Urban Life
Follow
Find tag "infrastructure"
10.4K views | +0 today
Urban Life
what to do to improve our lives in the city where we live
Curated by Jandira Feijó
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from green streets
Scoop.it!

NYC Subways Deploy A Touch-Screen Network, Complete With Apps

NYC Subways Deploy A Touch-Screen Network, Complete With Apps | Urban Life | Scoop.it

The designers at Control Group--have been hired by New York’s MTA to bring a plan for bringing a networked, touch-screen system to their subways. Starting this year, 90 touch-screen kiosks will make their way to thoroughfares like Grand Central Station and hip stops like Bedford Avenue. Together, they’ll make a beta network for 2 million commuters and tourists a day.


Each kiosk is a 47-inch touch screen, encapsulated in stainless steel, with an operational temperature up to 200 degrees. They’ll be placed, mostly in pairs, outside pay areas, inside mezzanines and even right on train platforms. Control Group has skinned the hardware with a simple front end and an analytics-heavy backend. And the platform will even support third-party apps approved by the MTA.

At launch, the screens will feature all sorts of content, like delays, outages, and, of course, ads (which bring in $100 million in revenue for the MTA each year, but mostly in paper signage). Yet its most powerful interaction for many will likely be its map, which features a one-tap navigation system.

You look at the map, you tap your intended destination, and the map will draw your route, including any transfers along the way. It’s an interface that puts Google Maps to shame.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
James's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:15 AM

Touch interface has seen a rise in the community, such as information booths.

It allows for easy usability and quick access for people in a hurry.

While it does give convenience to the people, it's another job that's been mechanized because of its efficiency.

 

Touchscreens do away with the harder input devices and allow people to use it little to no prior knowledge of how to access it.

luiy's curator insight, March 21, 2013 10:23 AM

THE POWER OF EXTRA SENSORS

 

At the same time, the system’s screens could be the least interesting part of this project. The kiosks will be fitted with extra modules--video cameras, mics, and Wi-Fi--to open up a whole secondary layer of data collection and interface.

 

With cameras and mics, the MTA can enable two-way communication (what I imagine as emergency response messaging), and they can also pull in all sorts of automated metrics from their stations--they’d have eyes capable of counting station crowdedness or even approximate user ethnographics.

Meanwhile, Wi-Fi opens the door for networking a whole platform of mobile users with Internet access and other streamed content. Given that the average person waits 5 to 10 minutes on a platform, O’Donnell sees the potential of engaging, sponsored experiences, like a networked game of Jeopardy, while people wait for the train, or streaming media content, like TV/movie clips. A tourist could, of course, do something far more practical, too, like download a city map in moments.

“We can’t provide Internet for everybody,” he says, “but we can allow interactivity on the platform.”

david nguy's curator insight, October 21, 2014 5:53 PM

Sous la ville, de nouvelles technologies et innovations se mettent en place afin de faciliter la diffusion de l'information.

Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from green streets
Scoop.it!

Change Your City: Top 10 Urban Transformation Projects

Change Your City: Top 10 Urban Transformation Projects | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Given the environmental straits we find ourselves in at present, architects and policy makers have to rethink our strategy of how to shape the city, buildings and urban space alike. This entails that we refrain from the strategies of the past and make do with the standing infrastructure that we already have.


Preserving and rehabilitating the aging steel relics of our global cities has proven an ingenious way of saving energy, while enabling newer methods of architectural planning. Projects such as the High Line have kickstarted a new age of urban regeneration–for good or bad–with initiatives from Tel Aviv to Philadelphia attempting to replicate it success on their own turf.

When it comes to urban transformation, size does not matter, per se. The subtleties of thoughtful urban projects shine through at every level, and sometime outperform their more ostentatious contemporaries.


Visit the link for photos and descriptions of 10 projects from across the globe, including public parks, infrastructure projects, cultural buildings and more...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from green streets
Scoop.it!

New York City Commits to Green Solution for Harnessing Water

New York City Commits to Green Solution for Harnessing Water | Urban Life | Scoop.it
With a landmark announcement this week, New York City has officially joined a growing number of cities around the country in embracing a smarter--and paradigm-shifting--approach to reducing water pollution. Using a suite of techniques like strategically located street plantings, porous pavements, and green roofs, collectively known as green infrastructure, New York is turning the problem of excess stormwater into a solution that will improve the health and livability of its neighborhoods, while cleaning up the waterways that course through and around the city.

It's hard to overstate what a dramatic shift in thinking this represents. Instead of viewing stormwater as waste, New York is turning it into a resource. With this move, New York is showing the rest of the country that if the largest city in the U.S. can finally tackle its chronic water pollution problems with green infrastructure--they can, too.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from green streets
Scoop.it!

European cities promote cycling with everything from ‘superhighways’ to revolving bike racks

European cities promote cycling with everything from ‘superhighways’ to revolving bike racks | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Cycling through the heart of some European cities can be a terrifying experience as you jostle for space with cars, trucks and scooters that whizz by with only inches to spare. Thankfully for bicycle enthusiasts, a movement is afoot to create more room for cycling in the urban infrastructure.

From London’s “cycle superhighways” to popular bike-sharing programs in Paris and Barcelona, growing numbers of European cities are embracing cycling as a safe, clean, healthy, inexpensive and even trendy way to get around town.

Amsterdam and Copenhagen are pioneers of this movement and serve as role models for other cities considering cycling’s potential to reduce congestion and pollution, while contributing to public health.

The trend is catching on also outside Europe, says John Pucher, a professor of urban planning at Rutgers University in New Jersey and co-author of a new book titled “City Cycling.”

Pucher says urban cycling is on the rise across the industrialized world, though Europe is still ahead of the pack.


Read the complete article for further details on urban cycling, cycle 'superhighways', bike sharing programs, two-wheel parking, mixed-mode commuting and more...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from green streets
Scoop.it!

A New Initiative will improve NYC's Stormwater Management Infrastructure

A New Initiative will improve NYC's Stormwater Management Infrastructure | Urban Life | Scoop.it

A new initiative will improve New York City's stormwater management infrastructure.

Stormwater generally is an unpleasant topic in New York City- during extreme weather events, it floods sewers, causing them to overflow.

These sewer overflows are the city’s biggest water quality problem and a major reason that waterways such as Gowanas, Newtown Creek, and Flushing Bay do not meet federal standards for swimming and marine wild life habitats.

However, under a bold new green infrastructure plan that includes $2.9 billion in new gray infrastructure and $2.4 billion in green infrastructure that won approval from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation in March, the city is hoping to capture much of its stormwater with green roofs and blue roofs as well as new types of plant beds and tree pits along its streets called bioswales...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.