Urban Life
Follow
Find tag "placemaking"
10.4K views | +0 today
Urban Life
what to do to improve our lives in the city where we live
Curated by Jandira Feijó
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jandira Feijó
Scoop.it!

Street Closures and Urban Placemaking | Sustainable Cities Collective

Street Closures and Urban Placemaking | Sustainable Cities Collective | Urban Life | Scoop.it
Pedestrian-oriented shopping streets can be key to making communities more livable, particularly when they are well designed, managed and strategically connected to networks of public transit, pedestrian paths and bike routes.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from green streets
Scoop.it!

All Placemaking is Creative: How a Shared Focus on Place Builds Vibrant Destinations

All Placemaking is Creative: How a Shared Focus on Place Builds Vibrant Destinations | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Placemaking is a process, accessible to anyone, that allows peoples’ creativity to emerge. When open and inclusive, this process can be extraordinarily effective in making people feel attached to the places where they live. That makes people more likely to get involved and build shared wealth in their communities.


“Placemaking, applied correctly, can show us new ways to help cultures emerge where openness is not so scary,” notes Dr. Katherine Loflin, the lead project consultant for the Knight Foundation’s groundbreaking study, which showed a significant correlation between community attachment and economic growth. “We could find with consistency over time that it was the softer side of place—social offerings, openness, and aesthetics—that really seem to drive peoples’ attachment to their place. It wasn’t necessarily basic services: how well potholes got paved over. It wasn’t even necessarily for peoples’ personal economic circumstances.”

The study’s other key finding was that there is an empirical relationship between higher levels of attachment and cities’ GDP growth.

Placemaking, in other words, is a vital part of economic development. And yet, there has long been criticism that calls into question whether or not this process is actually helping communities to develop their local economies, or merely accelerating the process of gentrification in formerly-maligned urban core neighborhoods. We believe that this is largely due to confusion over what Placemaking is, and who “gets” to be involved. If Placemaking is project-led, development-led, design-led or artist-led, then it does likely lead to gentrification and a more limited set of community outcomes.

 

Read the complete article for more on the process of placemaking and the roles community members play in creating vibrant spaces...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Katharine Norman's curator insight, March 15, 2013 3:16 AM

Positive aspects from being connected to your community.

 

Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from green streets
Scoop.it!

What Makes a Great Public Destination?

What Makes a Great Public Destination? | Urban Life | Scoop.it

In a recent blog post, entrepreneur-turned-VC Mark Suster wrote about the necessary ingredients for a city trying o develop a successful start-up community. His advice seemed applicable to any community that’s trying to create a strong local sense of place, so we’ve retrofitted his recommendations to speak broadly to people who are working to transform their public spaces into magnetic destinations that are reflective of the diverse communities that surround them.


Stop by and read the complete article for details on the elements of great public spaces, including:

place capitaleventsaccess to advocateslocal press + organizational toolsplacemakersflagship public space
Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from green streets
Scoop.it!

Creating Great Streets: What Does it Take? (Project for Public Spaces)

Creating Great Streets: What Does it Take? (Project for Public Spaces) | Urban Life | Scoop.it

We recently chatted with experts John Massengale and Victor Dover about their soon-to-be-released book Street Design, which details the art and practice of creating great streets for people. In researching this book, John and Victor traveled across the world evaluating and experiencing different kinds of streets. John is an architect, urbanist, owner of Massengale & Co LLC, and Board Member at the Congress for New Urbanism. Victor Dover is a Fellow of the American Institute of Certified Planners, Principal in the firm Dover, Kohl & Partners Town Planning, and a Board Member and National Chair of the Congress for New Urbanism...

 

Click on the link for the complete interview.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from Le BONHEUR comme indice d'épanouissement social et économique.
Scoop.it!

Les marchés gratuits, la nouvelle tendance anticonso #OuiShare

Les marchés gratuits, la nouvelle tendance anticonso #OuiShare | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Né dans la capitale argentine, le concept fait fureur et a déjà conquis de nombreuses villes à travers tout le pays. L’idée est simple, il s’agit de donner le superflu sans rien attendre en retour, pour que plaisir d’offrir ne rime pas avec consommation effrénée.


Via Ludovic Plisson, Collporterre, association concert urbain
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from green streets
Scoop.it!

New Report: Livability and Placemaking for All Communities ...

New Report: Livability and Placemaking for All Communities ... | Urban Life | Scoop.it
I had the unique opportunity to participate in a “Smart Growth” bus tour of communities in North Carolina, organized last year by the Walkable and Livable Communities Institute and the Local Government Commission. We visited a variety of neighborhoods, from low-density to high, pre-car to newly developed, to learn how livable and sustainable principles can help a wide range of communities to adapt to meet the challenges of the 21st Century.

Important lessons can be learned from each of the communities we visited. None were perfect, but as Joel Garreau pointed out in Edge City: Life on the New Frontier, now-revered places like Venice and London were pieced together over centuries; flaws were frequently pointed out by critics, and fixed over time. Flaws in these places will be addressed over time as well. What is critical about each location is that they are testing out new ideas of what a sustainable future could look like. The neighborhoods that had the best sense of place were those that were created over a hundred years, and they serve as great models for how to take Traditional Neighborhood Development, Form Based Codes and other contemporary planning strategies to the next level...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from green streets
Scoop.it!

Opportunity is Local (or: You Can’t Buy a New Economy)

Opportunity is Local (or: You Can’t Buy a New Economy) | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Truly great places are not built from scratch to attract people from elsewhere; the best places have evolved into dynamic, multi-use destinations over time: years, decades, centuries. These places are reflective of the communities that surround them, not the other way around. Placemaking is, ultimately, more about the identification and development of local talent, not the attraction of talent from afar.

 

Places aren’t about the 21st century economy. They are about the people who inhabit and develop them. They are the physical manifestations of the social networks upon which our global economy is built. Likewise, Place-making is not about making existing places palatable to a certain class of people. It is a process by which each community can develop place capital by bringing people together to figure out what competitive edge their community might have and improve local economic prospects in-place.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Peter Jasperse's curator insight, February 6, 2013 1:16 AM

"If your strategy for improving local economic prospects is to drink some other city’s milkshake, you won’t get very far. It’s economic cannibalization. To really grow an economy, opportunity has to be developed organically within each community, and that requires that people dig in and improve their neighborhoods, together, for the sake of doing so–not convincing Google to open a new office down the road."

Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, February 6, 2013 4:20 AM

Trend: Opportunity is Local

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com

Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from URBANmedias
Scoop.it!

What Makes a SUCCESSFUL Place?

What Makes a SUCCESSFUL Place? | Urban Life | Scoop.it

When public spaces work well, they serve as a stage for our public lives. So what makes some succeed while others fail?

 

Great public spaces are where celebrations are held, social and economic exchanges take place, friends run into each other, and cultures mix. They are the “front porches” of our public institutions – libraries, field houses, neighborhood schools – where we interact with each other and government. 

In evaluating thousands of public spaces around the world, PPS has found that successful ones have four key qualities: they are accessible; people are engaged in activities there; the space is comfortable and has a good image; and finally, it is a sociable place: one where people meet each other and take people when they come to visit.

 

Read the complete article for a more detailed explanation of the diagram illustrating the elements that contribute to successful public spaces, as well as the qualitative and quantitative criteria to consider when evaluating any given location or site...


Via Lauren Moss, association concert urbain
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from green streets
Scoop.it!

7 Ways to Disrupt Your Public Space

7 Ways to Disrupt Your Public Space | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Last week, Fast Company posted a list, adapted from the book Smart Customers, Stupid Companies, of 7 Ways to Disrupt Your Industry. Reading through the list, we were struck by how applicable the recommendations that the authors put forth are to our own principles for good Placemaking.

But it makes sense, when you think about it: by directly involving communities in shaping their public spaces–leading with people, not design–Placemaking is in fact a highly disruptive approach.

Placemaking tosses out the idea that an architect or planner is more of an expert about how a place should be used than the people who are going to use it. By bringing people together around a shared physical place, it’s also a powerful tool for disrupting local complacency. Great public spaces give people a tangible way to connect with their neighborhoods, building a stronger local constituency–aka sense of community–over the long term.

With that in mind, we’ve taken Fast Company‘s list and tweaked it slightly to create a roster of 7 Ways to Disrupt Your Public Space for anyone who’s looking to use a local spot to build social capital in their neighborhood...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from green streets
Scoop.it!

Complete Streets: One Size Does Not Fit All « Project for Public Spaces

Complete Streets: One Size Does Not Fit All « Project for Public Spaces | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Last month Gary Toth spoke at the Complete Streets Forum in Toronto about the symbiotic relationship between the Complete Streets and Placemaking movements. Early on in the talk, posted above in full, Gary points out that a complete street makes travel “safe, comfortable, and convenient” for all modes–but that doesn’t necessarily mean that it overtly provides for each one in its own area. Complete streets can often include flexible or mixed-mode areas (Salt Lake City’s green lanes are a great example), but the focus should be on creating a street that is welcoming to everyone, no matter the mode of travel.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from Cities of the Future
Scoop.it!

Common Ground in a Liquid City: Essays in Defense of an Urban Future :: AK Press

Common Ground in a Liquid City: Essays in Defense of an Urban Future :: AK Press | Urban Life | Scoop.it

If we want to preserve what's still left of the natural world, we need to stop using so much of it. And cities are the best chance we have left for a sustainable future ... but only if they remain vibrant, dynamic spaces that are unfolded by millions of people working together—and not by master plans and planners. What will it take to make our cities truly sustainable?

 

In a world where the flow of money and jobs and people is largely determined by the whims of global capital, Matt Hern's Common Ground in a Liquid City is afreshingly down-to-earth look at the importance of place in the urban future.  


Via Anne Caspari, Mark Jagdev
more...
No comment yet.