Urban Life
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Urban Life
what to do to improve our lives in the city where we live
Curated by Jandira Feijó
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Urban Design for New American Cities

Urban Design for New American Cities | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Around many of our Gateway Cities like New York, Washington DC and San Francisco, are sprouting "New Cities", complete with their own infrastructure, neighborhoods, employment centers and cultural identity.


With exploding global populations, much of the talk around urbanization revolves around cities in Asia, Africa and Latin America. But here at home in the United States, a new type of city form is taking shape. Around many of our Gateway Cities like New York, Washington DC and San Francisco, are sprouting "New Cities", complete with their own infrastructure, neighborhoods, employment centers and cultural identity.

 

The timing of these "New Cities" is good, since in recent years there has been a resurgence of ideas of urban planning that promote mix of uses, walkability and transit oriented development. However, New Cities confront us with many unprecedented realities that we must consider and analyze in depth before we rubber-stamp our current formulas for creating vibrant urban communities. These places are inherently different from Gateway Cities, Suburban Settlements or Rural Areas. They have a DNA of their own, which requires a more tailored response...


Via Lauren Moss
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Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:00 PM

I believe this article is very interesting. It reminds us that because of changing times we also need to change the demographics of our cities. With exploding populations it is time to come up with a "New City' a different type of city with a new type of infrastructure. Around huge population centers these new cities are popping up and are creating a very different environment. These cities are creating permanent, affordable and very diverse places to live. They are creating a positive place for the people that move to these cities. A city of the future and for the future.

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10 Rules for Smarter Smart Growth in Existing Communities

10 Rules for Smarter Smart Growth in Existing Communities | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Many projects under the banners of smart growth or transit oriented development are simply high density or near transit corridors, or they include gratuitous green space and walking paths.  However, they fail in many of the finer points of smart growth, new urbanism, or transit oriented development.

 

According to Wikipedia, smart growth “advocates compact, transit-oriented, walkable, bicycle-friendly land use, including neighborhood schools, complete streets, and mixed-use development with a range of housing choices.”  The  ”rules” postulated here are meant to supplement rather than reiterate or replace existing Smart Growth or New Urbanism principles.  However, there is some overlap both with existing principles and with each other, as smart growth planning is an imperfect “science.”

These rules attempt to look at the finer points, beyond the density of a project or its proximity to transit corridors, so that in 50 years hindsight, smart growth will have a better record than so much of the planned development of the early post war years (including failed redevelopment projects, affordable housing projects, and suburban residential and commercial projects).


Via Lauren Moss
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Lauren Moss's curator insight, April 16, 2013 8:49 PM

A description of smart growth issues that goes a bit more in depth than the general characteristics typically cited...

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New Urban Ideas: 22 Cities Prepare to Pilot the Future

New Urban Ideas:  22 Cities Prepare to Pilot the Future | Urban Life | Scoop.it

22 cities have called for innovative solutions to solve urban challenges as part of the Citymart urban ideas competition. The aim is to identify & share solutions to challenges that cities face.


The 2012 competition attracted 1,519 entries from 70 countries. Now Aalborg, Barcelona, Boston, Christchurch, Eindhoven, Fukuoka DC, L’Hospitalet, Lagos, Lavasa, London, Maringa, Mexico City, Oulu, Paris, Rio de Janeiro, Rosario, San Francisco, Sant Cugat, Sheffield, Tacoma, Terrassa and York all hope to evoke a similar response.


The cities have presented challenges across a vast array of areas including mobility, economic development, social inclusion, health and well-being, urban management, lighting, energy, culture, future government and sustainable lifestyles...


Via Lauren Moss
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Cities: The Drivers of Sustainable Human Development and Prosperity

Cities: The Drivers of Sustainable Human Development and Prosperity | Urban Life | Scoop.it
While green buildings, by their most obvious definition, address environmental impacts, they also have wide implications for human health, safety and productivity. ... Green offices with day lit spaces boost employee productivity and attendance.
Via Ines Amaral
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Como ferramentas de mídias sociais dão voz ao desenvolvimento global | IJNet

Como ferramentas de mídias sociais dão voz ao desenvolvimento global | IJNet | Urban Life | Scoop.it
IJNet.org é o site do mundo para jornalistas e gerentes de mídia para saber mais sobre oportunidades de treinamento e networking. O site e os seus relatórios semanais de e-mail boletim sobre as últimas inovações, recursos e recompensas.
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Copenhagen X movie — new architecture and urban development

Copenhagen X movie — new architecture and urban development | Urban Life | Scoop.it
New ways to view and disseminate the city first seen on Scoop.it - Urban Life

Copenhagen X facilitates and disseminates information on architecture, urban development, building projects, archite...
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Robert Chambers on Development Practitioners

"I participate, you participate, he participates, we participate, you participate, they profit."

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Johan Rockstrom: Let the environment guide our development | Video on TED.com

Human growth has strained the Earth's resources, but as Johan Rockstrom reminds us, our advances also give us the science to recognize this and change behavior.

Via Anne Caspari
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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands as one of the world's poorest mega-cities. This report comes from a GlobalPost series about the rise of mega-cities.


Via Seth Dixon, geofoodgraz, association concert urbain
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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Ciudades a escala humana: Las ciudades como ámbito estratégico para el desarrollo tecnológico

Ciudades a escala humana: Las ciudades como ámbito estratégico para el desarrollo tecnológico | Urban Life | Scoop.it

Una de las vertientes más interesantes de la ola smart city es la relacionada con el impulso de entornos de cooperación tecnológica para el desarrollo de nuevas soluciones urbanas. Son varias las ciudades que han optado por promover nuevos programas de investigación de diferente signo relacionada con el futuro de las ciudades y las tecnologías urbanas, bien acogiendo centros o grupos de investigación en sus universidades, bien impulsando ellas mismas, normalmente siguiendo el interés de centros tecnológicos y grandes corporaciones, nuevos centros de investigación para la innovación urbana.


Via Manu Fernandez
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Take a Tour Around the Civic Center's Huge New Grand Park

Take a Tour Around the Civic Center's Huge New Grand Park | Urban Life | Scoop.it

The first two sections of LA's new Grand Park opened yesterday (with a very grand ribbon cutting) and already seem to be getting plenty of use from county workers and other green-starved locals. The park will be 12 acres when it's all done, and is the first and only component of the big Grand Avenue Project to be completed so far by megaproject's developer, Related Cos. (Incidentally, Related says it will break ground on the first residential part of the project sometime this year.) The Grand Park was designed by local architects Rios Clementi Hale, who put together a daring magenta and green color palette, native plantings, flowering trees, 24 gardens (based on the world's six Floristic Kingdoms: Boreal, Neotropical, Paleotropical, South African, Australian, Antarctic), and of course some good old-fashioned expanses of turf.

According to press materials, "Graphic inspiration came from a flattened map of the globe from the 1920s by J.P. Goode, an American cartographer."

The two blocks now open stretch between Grand Avenue and Hill Street and feature a newly-renovated Arthur J. Will Memorial Fountain, a new entry plaza stepping down from Grand to the fountain; a splash pad (open to the public for splashing!), a performance lawn and stage near Hill Street, a dog run, a courtyard lined in olive trees, Barbie pink moveable tables and chairs, and a low-slung building for offices, public restrooms, and a Starbucks. The next block down is set to open in August; the last block, by City Hall, should open in October...


Via Lauren Moss
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What Makes Some Cities Greener Than Others

What Makes Some Cities Greener Than Others | Urban Life | Scoop.it
Today I turn my attention to the economic, demographic, and other factors associated with cities and metros that have lower levels of carbon emissions.

 

Several Martin Prosperity Institute colleagues and I [Richard Florida] took a simple, straightforward statistical look at several things research and common sense suggest should be associated with higher and lower levels of carbon emissions.

We measure emissions three ways, as a function of population (per capita), workforce (per worker), and economic output (per economic output). All the caveats regarding correlation not being causation apply. However, our findings underscore the fact that carbon emissions are linked as much to the way we live as how we produce and manufacture things...


Via Flora Moon, Lauren Moss
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Designing Social Change

Designing Social Change | Urban Life | Scoop.it
The Designing Social Change series examines the rapidly-growing movement to apply design approaches to social problems.

There are currently one billion people living in informal settlements around the world. By the year 2030, that number is predicted to double. A movement under the umbrella of “socially-responsible design” has set out to prove that people living in settlements have as much right to live in well-designed cities as do the rest of us.


Via Lauren Moss
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