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Mo Ibrahim: Africa's youth are either a blessing or a curse – video

Billionaire philanthropist Mo Ibrahim explains why Africa faces particular challenges to provide school places, training and jobs for its young people...

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Articles about changing urban geography
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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

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Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, June 26, 5:25 PM

Just a few years ago there were only  20 cities with a pop over 10 million.  I'll use this with my  10 geography class to compare Australia's population and size with these cities and  look at debates around policies.  I,ll try and get the students to debate around ecological sustainability.

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 12:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 9:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."


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steve smith's curator insight, June 7, 9:01 PM

A great look at urbanisation. 

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 9:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 7:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Tony Hall's curator insight, March 6, 6:38 AM

Wow. This is amazing. The cynical side of me wonders what the costs have been for the people of the area. Not to mention the environmental costs.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


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Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 10:23 PM

Unit VII

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 10:40 AM

unit 7

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 6:48 PM

The majority of megacities are in the developing world, with the exception of places like New York and Tokyo, best showing how the face of the world is changing. Developing countries are on their paths to becoming major powers, such as Calkutta for example. As an enlarging city, more and more citizens are flocking to the abundance of jobs in the city which thus increases India's development as a result of the growing city and thus leads to a cycle of growth as demand for more jobs increases as the city grows. Megacities are thus a symbol of the developing world and can be used in human geography as symbols of development. 

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Population concentration growing in Tokyo region: report

Population concentration growing in Tokyo region: report | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The number of people who moved into the Tokyo metropolitan region exceeded the number moving out by 96,524 in 2013, up more than 29,000 from the previous year, a government ...

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The 10 Cities That Are Leading The Way In Urban Sustainability

The 10 Cities That Are Leading The Way In Urban Sustainability | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Cities are the laboratories where the most innovative ideas for surviving in the future can be tested. These 10--from New York to Tokyo to Bogota...

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oyndrila's curator insight, September 8, 2013 5:41 AM

Inspiring information on innovative techniques implemented by cities around the world to be sustainable.The cities featured here belong to the developing and the developed world. So, more cities in the developing world must work towards being sustainable.

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Why Bus Rapid Transit Is Particularly Good for Developing Countries

Why Bus Rapid Transit Is Particularly Good for Developing Countries | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
In places like Istanbul and Mexico City, BRT is cleaning the air and saving commute time.

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How Cities Can Address the Critical Need for Sustainable Development

How Cities Can Address the Critical Need for Sustainable Development | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Innovations for renewable energy and community planning for smart growth ensure the viability of cities for years to come.

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oyndrila's curator insight, January 19, 4:13 AM

Some generalised characteristics of a sustainable city. The article also includes some interesting examples of sustainable projects.

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Sustainable Public Transportation initiative in Ahmedabad, India

The Janmarg is already a source of pride for the residents of Ahmedabad in Gujarat, and for good reason!

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oyndrila's curator insight, January 13, 4:19 AM

Such initiatives are essential to bring about sustainable urbanisation in parts of the world where urbanisation is increasing rapidly.

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Urban Exploration

Urban Exploration | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"The French have a wonderful word—flâneur—for someone who seeks to explore and understand the nature of a city’s landscape, usually by taking spontaneous adventures amidst the ebb and flow of life going on around them. In this week’s theme we invite you to lose yourself reading about the flâneur-esque adventures of Maptia’s streetwise connoisseurs and explore a myriad of cities through their eyes."


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Linda Alexander's curator insight, December 1, 2013 11:04 AM

A wonderful site that currently explores 21 global cities.  If you've ever traveled to India (any major city within it), Mexico City, Rome, or any another travel destination where the human street population is somewhat off the charts, you'll enjoy these blog posts.  Meanwhile, I am thinking about entering a post of my own!  This is a perfect site to share with students prior to journal writing or school trips abroad. 

Helen Rowling's curator insight, December 1, 2013 8:18 PM

Gr8 immersion of stories of lives in other countries.

Tony Gough's curator insight, December 9, 2013 6:09 AM

Travel the world and read the short stories to learn more!

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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 11, 2013 1:12 PM

The mega city revlution has started and accroing to stastics its only to get more popular. The creattion of these mega cities has trasformed where people want to live, while also helping to bring nations stability though creation on these mega cities. It was said that with in 30 years more than 60% of the population will live in cities. Theses megacities are desirable, they help to stablize a country and have almost doubbled in number since the 1990's. It will be intereesting to see how the effects of megacites play out on the eniorment and ecnomny in the futre though.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 4:52 AM

Cities are attractive places to live. They host local entertainment, culture and are very lively.But with the increasing number of city dewellers in years to come i can see people easily forgetting their roots. This can also become a massive enviromental problems if citys start to expolde in numbers but the cities resources remain stagnet. Imagine a city like LA doubling in numbers the water supply in surrounding areas would be erraticacted.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:23 PM

Urbanization is the now. It is the up and coming world. That statistic is easily going to be correct in 2030. None the less, the world is conforming to its popular places. Where do you go when you need to shop, or to have a meeting? The city of course. Cities will take over the world and one day, no one will live in rural areas because there might not be any to even live in.

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Are We Headed For ‘The End Of The Suburbs’?

Are We Headed For ‘The End Of The Suburbs’? | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The next generation of home buyers is abandoning the suburbs and living in the city. Leigh Gallagher, author of the new book "The End of the Suburbs," explains her research.

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Dennis V Thomas's curator insight, November 8, 2013 3:25 PM

Thank Goodness!!!

 

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Here's Where You're Most Likely to Die From Air Pollution

Here's Where You're Most Likely to Die From Air Pollution | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
A new NASA map of the planet lays out the depressing geographies of smog and premature death.
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▶ India's urban future - YouTube

Our Live Charts offer food for thought on topics from military spending to millennials to football
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The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.

 

By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.


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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, March 25, 6:42 PM

Pointed out in the latest report on Construction Industry 

Trends by Accenture, the rise of the Megacities will empower construction whilst raising many environmental and health problems.

Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 4:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 5:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

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Quotes on Urban environments


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oyndrila's curator insight, March 13, 11:53 AM

I found this collection of quotes meaningful to introduce as well as reflect on topics on urban environments.

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The Case for Cul-de-Sacs

The Case for Cul-de-Sacs | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
People who live in them actually have greater social cohesion, according to one sociologist.

 

Thomas R. Hochschild Jr. actually first encountered the social cohesion of cul-de-sacs in his latest research when he wandered into one in Connecticut with his clipboard and polo shirt, and someone called the cops.  That never happened on the other types of streets he was studying, places where it would turn out the neighbors didn't know each other as well, and it was less clear who "belonged." Repeatedly, though, he found at the end of cul-de-sacs families who watched each others' children and took in each others' mail, who barbequed and orchestrated the removal of snow together, and who considered each other close friends. In cul-de-sacs, these families had a stronger sense of shared social space and territoriality. An outsider stood out.


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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 23, 8:33 PM

Living in a cul-de-sac sounds very inviting.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 24, 1:32 PM

I lived in a col-de-sac for a number of years. My family and I had very close relationships with our two neighbors within our col-de-sac. We had parties together and helped each other out in times of need - this article is spot on.  

Matt Richardson's curator insight, February 25, 10:13 AM

Interesting article about suburban design.

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The London Array

The London Array | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

Twenty kilometers (12 miles) from England’s Kent and Essex coasts, the world’s largest offshore wind farm has started harvesting the breezes over the sea. Located in the Thames Estuary, where the River Thames meets the North Sea, the London Array has a maximum generating power of 630 megawatts (MW), enough to supply as many as 500,000 homes.

The wind farm became fully operational on April 8, 2013. Twenty days later, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite captured this image of the area. The second image is a closeup of the area marked by the white box in the top image. White points in the second image are the wind turbines; a few boat wakes are also visible. The sea is discolored by light tan sediment—spring runoff washed out by the Thames.


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Albert Jordan's curator insight, January 29, 8:16 PM

England is in a peculiar situation due to their geographic location limiting their ability to expand outward and collect homegrown resources. As the first world nations push towards a “greener” and more sustainable energy producing ability, the effects of trying to help the Earth, both positive and negative need to be taken into effect. As some opponents to the wind farm have brought up, it can negatively affect the bird species in the area. What matters most? England’s attempt to wean themselves off of unsustainable resource dependence in order to enhance the future generations may be seen as a positive but with every action, there is a reaction.

 The issue that comes up as we humans try to better our relationship with the Earth in an effort not to destroy our home, paired with our lust for a healthy and non-apocalyptic future that we can still absorb ourselves into social media – do we negatively impact local animal species for our greater cause or do we limit our footprint even if it takes a viable option for the enhancement of our own resource dependence off the table. I guess if the long term effect on the birds and the resulting issues of their no longer presence was fully and responsibly researched and the pros and cons were compared to each other, then time will tell if the wind farm does more harm or good.

Shiva Prakash's curator insight, February 3, 11:21 PM

Technology is changing the shopping habits of buyers. Compete recently conducted a survey that reported a rapid increase in the number of people using their mobile devices for shopping Online shopping which u can buy from home easily with lots of designs of cloths and new technology mobile phones without going out for shopping just click here to go eaZy http://shopdeer.blogspot.in/

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 3:08 PM

It is very nice to see alternative forms of energy being explored. The conscious effort to cut carbon emissions is a benefit for the entire planet.

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The Circular Economy

Ellen takes us on a journey to investigates how insights from living systems might offer some of the answers to how we can re-design our future, in a world of increasing finite materials and energy.

Find out more about the circular economy at  http://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org

Follow the Ellen MacArthur Foundation on Twitter:  http://www.twitter.com/made2bmadeagain


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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, November 13, 2013 6:06 PM

The focus here is on 100% recycling. Because it is not enough to merely use a little less and cause a little less harm.  We need to close the loop by elimimating what we call "waste" and reducing our harm all the way down to 0.

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Beijing's mayor announces 'all-out effort' to tackle air pollution

Beijing's mayor announces 'all-out effort' to tackle air pollution | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Jennifer Duggan: A number of Chinese cities again hit by record high levels of air pollution as residents are advised to stay indoors

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How to Design a Happier City

How to Design a Happier City | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Charles Montgomery's new book finds the intersection of urban policy and well-being.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 13, 2013 5:04 AM

Strategies for future urban planning 

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Is a Favela Still a Favela Once It Starts Gentrifying?

Is a Favela Still a Favela Once It Starts Gentrifying? | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Rents are going up in Rio's informal housing communities. What, if anything, should the city do about it?

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Hotter Summers Mean More Health Risks In Urban Heat Islands · EarthFix · KCTS 9

Hotter Summers Mean More Health Risks In Urban Heat Islands · EarthFix · KCTS 9 | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

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Anita Woodruff's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:09 PM

cooling urban heat islands in the age of global warming

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How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines

How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Volunteers across the world are building the digital infrastructure for the organization's Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 12, 2013 2:28 PM

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  Can you join in and help?


Tags: disasters, mappingPhilippines, STEM.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 13, 2013 3:32 PM

online maps are being used to help locate the best way possible to help transport food and resources to those most in need. They van locate bridges and the world is pulling together with tehcnolgy and accurate maps to help the  American red Cross maximize in time and manpower. It seems that after Hurricane Katrina and the Earthquakes in Haiti and Japan, We have been improving our strategies for how to best help people around the globe come together put our time energy and resources together to best help people whose lives have been devasted and crushed by the forces of mother nature.

 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 7:14 PM

Having a map of the current landscape, after the typhoon will speed up relief and rescue efforts by showing areas to land and set up help stations. The digital world is immediate now and this will change how organizations such as the Red Cross provide relief to suffering people.

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Urban agriculture in Brazil’s favelas

Urban agriculture in Brazil’s favelas | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"Established in 2004 by local social entrepreneur Hans Dieter Temp, an organisation called Cidades sem Fome (Cities Without Hunger) is working to reduce hunger and joblessness among some of the most economically deprived areas of Sao Paulo, through urban agriculture.
Local community members are given the tools and training to start producing fruit and vegetables on unused land acquired by the organisation. This not only brings much needed quality produce and food security to the community, but it is also addressing the issue of unemployment – a constant problem in Brazil’s favelas."

 

A wonderful project that is not only dealing with malnutrition and unemployment but is contributing to people's sense of importance, which is invaluable.

 

A shining example that shows that the way forward is through people working together.


Via Dawn Lester, Sepp Hasslberger, Pat Brenner
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