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The 30 Architecture Docs To Watch In 2013

The 30 Architecture Docs To Watch In 2013 | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it
With awards season in full swing, Hollywood's sparkly razamtaz occupies our television screens. But what about the unsung, architectural heros of film?
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Good recomendation to start well in 2013: the 30 architecture docs to watch this year!.

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polis: Revisiting Urban Economics

polis: Revisiting Urban Economics | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it
A post that brings back old memories of LSE Urban Economics class!
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GREAT publication: Bogotá 21: Towards a World-Class Transit-Oriented Metropolis (also available in Spanish)

Executive Summary:

 

This book provides strategic advice on development

priorities for Bogotá by looking at the metropolis from

an angle different than is traditionally used by planners

 

To do so, we analysed how the city performs

across a broad array of criteria defining the quality

of urban life. Hence, we benchmarked Bogotá against

world-class cities, such as Paris and New York, labelled

the “capitals” of the 19th and 20th centuries.

 

The benchmark provides the background for a SWOT

analysis (Strengths and Weaknesses of today and the

Opportunities and Threats of tomorrow), and thus

forms the basis for proposing the most appropriate

direction for the future development of Bogotá. This

direction is expressed by the sub-title of the initiative:

“towards a world-class, transit-oriented metropolis.”

The initiative identifies priority measures and proposes

immediate actions for selected projects, many of

them transit-related. This emphasis is because the improvement

of the transportation system in general,

and the public transit system in particular, contributes

the most to the greater good in a megacity like Bogotá.

The Bogotá 21 initiative looks into the budget needed

to transform Bogotá into a top-performing metropolis

by 2050. After optimising the portfolio of investments,

we recommend most suitable budget allocations to

the main areas of infrastructure development, in order

to identify the minimum investment budget.

This amount, about 4.2% of the national Gross Domestic

Product (GDP), needs to be spent annually to

develop Bogotá into a world-class, transit-oriented

metropolis. However, this cost would not be spent for

the development of Bogotá alone, but also for the development

and the benefit of Colombia as a whole.

Two guiding principles were applied when carrying out

this initiative. The first is to maintain a fair balance of

benefits for Bogotá and the country as a whole. The

second principle is to practise moderation and avoid

any kind of overspending towards luxury, beyond

what is sufficient.

About one third of the proposed investment would be

dedicated to the development of the nation, especially

of the transportation infrastructure, including inland

waterways, railways, and roads. This would help Bogotá

live up to the needs of the nation as the central logistics

hub of Colombia, and also cut the tremendous

cost of logistics that prevail today.

* * *

If the investment portfolio proposed by the Bogotá 21

Initiative were to be implemented, then the city would

be on par with metropolises such as Berlin, New York

and Paris by 2050. It would become a candidate for

the honourable title, “capital of the 21st century".

 

It is not a dream, it is an option.

 

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After Sandy, New Yorkers Turn to Bikes

After Sandy, New Yorkers Turn to Bikes | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it
With public transportation crippled and traffic moving at a snail's pace in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, many New Yorkers are rediscovering the joys of bike riding, either digging their old bikes out of the basement or buying their first one.
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Open Urban

Open Urban | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it

OpenUrban is the first open source user-generated web map and forum focusing on current and proposed urban development. It is a web platform for civic collaboration, a venue for debate, and an outlet and archive for information on urban development. We embrace crowd sourcing technology as a means to inform and empower. By combining written media with spatial information OpenUrban creates a powerful tool for people to understand how their cities are changing and supports their active participation in that change.


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Japan’s urban agriculture: cultivating sustainability and well-being - OurWorld 2.0 | OurWorld 2.0

Policies supporting city farmers will enhance local ecosystem services and biodiversity while also reducing urban footprints.
Great post on urban farming. Interesting topics of green economy, fooding and compact city challenges for planners. http://bit.ly/PB4JXc
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Downloads: Cities of Opportunity

Downloads: Cities of Opportunity | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it

Download the full report of 2012 edition of PwC’s Cities of Opportunity.

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Basic bike prettied up with a high-end brand GUCCI worth $14.000 !! Who would really buy that?

Basic bike prettied up with a high-end brand GUCCI worth $14.000 !! Who would really buy that? | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it
MarketWatchA bicycle built for the 2%MarketWatchEnter Italian style titan Gucci, which has partnered with bicycle maker Bianchi to produce a $14,000 urban and off-road bike.
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Smart City Bike by Yo-Hwan Kim » Yanko Design

Smart City Bike by Yo-Hwan Kim » Yanko Design | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it
Why not optimizing wheel space to store object while cycling?I love the idea for Smart Cities'mobility.
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Park(ing) Day

Park(ing) Day | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it

PARK(ing) Day is an annual worldwide event where artists, designers and citizens transform metered parking spots into temporary public parks.


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Innovation : oubliez les bonnes pratiques, pensez aux bonnes personnes | Economie de la fonctionnalité , la dernière révolution industrielle

Innovation : oubliez les bonnes pratiques, pensez aux bonnes personnes | Economie de la fonctionnalité , la dernière révolution industrielle | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it

L’alternative proposée à l’utilisation des «meilleures pratiques» en tant qu’outil de management est de se concentrer plutôt sur les «meilleures personnes » : dans chaque domaine fonctionnel important pour votre organisation, découvrez qui sont les...


Via François GARREAU, D'Dline 2020 ✏
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Top 5 Of The Greatest Urban Rooftop Farms — The Pop-Up City

Top 5 Of The Greatest Urban Rooftop Farms — The Pop-Up City | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it
Urban farming has become one of the major international urban trends — a good reason for us to make a Top 5 of the greatest rooftop farms we've come across over the last years.
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100 Urban Trends: A Glossary of Ideas from the BMW Guggenheim Lab Berlin

100 Urban Trends: A Glossary of Ideas from the BMW Guggenheim Lab Berlin | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it
  Between June 15 through July 29, 2012, the BMW Guggenheim Lab Berlin offered thirty-three days of free programs, including workshops, screenings, and tours, and implemented urban projects in Berlin neighborhoods and online—all centered around the...

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"The Image of the City" by Kevin Lynch

"This book will consider the visual quality of the American city by studying the mental image of that city which is held by its citizens. It will concentrate especially on one particular visual quality: the apparent clarity or "legibility" of the cityscape. By this we mean the ease with which its part can be recognized and can be organized into a coherent pattern. [...] This book will assert that legibility is crucial in the city setting, will analyze it in some detail, and will try to show how this concept might be used today in rebuilding our cities."

 

Just the first and fourth chapter of Kevin Lynch's "The Image of the City" (1960), one of the most relevant books regarding planning and urban design, as it introduced for the first time the idea of understanding the city not as an object in itself, but as a system perceived by its inhabitants. Unmissable reading even today...

 

Remember this picture of Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin? Kevin Lynch is the second sitting student from the left:  http://designmuseum.org/__entry/4924?style=design_image_popup


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YACOUBAHIEN's curator insight, February 8, 2014 4:17 PM

Essential book for environmental psyschology!

 

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doyoucity - Inicio

doyoucity - Inicio | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it

doyoucity es un entorno colaborativo de elaboración de proyectos-retos.

Navega por los territorios de losdoyoucities existentes y participa en su desarrollo.


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The Rich World's 'Peak Car' Moment: Car-Sharing, Carpooling, Car-Ignoring

The Rich World's 'Peak Car' Moment: Car-Sharing, Carpooling, Car-Ignoring | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it
The future of Cars is today! and this article is a good illistration of new trends and cultural changes happening now in drivers' behaviour.

Today's news of explosive car-pooling companies in Europe is a glimpse into a broader trend: Car-driving and car-owning metrics are peaking across the developed world.

Today's news of explosive car-pooling companies in Europe is a glimpse into a broader trend: Car-driving and car-owning metrics are peaking across the developed world

When it comes to cars and young people in America, every trend line is pointing down-right. Car sales? Down 11 percentage points. License ownership? Down 28 percent. Miles driven? Falling fast. Car companies hope this is a peculiar outcome of the U.S. recession. But in fact, the move away from cars is bigger than the U.S. (and bigger than the recession).

Carpooling is the new rage in Europe, the New York Times reports this morning, where Paris-based BlaBlaCar and Munich's Carpooling.com are "global leaders in ride-sharing." The companies claim more than 6 million combined users (some overlap is probable), and their growth has even attracted the attention of Silicon Valley investors. Their success parallels Zipcar, the foundational American car-sharing company, which claims 700,000 members in the United States.

Who wants to invest in a hippie-dippie scheme to monetize carpools? Somebody looking at the bigger picture.

Maybe something like this picture, right there on the left. As the world's richest economies pack densely into cities to escape the new normal of gasoline prices, miles driven in passenger vehicles have either hit a ceiling or started to decline in the U.S., Japan, Germany, the UK, and France. Australia has seen the same decline in car travel. The most important detail in this graph is along the X-axis: The decline in average car miles isn't a recession trend. It's just a trend. In the U.S., the global capitol of car enthusiasts, total miles traveled peaked in 2004, the Economist reported, and per-person travel hit a peak in 2000.

As Jordan Weissmann and I reported, car marketers are both accepting and pushing back against the "peak car" moment in the West. They understand that a weak economy makes big-ticket purchases hard. They understand that young people are getting crushed between expensive education and cheap jobs. They accept that cars have lost that halo of hipness they owned in the 1970s. But they also see a future beyond peak car abroad.

In 2011, the world added 60 million new cars. The United States bought 12 million of them. Europe bought another 13 million, and Japan bought about 2 million, the lowest since the late 1960s. That means that about half of last year's new car sales came from developing economies, for whom "peak car" is a date far in the future.

A Deloitte study from 2011 looked at the market for cars in Brazil, Russia, India, and China (which, alone, accounts for more car sales than either Europe or the United States). That story in a nutshell: In 2001, none of these countries bought more than 1.5 million cars. Last year, they accounted for more than 20 million total car sales (China grabbed 14.5 million, slightly below the estimate in the graph below).

But developing countries will reach their "carpooling moment" much faster than the West. In the next few years, their projected growth will slow. Brazil's economy is retrenching fast, while growth in India and China is slowing down at a rate that is frightening economists. But even with strong growth from all the BRICs, there are structural challenges. Jakarta, cars are growing ten times faster than road construction, the Economist reported, and massive public transit like the Shanghai metro (which covers 80% of the city and carries 8 million people a day) provide a persuasive alternative to cars in a $4-a-gallon world -- or whatever gas prices are ten years from now.

In fact, ten years from now, the most important story in cars might not be peak car, but driverless cars.
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Cities of Opportunity 2012

Cities of Opportunity 2012 | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it
What factors make a city a global powerhouse? PwC analyses the trajectory of 27 capitals of finance, commerce, intellectual capital and/or manufacturing and examines future trends.

GREAT database for planners in City of Opportunity. Although, it seem to Important to take into consideration much more cities with great potential like Bogota, for future report in the years to come.

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Vancouver Car Spaces Transforming into People Places

Vancouver Car Spaces Transforming into People Places | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it

[Looking for Something to Do or Somewhere to Be During these Summer Weekends? Regular Spacing Contributor - Urban Designer Brendan Hurley looks at the new public spaces and street festivals in Vancouver, but reveals a summer full of fun in to be had town. Events listed below!]

Vancouver is changing, one street at a time. The City has made some specific efforts to foster pedestrian activity and a walking culture that is more than the ordinary stroll. One-time and regular events have been burgeoning through Vancouver’s Streets and these walkabouts have revealed how shifting how we use streets in the City help to markedly change how the city itself functions and is experienced.

The successful events that have happened and are still happening during these not so lazy days of summer show that a demand for using public space and civic activity on the ground is strong in Vancouver. Yet, that demand warrants the pursuit of policies now that would have seemed like distant pipe dreams without such examples.

Viva Vancouver and Transport 2040:

Vancouver’s Transportation 2040 Draft Plan has outlined some of the ways the extension of activities can be made by the City into streets, rights of way, and parking areas to make pedestrian and other activities thrive in what is commonly considered sacred space for cars. Some of its proposals point directly to pedestrian infrastructure improvement, but some include a push towards new public spaces including a “Pavement to Plazas” program that will focus on shifting the use of key parking stalls in high traffic areas that can be reutilized and reprogrammed into public open spaces. [An early effort is Parralel Park off Main St. on 14th Avenue.] There is also a striking support for permitting for events that repurpose streets for festivals and other events – both reoccurring and singular.

One of the successful first forays into the development of this pedestrian culture is the VIVA Vancouver Project. Viva Vancouver working off of the success of Olympic festival events and a few pilot projects has greatly expanded this summer. As part of Viva Vancouver there have been a number of street closures that have vastly increased pedestrian space and activity in the downtown core over the summer. Granville Street has been blocked to even bus traffic on the weekends as seating, buskers and most importantly people fill into the street. Some of the this programs most amazing improvements to public space, however, have been showing up on Robson Street.

 

#1 - Robson Street Parklet [Urban Pasture]:

The decking, vegetation, and wooden bench add space to walk, socialize, and eat. [Photo John Paul Catungal]
In the last few weeks there has been a pleasant surprise outside the door of Café Crêpe on Robson Street: An extension of the sidewalk build of wood decking has been placed in the equivalent of two on-street parking stalls that includes benches and planters.

A little primer:
Robson Street was originally surveyed as just another residential street of the West End at a 66 foot width. With the early inclusion of a streetcar –now trolley-bus– the street drew retail and pedestrian traffic that is now often tracked as some of the most consistently busy in the Metro Vancouver region. In the late ‘70s a policy to set back new developments was imposed on the street to ensure that the street would act with an 80 foot right-of-way – consistent with standard retail high-street rights-of-way. Problems in the pedestrian space of Robson arise where older buildings, like the Café Crêpe, among others, jut into that wider right-of-way and pinch sidewalk widths below the ability to service pedestrian loads.

The parklet shows the potential to use parking spaces to accomodate far more street users than the two cars that the space would have otherwise been used for. Beyond opening up pedestrian movement space, the wooden structure is lined with an angular bench with a variety of seating opportunities and a planter box edge that separates the spot from the travel lane beside it. This mix of smooth wood and vegetation makes for a comfortable place to sit and grab a bite, something that helps the Café especially as they have a front facing takeaway window that exacerbates crowding on this section of an already busy street.

#2 - Robson Square Summertime Plaza:

Tables and chairs in Robson Square are activating the space and providing a day and night time program. [Photo: Brendan Hurley]

A pedestrianized Robson Square has been the goal of many a planner for decades. An early attempt more than 30 years ago caused traffic chaos. At that time the Cambie Street Bridge exited directly onto Robson and the street acted as a major arterial – its not hard to imagine the pandemonium at Robson and Howe if you added the traffic that now goes up Smithe to the mix. Ever since the engineering department of the City has been wary of shutting down Robson to through-traffic. However, whether through constant badgering or because of the success of the space as an open plaza during the Olympics, the pedestrianization of Robson Square is getting an extended chance to thrive this summer.

Last summer seating was provided as part of the Viva Vancouver program by an artificial lawn installation. This year a more quaint, yet powerful system has been put in place... tables and chairs. Large umbrellas have been placed in the travel lanes that divide the centrally located public space, and under them are a large number of foldable and durable metal chairs and tables. They are strikingly similar to sets used in Paris and NYC's Bryant Park.

#3 - Granville Street’s Great White Way

Some of the City's first attempts at opening up a redesigned Granville Street happened during the 2010 Olympics festivities. [Image: City of Vancouver]
The PWL redesignof Granville Street was on of the first big forays into this brave new world of urbane mixing of uses and priorities for Vancouver’s streets. The strip long known for its neon and lights gained a powerful unifying design element with the installation of vertical lit lamp posts. The effect at night is a ribbon of light that lives up to the much older nickname of the “Great White Way”. The design allows for vehicular space to be shifted back and forth into the streets. Parking lanes can easily be appropriated for sidewalk space deeper in the central business and club districts are shut off to traffic – even busses – on weekend evenings.
This action of blocking vehicular traffic along one of Vancouver’s most important retail streets has opened up possibilities for summer time activities that include performances and events.

On Saturday August 4th the second annual Veg Fest is filling up the Block of Granville between Robson and Georgia to present some of the City’s best vegetarian and vegan foodcarts and vendors.

#4 - The Amazing Grilled Cheese Giveaway

The Amazing Grilled Cheese Giveaway shut down a residential street and drew in passers by on bikes and foot. [Photo: Brendan Hurley]
On Saturday July 28th[Sorry Cheese fans you’ll have to wait until this time next year] Toby Amrit and Joni McKervey, amongst others, organized a small street festival for passers by in front of their home in Strathcona. In what has now become an annual event, the two along with neighbours, friends and random volunteers closed off the Union Bikeway and set up a grilled cheese party for any and all who chose to take part.
Using funds including a grant from the Vancouver Foundation along with a strong sense of the power of civic altruism, this festival showed what happens when people take over their street with a mind to making a people place and simple fun. A grill station and tent was matched with party music and cheesy sandwich art and signage.

While planned and seemingly approved, the event had a feeling of random happenstance and community mindedness that has often felt missing from the larger public events and festivals in the city. It was very bohemian, with bikes strewn and piled on the pavement and smiling faces. Some inspired to add other foods and drinks to the festivities others just surprised that to be offered a comfort food treat with no strings attached.

I can’t wait to see what happens next year. This event also provides optimism for what can be achieved if there is a stronger and more consistent policy to support community events, especially when it takes up the street for this kind of civically minded block party.

I can’t wait to see what happens next year. [To watch highlights of this years festivities check out the Grilled Cheese TV that was set up.]

#5 - East Van's Food Cart Festival:

The Food Cart Fest in East Van was packed with people hungry for a taste of street food. [Photo: Lenore Newman]

On a more organized and commercially minded level of vehicle space appropriation the East Van Food Cart Fest is taking over the parking lot beside the Waldorf Hotel. The food cart pilot program has been in effect downtown changing the street food fare of this city to a new level beyond mere hot dogs - previously enforced as the only approvable street food by the Vancouver-Richmond Health Authority… and the City. But this festival strikes a chord and evokes the presence of the Food Pods in our Cascadian sister to the South – Portland, OR.

Dozens of food trucks and carts took over and lined the Waldorf’s parking lot with the bustling activity of expectant foodies in lines of hungry, yet happy revelers. Unlike the Portland prototype this pod faces inwards containing those partaking the fare – from the papusas to the perogies – inside the parking lot just off of Hastings. Tables and DJ booths were set up along with a legal bar cordoned off of the building edge of the Waldorf.

Using festival exemptions the Food Cart Fest is showing some of the best that the City has given coveted licenses to, along with some that seem to still be waiting on approval [fingers crossed]. The massive popularity of Sunday’s event, especially in such an out of the way location shows that a food pod might be a great weekend or seasonal addition to a surface parking lot somewhere else in the City, especially somewhere more central and active.

Food Cart Fest at the Waldorf is continuing every Sunday until Sept 2nd.

#6 - Livable Laneways:

Filling the T-Lane behind Main & Broadway. [Image: Livable Laneways Vancouver
Usually when planners talk about pedestrianizing streets we are referring to retail high streets or high traffic areas. The livable lane project that has been part of Viva Vancouver has been taking the concept of streets for people to a much smaller scale. The Livable Lanes project in the lane west of Main between Broadway and 8th Avenue is showing what potential the smaller rights of way that permeate our city can reach. There have been a number of festivals in the city over the years that have focused on programming a lane, but there have been few that
This Saturday August 4th the Mount Pleasant BIA is presenting the Smoking Sausage BBQ Competition as part of the Livable Laneways events. The Cook-Off will be happening between 5pm and 9pm.

[Also to look out for this August Long Weekend]

#7 - Powell Street Festival:

Vancouver’s annual Japanese community event returns to the Oppenheimer Park this year. With food, dancing, and celebration of Japanese Canadian culture in Vancouver. The side streets are take over for food and festivities while the park itself acts as the main stage and core of the action.

Drop in on the festivities on Saturday August 4th and Sunday the 5th.

#8 - Celebration of Light:

Vancouver’s annual fireworks competition, these years sponsored by Honda, is underway, and Saturday August 4th is the last night. The atmosphere down at the end of Davie and Denman Streets is becoming more and more of a carnival. By showtime around 10pm the streets are packed with revelers and are locked down to cars. This year even more than before there has been an effort by organizers to focus on getting people of their cars to enjoy the night. The West End has been all but blocked off to incoming traffic, and connections to transit have been beefed up.

By the end of the night the massive crowds flow and filter through the streets and lanes of these seaside neighbourhoods. It’s interesting to think about the growth and changes that have happened with this festival since decades past when people gathered around English Bay to watch fireworks.

#9 - Pride Parade:

Everyone loves a parade, but it is something that isn’t as common of a sight in Vancouver. Pride is different, as one of the city’s most popular parades and street festivals, it fills the streets of Downtown with people and activity, with a flare of Carnivale. The Sunday celebration of GBLT culture [August 5th from noon] in the city runs along Robson, Denman, and Beach ending at Sunset beach for the usual party. The other party is the street festival that fills the Davie Village with even more life. Previous years have even seen temporary bars and dance halls set up in the travel way. Some critique that it has become much less of a statement than a corporate event, but the power of this festival and parade and the party atmosphere that is at its core has provided lessons for many of the other events that have since been following in the steps of celebrating life in the city by dancing in the streets.

•••

Brendan Hurley is a local urban designer who focuses on planning for adaptive neighbourhood change. His recent work has been internationally focused, but is strongly rooted in his native Vancouver. Living and working out of the heart of downtown, he remains keenly focused on the region’s development and history. Brendan is acting as Assistant Editor of Spacing Vancouver, but also consults as director of the UrbanCondition design collective.


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On Mexico City's flat roofs, tiny gardens help feed families, provide an urban ... - Kansas City Star

On Mexico City's flat roofs, tiny gardens help feed families, provide an urban ... - Kansas City Star | Urban planning and sustainable mobility | Scoop.it
Mexico City's municipal government has given grants to 3,080 families to build gardens on their rooftop. Urban rooftop gardening is on the cusp of a boom here, sponsored by a City Hall that sees gardening as a way to alleviate poverty, provide residents with their own healthy food and add some green to one of the world’s most populous cities.


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Brève histoire de la densité urbaine & 5 idées pour l'avenir (vidéo)

En un quart d'heure, Kent Larson, architecte et directeur du programme Home_n au MIT, pionnier de l'architecture open source, brosse une histoire de la densité urbaine et la prolonge par un prospective autour de cinq concepts innovants. La vidéo étant à la fois dense et intéressante. Elle rassemble des tendances très actuelles et les illustre avec des exemples concrets. Je vous propose de la regarder ou de lire le petit compte rendu ci-dessous.


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