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what to do to improve our lives in the city where we live
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MIT Center for Collective Intelligence

MIT Center for Collective Intelligence | Urban Life | Scoop.it
The MIT Center for Collective Intelligence brings together faculty from across MIT to conduct research on how new communications technologies are changing they way people work together.

Via Susan Bainbridge
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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 26, 2013 9:44 AM

 

Check it out, looks like WE will soon get more information...

 

Gust MEES's curator insight, May 26, 2013 9:47 AM

 

Check it out, looks like WE will soon get more information...


ANA's curator insight, February 18, 3:03 AM

Inteligencia colectiva

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NYC Subways Deploy A Touch-Screen Network, Complete With Apps

NYC Subways Deploy A Touch-Screen Network, Complete With Apps | Urban Life | Scoop.it

The designers at Control Group--have been hired by New York’s MTA to bring a plan for bringing a networked, touch-screen system to their subways. Starting this year, 90 touch-screen kiosks will make their way to thoroughfares like Grand Central Station and hip stops like Bedford Avenue. Together, they’ll make a beta network for 2 million commuters and tourists a day.


Each kiosk is a 47-inch touch screen, encapsulated in stainless steel, with an operational temperature up to 200 degrees. They’ll be placed, mostly in pairs, outside pay areas, inside mezzanines and even right on train platforms. Control Group has skinned the hardware with a simple front end and an analytics-heavy backend. And the platform will even support third-party apps approved by the MTA.

At launch, the screens will feature all sorts of content, like delays, outages, and, of course, ads (which bring in $100 million in revenue for the MTA each year, but mostly in paper signage). Yet its most powerful interaction for many will likely be its map, which features a one-tap navigation system.

You look at the map, you tap your intended destination, and the map will draw your route, including any transfers along the way. It’s an interface that puts Google Maps to shame.


Via Lauren Moss
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James's curator insight, March 21, 2013 3:15 AM

Touch interface has seen a rise in the community, such as information booths.

It allows for easy usability and quick access for people in a hurry.

While it does give convenience to the people, it's another job that's been mechanized because of its efficiency.

 

Touchscreens do away with the harder input devices and allow people to use it little to no prior knowledge of how to access it.

luiy's curator insight, March 21, 2013 7:23 AM

THE POWER OF EXTRA SENSORS

 

At the same time, the system’s screens could be the least interesting part of this project. The kiosks will be fitted with extra modules--video cameras, mics, and Wi-Fi--to open up a whole secondary layer of data collection and interface.

 

With cameras and mics, the MTA can enable two-way communication (what I imagine as emergency response messaging), and they can also pull in all sorts of automated metrics from their stations--they’d have eyes capable of counting station crowdedness or even approximate user ethnographics.

Meanwhile, Wi-Fi opens the door for networking a whole platform of mobile users with Internet access and other streamed content. Given that the average person waits 5 to 10 minutes on a platform, O’Donnell sees the potential of engaging, sponsored experiences, like a networked game of Jeopardy, while people wait for the train, or streaming media content, like TV/movie clips. A tourist could, of course, do something far more practical, too, like download a city map in moments.

“We can’t provide Internet for everybody,” he says, “but we can allow interactivity on the platform.”

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City living: There's an app for that 

In broadest terms, giving the population access to municipal data doesn't just generate apps, it changes the relationship between citizen and city. "It's greater than applications," said Jay Nath, chief innovation officer for the City of San Francisco. "For me, it's almost a new type of civic engagement."

 

That's the ethos that guides Code for America, which serves as a developer version of the Peace Corps for federal, state and local government. The nonprofit teams volunteer developers, known as fellows, with municipalities looking to create new apps and services with their data.

 

One signature Code for America app is Boston's Adopt a Hydrant program, which solved a persistent and dangerous city problem -- hydrants plowed in after snowstorms -- by pairing concerned citizens with individual hydrants to maintain. Honolulu uses the same model to deputize citizens to make sure the tsunami warning sirens near their homes have working batteries.

 

In total, Code for America has partnered with 11 American cities, developing and brainstorming apps similar to Boston's. "You can demonstrate to the large bureaucracy, 'This is what you get when you open up data,'" said Mark Headd, government affairs director for the organization

 

by Jason Slotkin

11 Jan 2013

 


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Three reasons why Copenhagen is the world leader in urban sustainability

Three reasons why Copenhagen is the world leader in urban sustainability | Urban Life | Scoop.it

"The buzz from Copenhagen is all about its new "superhighway" for bikes. The real secret to its pioneering urban design, though, is that it puts people first on all its streets."

 

this is cool!!! 


Via Laurence Serfaty, Wa Gon, David Hodgson, Anne Caspari
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The Automation of Rio: Smart City or Digital Tyranny? | Humanizing Technology | Big Think

The Automation of Rio: Smart City or Digital Tyranny? | Humanizing Technology | Big Think | Urban Life | Scoop.it
The Automation of Rio: Smart City or Digital Tyranny?

Via Manu Fernandez
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Technology and the Intelligence of Nature

Technology and the Intelligence of Nature | Urban Life | Scoop.it
Charles Eisenstein shares his concerns about how pervasive the 'technology will fix it' mentality has become, and proposes an entirely different approach to healing our current ecological and social crises.

Via Anne Caspari
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10 Most Impressive Smart Cities On Earth

10 Most Impressive Smart Cities On Earth | Urban Life | Scoop.it

It wasn’t too long ago that the term ‘Smart City’ was not on very many people’s radar screens, but recently, it has been more familiar, and people are understanding the concepts behind smart cities.


A smart city uses information combined with technology to improve quality of life, reduce environmental impact, and decrease energy demand. This list of the smartest cities on the planet takes those factors into consideration, as well as the ‘smart’ plans the city might have for the future...


Via Lauren Moss
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ComplexInsight's curator insight, February 12, 2013 9:26 AM

Great find from Peter Jasperse's blog and an inspirational read for those interested in building a smarter cities and environments since these cities have already started along the journey.

Jed Fisher's comment, February 16, 2013 1:54 AM
fantastic!
Jed Fisher's comment, February 16, 2013 1:54 AM
fantastic!
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Communities Aren't Just Places, They're Social Networks

Communities Aren't Just Places, They're Social Networks | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Cities are obviously more than just the sum of their physical assets — roads and bridges, offices, factories, shopping centers, and homes — working more like living organisms than jumbles of concrete. Their inner workings even transcend their ability to cluster and concentrate people and economic activity. As sociologist Zachary Neal of Michigan State University argues in his new book, The Connected City, cities are made up of human social networks.

 

Does the design of streets, for example, influence who our friends are?

 

What are the key factors that shape the networks of a connected city?

 

To what degree do influential people matter to the connected city? 


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De la ciudad de bits a las nuevas tecnologías urbanas

De la ciudad de bits a las nuevas tecnologías urbanas | Urban Life | Scoop.it
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Earth 2.0: Initialization

EARTH 2.0™ is an exciting and ambitious collaboration of innovative and far sighted developments in science and technology combined with the visualisation, imagery and stimulus achieved through the medium of film and interactive technologies to alter thinking and create a movement for change to deliver the sustainable world of the future. Earth 2.0: Initialization features Dr. Rachel Armstrong, Melissa Sterry, Niall Dunne and Tia Kansara, with a special appearance by international best-selling author Graham Hancock.

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