Urban Life
10.5K views | +0 today
Follow
Urban Life
what to do to improve our lives in the city where we live
Curated by Jandira Feijó
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from Tech and urban life
Scoop.it!

Gwyneth Borden: How is technology impacting social and economic divisions in cities?

Gwyneth Borden: How is technology impacting social and economic divisions in cities? | Urban Life | Scoop.it
This post is a response to a group blogging event organized by Meeting of the Minds and Tumml.

Via Manu Fernandez
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from green streets
Scoop.it!

INTERVIEW: Rem Koolhaas on the Invention and Reinvention of the City

INTERVIEW: Rem Koolhaas on the Invention and Reinvention of the City | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Rem Koolhaas is a leading urban theorist and a Pritzker Prize–winning architect engaged in building projects around the world. He co-founded the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), which is receiving international attention for its recent completion of an enigmatic new headquarters for China Central Television (CCTV) in Beijing.

 

Here, Koolhaas discusses how the economic and cultural changes of the 21st century are transforming world cities as well as the practice of architecture.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from URBANmedias
Scoop.it!

Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands as one of the world's poorest mega-cities. This report comes from a GlobalPost series about the rise of mega-cities.


Via Seth Dixon, geofoodgraz, association concert urbain
more...
Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Downtowns: How Did We Get Here?

Kennedy Smith is considered one of the nation's leading experts on downtowns, downtown economics, independent business development and the economic impact of urban sprawl, with a long career in downtown revitalization.

 

This video discusses the decline of the American Central Business District, the rise of shopping malls, the importance of the automobile and spatial organization of particular economic sectors.

 

Parts Two  http://vimeo.com/37041011 ; and Three  http://vimeo.com/37050944 ; continue the discussion with an emphasis on practical urban planning policies for small cities to revitalize the downtown region with some domestic and foreign examples. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:38 AM

I have wondered about that where these downtowns came from. I have thought of it because I am very curious to learn about downtown providence and how it became a downtown. Where did the word downtown come from? It is amazing how things are being called in this world.

Rescooped by Jandira Feijó from green streets
Scoop.it!

Commuter biking could save US $17 billion a year | SmartPlanet

Commuter biking could save US $17 billion a year | SmartPlanet | Urban Life | Scoop.it
According to a new report on the public benefits of commuter biking, the practice can generate massive savings in health care.

The U.S. spends around $2 trillion a year on health care, according to the Council on Foreign Relations. Wouldn’t it be nice to find a way to cut back on those costs, while simultaneously improving public health and lowering carbon emissions?

Copenhagen recently published its 2012 Bicycle Account, which enumerates the considerable public benefits of commuter biking. One-third of the city’s population bikes to work, and this has benefited everything from transportation costs to security, tourism, traffic infrastructure, and public health...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.