IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE
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Life expectancy and infant mortality: how does Mexico compare to other countries? » Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico

Life expectancy and infant mortality: how does Mexico compare to other countries? » Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico | Geo-Mexico, the geography of Mexico | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
How long do Mexicans live? The 20th century brought dramatic increases in longevity. From under 30 years at the beginning of the century it rose to 38 by 1930.

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IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE
Articles about changing urban geography
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Breathe less … or ban cars: cities have radically different responses to pollution

Breathe less … or ban cars: cities have radically different responses to pollution | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
When thick smog recently hit, Londoners were advised to avoid exercise, while Parisians got free public transport. Which is the best solution?

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With No Help From DC, US Cities Fund Transit Their Own Selves

With No Help From DC, US Cities Fund Transit Their Own Selves | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
"There is no cavalry coming."
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Urban world: Meeting the demographic challenge in cities | McKinsey & Company

Urban world: Meeting the demographic challenge in cities | McKinsey & Company | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The days of easy growth in the world’s cities are over, and how they respond to demographic shifts will influence their prosperity.
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an interesting alternative view
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Urban India and its female demographic dividend

Urban India and its female demographic dividend | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Read more about Urban India and its female demographic dividend on Business Standard. India's urban female work-force participation rate is growing 5.6% annually since 1991, in comparison with 2% for rural females and 3% for urban males
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Which is the world’s most wasteful city?

Which is the world’s most wasteful city? | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Mumbai produces 11,000 tonnes of trash per day, Cairo feeds garbage to pigs and China’s waste is growing twice as fast as its population – but it’s the wealthiest cities that throw the most away
Alexandra Piggott's insight:
Some surprising ideas here alongside the incentive based schemes for recycling that operate in some cities eg: swapping recycling for food
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What the experts say: how to make our cities more sustainable

What the experts say: how to make our cities more sustainable | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Catch-up on the highlights from our recent panel discussion on sustainable cities, including why it is a myth that Spaniards don’t cycle

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The 9 Worst-Designed Cities in the World

The 9 Worst-Designed Cities in the World | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"To get to the bottom of what qualifies as 'badly designed,' we picked the brains of several urban planners to highlight the flaws of some of the world's biggest cities. In the end, that birthed a list of nine cities that, for various reasons, are gigantic messes in some way or another."

 

On the list: Jakarta, Dubai, Atlanta, Naypyidaw, São Paulo, Boston, Brasilia, Missoula and Dhaka. 

 

Tags: urban, planning, urbanism.


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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 5:46 AM

Reading about these different cities makes me cringe. Either the rich is priority, politicians are priority, or traffic is insane to the point going to the grocery store for milk will cost you two hours in traffic.

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:12 AM

Reflection of development. Sometimes commercialization in less developed or developing countries causes issues due to lack of finances when trying to industrialize the region. This poses problems such as the ones described in the article. 

christian's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:01 PM

Unit 6: urban land use 

This article is mainly about how bad some of the worlds urban areas are. The article shows and explains why they are bad and also why they were even designed in the way that they were. One example is Brasilia, which, was designed to have a population of 500,000, instead it has a population of about 3 million.

This article ties into unit 6 by showing some of the worst urban areas throughout the world. And also why they were even designed to be a CBD.

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Comparing four world cities – London, Delhi, Tokyo and Bogota

Comparing four world cities – London, Delhi, Tokyo and Bogota | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
These four cities - home to a total of more than 80 million people - respond to economic, political and environmental shifts in radically different ways. LSE Cities crunches the data on growth, transport and density

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oyndrila's curator insight, February 12, 2015 11:54 AM

An excellent resource to discuss urban environments.

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Could this favela be the blueprint for how our cities should look by 2050?

Could this favela be the blueprint for how our cities should look by 2050? | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Mediaeval towns and Brazilian favelas could hold the secrets to better urban living and should be studied by architects and planners designing Britain’s new green cities, according to a leading environmental scientist.

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Residents of informal settlements of Ulaanbataar are reluctant to move to formal housing.

Residents of informal settlements of Ulaanbataar are reluctant to move to formal housing. | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Though Ulaanbaatar’s sprawling informal ‘ger district’ lacks access to drinking water and sewerage, officials may struggle to coax residents to swap canvas for bricks and mortar

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Alexandra Piggott's insight:

A great case study of the impact of globalisation and the drive to development alongside traditional cultural norms.

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oyndrila's curator insight, September 3, 2014 10:44 AM

An interesting article that examines the struggle between tradition and modernity among rural-urban migrants of Mongolia.

CT Blake's curator insight, September 7, 2014 5:19 PM

Yurts!!!

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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


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Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 2014 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

Casey Lysdale's curator insight, November 28, 2016 12:43 PM
Could subsistence in megacities becoming a bigger threat than sea level rise? The population rise caused an increase in groundwater extraction practices which made the ground sink over six feet in Indonesia's largest city. The solution is to stop pumping groundwater and seek alternative forms of obtaining drinking water. Effects of land subsistence combined with rising sea levels can leave many coastal cities into project Atlantis. 
 
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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 2014 12:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 2014 9:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:47 PM

APHG-U6

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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."


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steve smith's curator insight, June 7, 2014 9:01 PM

A great look at urbanisation. 

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 2014 9:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

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Daily chart: The world’s most liveable cities | The Economist

Daily chart: The world’s most liveable cities | The Economist | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
COMING up with a list of the world’s best cities is a near-impossible task. The bustle and hum of megacities like São Paulo or Tokyo might be too much for some people; others might struggle with the pace of life in Cleveland or Frankfurt.
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This is mankind's 'great urbanisation' era. We must act now, or the planet will pay

This is mankind's 'great urbanisation' era. We must act now, or the planet will pay | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The world will never again build cities as rapidly as it does this century. If we are serious about limiting global warming, tackling air pollution and promoting innovative, resource-efficient growth, there is a narrow window of opportunity

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the perils and advantages of rapid uncontrolled urbanisation
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Shrinking cities: the rise and fall of global urban populations – mapped

Shrinking cities: the rise and fall of global urban populations – mapped | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The world is experiencing rapid urbanisation, but not every city is growing. Population is likely to decline in 17% of large cities in developed regions and 8% of cities across the world from 2015 to 2025, according to a McKinsey report
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A planet of suburbs

A planet of suburbs | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The Economist offers authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
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Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities

Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Beginning in the 1950s, cities demolished thousands of homes in walkable neighborhoods to make room for freeways.

 

At the time, this was seen as a sign of progress. Not only did planners hope to help people get downtown more quickly, they saw many of the neighborhoods being torn down as blighted and in need of urban renewal.  But tearing down a struggling neighborhood rarely made problems like crime and overcrowding go away. To the contrary, displaced people would move to other neighborhoods, often exacerbating overcrowding problems. Crime rates rose, not fell, in the years after these projects.  By cutting urban neighborhoods in half, planners undermined the blocks on either side of the freeway. The freeways made nearby neighborhoods less walkable. Reduced foot traffic made them less attractive places for stores and restaurants. And that, in turn, made them even less walkable. Those with the means to do so moved to the suburbs, accelerating the neighborhoods' decline.


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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:34 AM

Urbanization - transportation

 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:16 AM

Industrialization changed not only the physical face of cities, but also the social. Innovations such as highways have caused transportation to become widely easier, allowing people from all different regions of the city to travel easily back and forth from place to place. 

Jill Wallace's curator insight, May 30, 2015 9:41 PM

Maps, Urbanization

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Ten quirky ideas for making our cities more sustainable

Ten quirky ideas for making our cities more sustainable | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
From glow in the dark trees to underground bike sheds and solar powered bins we look at some of the more left-field solutions to help make our cities more liveable

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The Cost of Sprawl: A Visual Comparison

The Cost of Sprawl: A Visual Comparison | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

The cost of sprawl is 2.5 times more expensive than the compact city.

Sidewalks, water and wastewater pipes, schools and libraries, police and fire protection, and of course, roads. And whether the costs are paid by the homeowner, the local government, or businesses, the lower density in the suburbs leads to higher costs to operate, maintain and replace all these services...


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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, March 10, 2015 10:12 AM

     Sprawl is the spread of development over the landscape. For suburban areas it's going to be more expensive than urban areas. Sprawl in suburban areas would overall take more time in making it more as an urban area. Making urban areas more industrial is going to be a lot easier especially since the area has already been industrialized. 

I.C.

Eben Lenderking's curator insight, March 11, 2015 8:22 AM

Pile 'em high

Suzette Jackson's curator insight, May 24, 2015 2:04 AM

The cost of sprawl is 2.5 times more expensive than the compact city.

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The best idea to redevelop Dharavi slum? Scrap the plans and start again

The best idea to redevelop Dharavi slum? Scrap the plans and start again | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Dharavi stands on a goldmine: a slice of prime land in the heart of India’s richest city. Sharkish developers are circling, but a new competition to invite better ways forward has thrown up fascinating proposals
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China Is Building A Huge Eco-City Where No One Will Need To Drive

China Is Building A Huge Eco-City Where No One Will Need To Drive | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

Outside Chengdu, in central China, a 78 million square foot site has been determined for an unconventional sort of construction project. It will be a city built from scratch, for 80,000 people, none of whom will need a car to get around.The "Great City" is a plan for an ambitious urban center designed to limit its residents environmental impact by producing clean energy, reducing waste, and promoting public transportation over individual car use.





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What about Dongtan - have we been here before?

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First taste of chocolate

"To be honest I do not know what they make of my beans," says farmer N'Da Alphonse. "I've heard they're used as flavoring in cooking, but I've never seen it. I do not even know if it's true." Watch how the Dutch respond to a cocoa bean in return or you can watch our entire episode on chocolate here.


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Alexandra Piggott's insight:

 This video is really amazing - we tend to forget the delight that comes from experiencing something new. Although chocloate production does have a dark side this video offers a different perspective.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 6:02 PM

this is an interesting demonstration of the disconnect between the consumer and the producer. we would consider chocolate to be the product these guys are producing, yet we forget that they only deal with it at the rawest level. something we see everyday is something as rare as gold to these guys.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:12 PM

how do these people not know what the crop they are producing is or tastes like? that is amazing to me how you can be so oblivious to what you are doing. and how the place that produces cocoa does not actually have access to it.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:15 AM

What is the geography of chocolate like?  This video was produced in the Netherlands, the global center of the cocoa trade, but the world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire.  There is a dark side to chocolate production; the dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.  Although the worst of the situation is glossed over in this video, it still hints at the vast economic inequalities that are part and parcel of the global chocolate trade and the plantation roots of the production.  What are some of your reactions to this video?  


Tags: chocolate, Ivory Coast, Africa, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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An Intriguingly Detailed Animation of How People Move Around a City

An Intriguingly Detailed Animation of How People Move Around a City | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Watch the commuting patterns of New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles.

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Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 2014 5:49 AM

possibly useful for studying complexity

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, July 13, 2014 6:28 PM
Another fabulous post for Year 7 via Seth Dixon. An aspect of liveability in colour!
MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:03 PM

APHG-U7

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▶ India's urban future - YouTube

Our Live Charts offer food for thought on topics from military spending to millennials to football
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