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what to do to improve our lives in the city where we live
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10 Rules for Smarter Smart Growth in Existing Communities

10 Rules for Smarter Smart Growth in Existing Communities | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Many projects under the banners of smart growth or transit oriented development are simply high density or near transit corridors, or they include gratuitous green space and walking paths.  However, they fail in many of the finer points of smart growth, new urbanism, or transit oriented development.

 

According to Wikipedia, smart growth “advocates compact, transit-oriented, walkable, bicycle-friendly land use, including neighborhood schools, complete streets, and mixed-use development with a range of housing choices.”  The  ”rules” postulated here are meant to supplement rather than reiterate or replace existing Smart Growth or New Urbanism principles.  However, there is some overlap both with existing principles and with each other, as smart growth planning is an imperfect “science.”

These rules attempt to look at the finer points, beyond the density of a project or its proximity to transit corridors, so that in 50 years hindsight, smart growth will have a better record than so much of the planned development of the early post war years (including failed redevelopment projects, affordable housing projects, and suburban residential and commercial projects).


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Lauren Moss's curator insight, April 16, 2013 8:49 PM

A description of smart growth issues that goes a bit more in depth than the general characteristics typically cited...

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the 10 Best Cities for People without Cars

the 10 Best Cities for People without Cars | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Whether you’re a nervous driver or a staunch supporter of mass transit to reduce your carbon footprint, relying solely upon public transportation will require you to live in a city with a suitable public transportation system in place.

According to aupairjobs.com, the 10 U.S. cities at the article link have the best mass transit systems in place and are most well-suited to traveling sans car:

 

New York 

San Francisco

Boston

Washington, DC

 

Philadelphia

Chicago

Seattle 

Miami 

Baltimore

Portland


Find more details at the article link...


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bancoideas's curator insight, March 8, 2013 10:11 AM

las 10 mejores ciudades para la gente sin auto, podrían ser simplementa las 10 mejores ciudades para vivir

Samantha Melvin's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:44 PM

How do people use systems in their every day lives?

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What Really Happens When a City Makes Its Transit System Free?

What Really Happens When a City Makes Its Transit System Free? | Urban Life | Scoop.it
Turns out there is such a thing as a free ride.
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Moving Cities: From Transport to Transaction

Moving Cities: From Transport to Transaction | Urban Life | Scoop.it
Thought Piece from Tim Stonor of Space Syntax  that furthers the debate on activity streets and how mixed mode transport enhances city space and the transactions that underlie a cities dynamics fro...
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Cities Bet They Can Curb Traffic With Games of Chance

Cities Bet They Can Curb Traffic With Games of Chance | Urban Life | Scoop.it
To tackle congestion, clogged urban centers are testing the lure of prizes to persuade motorists to change their driving habits.
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Google amplia informações de trânsito no Brasil - Google Discovery

Google amplia informações de trânsito no Brasil - Google Discovery | Urban Life | Scoop.it
O Google promoveu hoje uma atualização em seu recurso de estimativa das condições do trânsito, do Google Maps, ao adicionar novos países: Belarus,...
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Arup wins Chile metro work

Arup wins Chile metro work | Urban Life | Scoop.it
(London) Arup has been appointed by Metro de Santiago to lead the concept design of 11 stations in the Chilean capital. The scope of the project covers some of the most challenging stations on two ...
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Sua cidade não tem rotas de transporte público no Google Maps? Eis o motivo

Sua cidade não tem rotas de transporte público no Google Maps? Eis o motivo | Urban Life | Scoop.it
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Congestionamentos fazem demanda por trem crescer 150%, diz ...

Congestionamentos fazem demanda por trem crescer 150%, diz ... | Urban Life | Scoop.it
Além disso, é importante desenvolver planos de transporte urbano integrados para as grandes cidades, para garantir um sistema de transporte inclusivo”, disse o economista. Ele acrescentou que, se não houver investimento ...
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NYC Subways Deploy A Touch-Screen Network, Complete With Apps

NYC Subways Deploy A Touch-Screen Network, Complete With Apps | Urban Life | Scoop.it

The designers at Control Group--have been hired by New York’s MTA to bring a plan for bringing a networked, touch-screen system to their subways. Starting this year, 90 touch-screen kiosks will make their way to thoroughfares like Grand Central Station and hip stops like Bedford Avenue. Together, they’ll make a beta network for 2 million commuters and tourists a day.


Each kiosk is a 47-inch touch screen, encapsulated in stainless steel, with an operational temperature up to 200 degrees. They’ll be placed, mostly in pairs, outside pay areas, inside mezzanines and even right on train platforms. Control Group has skinned the hardware with a simple front end and an analytics-heavy backend. And the platform will even support third-party apps approved by the MTA.

At launch, the screens will feature all sorts of content, like delays, outages, and, of course, ads (which bring in $100 million in revenue for the MTA each year, but mostly in paper signage). Yet its most powerful interaction for many will likely be its map, which features a one-tap navigation system.

You look at the map, you tap your intended destination, and the map will draw your route, including any transfers along the way. It’s an interface that puts Google Maps to shame.


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James's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:15 AM

Touch interface has seen a rise in the community, such as information booths.

It allows for easy usability and quick access for people in a hurry.

While it does give convenience to the people, it's another job that's been mechanized because of its efficiency.

 

Touchscreens do away with the harder input devices and allow people to use it little to no prior knowledge of how to access it.

luiy's curator insight, March 21, 2013 10:23 AM

THE POWER OF EXTRA SENSORS

 

At the same time, the system’s screens could be the least interesting part of this project. The kiosks will be fitted with extra modules--video cameras, mics, and Wi-Fi--to open up a whole secondary layer of data collection and interface.

 

With cameras and mics, the MTA can enable two-way communication (what I imagine as emergency response messaging), and they can also pull in all sorts of automated metrics from their stations--they’d have eyes capable of counting station crowdedness or even approximate user ethnographics.

Meanwhile, Wi-Fi opens the door for networking a whole platform of mobile users with Internet access and other streamed content. Given that the average person waits 5 to 10 minutes on a platform, O’Donnell sees the potential of engaging, sponsored experiences, like a networked game of Jeopardy, while people wait for the train, or streaming media content, like TV/movie clips. A tourist could, of course, do something far more practical, too, like download a city map in moments.

“We can’t provide Internet for everybody,” he says, “but we can allow interactivity on the platform.”

david nguy's curator insight, October 21, 2014 5:53 PM

Sous la ville, de nouvelles technologies et innovations se mettent en place afin de faciliter la diffusion de l'information.

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European cities promote cycling with everything from ‘superhighways’ to revolving bike racks

European cities promote cycling with everything from ‘superhighways’ to revolving bike racks | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Cycling through the heart of some European cities can be a terrifying experience as you jostle for space with cars, trucks and scooters that whizz by with only inches to spare. Thankfully for bicycle enthusiasts, a movement is afoot to create more room for cycling in the urban infrastructure.

From London’s “cycle superhighways” to popular bike-sharing programs in Paris and Barcelona, growing numbers of European cities are embracing cycling as a safe, clean, healthy, inexpensive and even trendy way to get around town.

Amsterdam and Copenhagen are pioneers of this movement and serve as role models for other cities considering cycling’s potential to reduce congestion and pollution, while contributing to public health.

The trend is catching on also outside Europe, says John Pucher, a professor of urban planning at Rutgers University in New Jersey and co-author of a new book titled “City Cycling.”

Pucher says urban cycling is on the rise across the industrialized world, though Europe is still ahead of the pack.


Read the complete article for further details on urban cycling, cycle 'superhighways', bike sharing programs, two-wheel parking, mixed-mode commuting and more...


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El impacto del coche sin conductor en las ciudades

El impacto del coche sin conductor en las ciudades | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Reconozco que tiendo a rebajar las visiones más optimistas sobre la tecnología. “De todo lo que dicen, la mitad”. No soy buen prospectivista y tampoco tecno-determinista. Aún recuerdo una conversación con Diego Soroa hace unos meses en la que planteé que el tema del coche sin conductor me parecía una novedad aún demasiado emergente y que no veía su impacto en un futuro próximo. Sin embargo, creo que está más cerca de lo que inicialmente pensaba o, al menos, comienzo a pensar que sus dimensiones prácticas en relación al diseño de la infraestructura física asociada, a criterios de diseño interior que habrá de asumir la industria automovilística o a la redefinición de la movilidad urbana están entrando ya encima de la mesa. Estas son unas breves notas con dudas.


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Traffic Explained in Less Than 4 Minutes

Traffic Explained in Less Than 4 Minutes | Urban Life | Scoop.it
A video on what causes congestion, and how to fix it.

Via Carles Gascó
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Human Transit: paris: "the bus stop of the future"

Human Transit: paris: "the bus stop of the future" | Urban Life | Scoop.it
Now that Paris has bus lanes on almost every boulevard, we can expect their transit agencies to continue investing and innovating around their frequent and popular bus services.
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The meaning of two wheels and a motor in Paris

The meaning of two wheels and a motor in Paris | Urban Life | Scoop.it
It is glorious to walk the streets of Paris and revel in the colour, especially after hours in the cramped unbearable beigeness of an airplane. (Whatever happened to the use of the word steerage?) ...
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Why California Must Focus on Rail & Transit | Sustainable Cities Collective

Why California Must Focus on Rail & Transit | Sustainable Cities Collective | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Imagine a scenario by which our country’s most populous state, notorious for freeways, traffic nightmares and smog, could reduce driving by 3.7 trillion miles by 2050 (compared to trends forecast under business as usual), the equivalent of taking all cars off the state’s roads for 12 years. Imagine saving 140 billion gallons of gasoline through 2050, reducing oil consumption by an amount roughly equivalent to seven years’ worth of all US offshore oil production. Imagine saving some 3,700 square miles of California farmland, forests, recreation areas, and other currently open space that would otherwise be lost to sprawl. Imagine eliminating 140 premature deaths and 105,000 asthma attacks and respiratory symptoms each year.


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