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URBAN EARTH

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of the largest urban areas on Earth. This video was shot by SUSO* and introduces t...

 

This is the introductory video to the Urban Earth youtube channel.  The goal of this "guerrilla geography" is to see and understand the city beyond the tourism guidebook.   Daniel Raven-Ellison, the creator of the project is one of National Geographic's "Emerging Explorers" and in this video, demonstrates the methods behind his urban explorations.  You can see his influence in helping found http://www.missionexplore.net/ as a portal for alternative geographies to engage students.  For more about his projects, see http://ravenellison.com/ for more details. 


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Designs to Fit More People in Every City

TED Talks How can we fit more people into cities without overcrowding? Kent Larson shows off folding cars, quick-change apartments and other innovations that could make the city of the future work a lot like a small village of the past.

 

This talk is relevant not just because it focuses on many urban issues; it also is a fantastic demonstration of how to use spatial thinking to solve problems.  

 

Tags:  density, urban, spatial, planning, TED. 


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Mike Carney's curator insight, September 30, 2013 5:41 PM

This TED Talk presents some very forward-thinking ideas on urban planning. With cities becoming more and more packed it is important to rethink the way we live and work in cities. Space saving technologies like the fold-up cars and small, changeable apartments seem futuristic but doable. This video challenges the viewer to think about the form and function of cities in new ways. Moving into the future it is important to adapt to the growing congestion in cities by applying new technologies with flexible designs that make cities more livable. I think that the smart apartments are an innovative solution but unlikely to catch on any time soon. I think that the folding cars are more likely to catch on because so many people already use the tiny smart cars and car-sharing services like zip-car are gaining in popularity. 

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 8:51 AM

This video is about how we can design a city that is less crowded. What Kent Larson thinks should happen to a city is basically minimize certain aspects of the city. What that means is adding these new ideas of folding cars,quick-change apartments and other innovations that will lessen the cities population and crowdedness. 

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Most common London surnames mapped

Most common London surnames mapped | Urban Issues | Scoop.it

James Cheshire, a geography lecturer at the University College London, mapped common surnames in London.


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The ReDistricting Game

The ReDistricting Game | Urban Issues | Scoop.it

This is an interactive way to teach the importance of the redistricting process.  Mapmakers (and geography) are crucial to the process.  This game shows students how the process can be manipulated and if you understand local demographics and voting patterns, subtle shifts in the district borders can swing elections.  This is a great way to teaching gerrymandering and how political cartography can be.     


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Régine Ballonad-Berthois's curator insight, February 23, 9:02 AM

J'ai regardé la vidéo de présentation et j'ai eu envie de jouer à ce jeu ! J'ai aimé le graphisme, la musique et la voix du narrateur. J'ai eu envie de continuer et je pense que mes élèves auraient eu également envie d'aller plus loin. Il ne me reste donc plus qu'à le tester !

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URBAN EARTH

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of the largest urban areas on Earth. This video was shot by SUSO* and introduces t...

 

This is the introductory video to the Urban Earth youtube channel.  The goal of this "guerrilla geography" is to see and understand the city beyond the tourism guidebook.   Daniel Raven-Ellison, the creator of the project is one of National Geographic's "Emerging Explorers" and in this video, demonstrates the methods behind his urban explorations.  You can see his influence in helping found http://www.missionexplore.net/ as a portal for alternative geographies to engage students.  For more about his projects, see http://ravenellison.com/ for more details. 


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Africa for Norway

Africa for Norway | Urban Issues | Scoop.it

This website is an incredibly humorous parody of Eurocentric charitable organizations that, while well-intentioned, propogate many negative stereotypes about Africa. 

    

Questions to Ponder: What do you think the 'point' of Radi-Aid is?  Do you agree with their point?  How does the media influence our idea of places?   

 

Tags: Africa, development, NGOs, Norway.


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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 8, 2013 10:12 AM

When I saw this video in class I was confused at first.  I now understand it to be a parody that pokes fun at Eurocentric charities that have good intentions but often undermine places such as Africa.  Yes, Africa faces poverty and there are many charities to help support African countries, but the leaders of these charities must realize that Africa cannot exclusively be based on this one idea of poverty.  I agree with the point of "Radi-Aid", that the African story is much more positive than what the Eurocentric world makes of it.  Media always has the ability to influence our ideas about places.  We see one commerical about a charitable organization trying to help Africa and the first thing we think of is how impoverished Africans are.  Media exposes us to so many stereotypes which may not all be untrue, but incomplete.

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Mapping American Stereotypes

Mapping American Stereotypes | Urban Issues | Scoop.it

There are plenty of regional biases about other places.  This map was generated by Google autocomplete.  If you Google, "Why is Rhode Island so...." if will automatically suggest some responses.  This was done for all the states and these autoresponses are quite revealing (and often humorous). 


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 2, 2012 9:59 PM
I find it funny that from state to state the same adjectives are being used over and over again. For example: "so boring," "so humid," and "so liberal." As much as there are stereotypes for each region, we share the same qualities as a union, for the most part.
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The business of US food aid – interactive

The business of US food aid – interactive | Urban Issues | Scoop.it
Nearly $1bn was spent last year buying wheat, sorghum and other products for the controversial US 'in-kind' food aid programmes.   Over 40 companies sold food aid last year

But big agribusinesses are not the only ones winning US food aid contracts. Over 40 companies sold nearly 1.8m tonnes, or $1bn worth, of food aid last year.

Some have developed entirely new product lines, specifically to sell as overseas food aid. Others have fought to get their products on the list of eligible commodities, which includes items such as canned pink salmon and dehydrated potato flakes.

Didion, a private, family-owned company headquartered in Wisconsin, has developed a special line of corn-based food aid products. Last year it was the government’s top supplier of corn-soy blend, a fortified food of choice for the UN’s World Food Programme.  What Crops are being donated?  To which countries?  From which companies?  The answers lie in this interactive feature.


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Lives on the Line

Lives on the Line | Urban Issues | Scoop.it

As mentioned by the cartographers of this London map, maps have a way of highlighting the social inequalities especially at the neighborhood scale in the urban environment.  Each ward (census tract is colored according to child poverty rates, and the numbers represent life expectany rates in the neighborhood near each underground stop. 


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