become Increasingly Important

Food Demand to Double by 2050, Urban Agriculture to Become Increasingly Important | Urban rurality | Scoop.it
A new study says that food demand will double by 2050 and the researchers paint a doomsday scenario. Too bad they forgot about sustainable innovations in farming.

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Urban agriculture, a meeting point between urban and rural worlds - French Food in the US

Urban agriculture, a meeting point between urban and rural worlds - French Food in the US | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

Urban agriculture, a meeting point between urban and rural worlds - French Food in the US: http://t.co/EkaXXRiR via @franceintheus...


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Urban gardens: The future of food?

Urban gardens: The future of food? | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

It's easy to make fun of, but as more and more farming moves downtown, eating local is taking on a new flavor...


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Lexicon of Sustainability: Food sovereignty

Lexicon of Sustainability: Food sovereignty | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

Editor’s note: This is the second in a weekly installment of images from Douglas Gayeton and Laura Howard-Gayeton’s Lexicon of Sustainability. We’ll be running one image every Friday this win...


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The Future of Food: 11 Unique Urban Farming Projects

The Future of Food: 11 Unique Urban Farming Projects | Urban rurality | Scoop.it
Cities around the world are becoming hot beds for urban farming. We look at some compelling ideas in Japan, the U.K. and the U.S., from personal projects to multimillion dollar innovations.

Via Alan Yoshioka, FarmRoof®
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The City as an Ecosystem

The City as an Ecosystem | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

We need to find new ways of talking about our shared challenges and visions of what a ‘good’ result of ‘sustainable’ development are. Sustainability, like everything else in this modern age that has purchase, has been abstracted and productized to become data sets of carbon counts and LEED standards – as a kind of industrial conservation exercise – that will respond to some greenwash and re-branding. Cities themselves are not broken. The concrete and brick and steel are not accountable for our damaging environmental practices – yet we find a way to absolve ourselves of the consequences of our choices by blaming their material properties. In my view, the term ‘sustainability’ indicates the need for a systemic change in thinking and these dialogues need to be kept alive across generations.


Via Alan Yoshioka, FarmRoof®
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Urban Greenhouse in Rotterdam to be new city icon

Urban Greenhouse in Rotterdam to be new city icon | Urban rurality | Scoop.it

A group of urban agriculturists hope to put Rotterdam on track as a healthy, green, and delicious city. Selected by the Stadsinitiatieven (City Initiatives), the group has proposed to build a giant greenhouse in the area next to the opening of a train tunnel, a space that has been difficult to maintain environmentally and financially.

 

The greenhouse would grow organic produce, herbs, and flowers for markets and the designers of the greenhouse are aiming to transform this building into a new icon for the city.


Via Alan Yoshioka, FarmRoof®
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