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How the Experts Would Fix Cities

How the Experts Would Fix Cities | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
More than 50 percent of the world's population now lives in urban areas.
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Articles about changing urban geography
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Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities

Before-and-after maps show how freeways transformed America's cities | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Beginning in the 1950s, cities demolished thousands of homes in walkable neighborhoods to make room for freeways.

 

At the time, this was seen as a sign of progress. Not only did planners hope to help people get downtown more quickly, they saw many of the neighborhoods being torn down as blighted and in need of urban renewal.  But tearing down a struggling neighborhood rarely made problems like crime and overcrowding go away. To the contrary, displaced people would move to other neighborhoods, often exacerbating overcrowding problems. Crime rates rose, not fell, in the years after these projects.  By cutting urban neighborhoods in half, planners undermined the blocks on either side of the freeway. The freeways made nearby neighborhoods less walkable. Reduced foot traffic made them less attractive places for stores and restaurants. And that, in turn, made them even less walkable. Those with the means to do so moved to the suburbs, accelerating the neighborhoods' decline.


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MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 9:34 AM

Urbanization - transportation

 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 10:16 AM

Industrialization changed not only the physical face of cities, but also the social. Innovations such as highways have caused transportation to become widely easier, allowing people from all different regions of the city to travel easily back and forth from place to place. 

Jill Wallace's curator insight, May 30, 9:41 PM

Maps, Urbanization

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Ten quirky ideas for making our cities more sustainable

Ten quirky ideas for making our cities more sustainable | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
From glow in the dark trees to underground bike sheds and solar powered bins we look at some of the more left-field solutions to help make our cities more liveable

Via Andy Dorn
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The Cost of Sprawl: A Visual Comparison

The Cost of Sprawl: A Visual Comparison | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

The cost of sprawl is 2.5 times more expensive than the compact city.

Sidewalks, water and wastewater pipes, schools and libraries, police and fire protection, and of course, roads. And whether the costs are paid by the homeowner, the local government, or businesses, the lower density in the suburbs leads to higher costs to operate, maintain and replace all these services...


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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, March 10, 10:12 AM

     Sprawl is the spread of development over the landscape. For suburban areas it's going to be more expensive than urban areas. Sprawl in suburban areas would overall take more time in making it more as an urban area. Making urban areas more industrial is going to be a lot easier especially since the area has already been industrialized. 

I.C.

Eben Lenderking's curator insight, March 11, 8:22 AM

Pile 'em high

Suzette Jackson's curator insight, May 24, 2:04 AM

The cost of sprawl is 2.5 times more expensive than the compact city.

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The best idea to redevelop Dharavi slum? Scrap the plans and start again

The best idea to redevelop Dharavi slum? Scrap the plans and start again | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Dharavi stands on a goldmine: a slice of prime land in the heart of India’s richest city. Sharkish developers are circling, but a new competition to invite better ways forward has thrown up fascinating proposals
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China Is Building A Huge Eco-City Where No One Will Need To Drive

China Is Building A Huge Eco-City Where No One Will Need To Drive | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

Outside Chengdu, in central China, a 78 million square foot site has been determined for an unconventional sort of construction project. It will be a city built from scratch, for 80,000 people, none of whom will need a car to get around.The "Great City" is a plan for an ambitious urban center designed to limit its residents environmental impact by producing clean energy, reducing waste, and promoting public transportation over individual car use.





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Alexandra Piggott's insight:

What about Dongtan - have we been here before?

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First taste of chocolate

"To be honest I do not know what they make of my beans," says farmer N'Da Alphonse. "I've heard they're used as flavoring in cooking, but I've never seen it. I do not even know if it's true." Watch how the Dutch respond to a cocoa bean in return or you can watch our entire episode on chocolate here.


Via Seth Dixon
Alexandra Piggott's insight:

 This video is really amazing - we tend to forget the delight that comes from experiencing something new. Although chocloate production does have a dark side this video offers a different perspective.

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Kendra King's curator insight, March 15, 6:30 PM

This is a reminder of how well off the past colonizers really are in comparison to the once colonized lands. When describing the chocolate some of the African workers called it “a precious gift” and a “privilege to taste.” Yet even I, a huge chocoholic, think both of those descriptions are extreme. My reaction to this stems solely from that fact that I am lucky enough to have what I think is a simple commodity in the United States. Really, the descriptions from the farmers probably isn’t that far off since they never ate it before. Hearing their reactions though was just a bit it is actually a bit sad. They handle a part of the produce every day, but never knew what it was like. Now that the farmers know it is going to be bitter sweet as well. On the one hand, they had the pleasure of knowing. However, they probably won’t have an opportunity to eat the chocolate ever again give how expensive and rare it is in their country. I wonder of many years from now, the Ivory Coast will ever be able to raise the standard of living within the country enough so that chocolate will one day be seen as common place? 

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 9:24 AM

It is inconceivable that these farmers did not know what the end product was. A little suspicious of the lack of knowledge given the relative ease of access to the internet. the point is still valid as the real factor here is the inputs of labor being so inexpensive. In class last week, we learned that Africa is by far the youngest continent in the world and thus is ripe for exploitation of young and plentiful labor. Seems Africa can't win when it comes to slavery; from the exportation of slaves to the Americas and Europe in the late 1700's to mid 1800's to colonization efforts by Britain and other nations they can't catch a break. I love my chocolate and will not stop purchasing it. That is not the issue. The issue is slave labor and corrupt governments that support this problem. The Ivory Coast is aptly named; white supremacy at it's core....

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 4:06 PM

unit 6 key concepts development, poverty, globalization, industry, labor

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An Intriguingly Detailed Animation of How People Move Around a City

An Intriguingly Detailed Animation of How People Move Around a City | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Watch the commuting patterns of New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles.

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, July 13, 2014 10:41 AM

You can actually plug-in income levels for these 3 cities and view daily commutes.  Fascinating CityLab data!

 

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, July 13, 2014 6:28 PM
Another fabulous post for Year 7 via Seth Dixon. An aspect of liveability in colour!
MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:03 PM

APHG-U7

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▶ India's urban future - YouTube

Our Live Charts offer food for thought on topics from military spending to millennials to football
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The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.

 

By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.


Via Seth Dixon
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Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 2014 4:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2014 5:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:03 PM

APHG-U2 & U6

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Quotes on Urban environments


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oyndrila's curator insight, March 13, 2014 11:53 AM

I found this collection of quotes meaningful to introduce as well as reflect on topics on urban environments.

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The Case for Cul-de-Sacs

The Case for Cul-de-Sacs | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
People who live in them actually have greater social cohesion, according to one sociologist.

 

Thomas R. Hochschild Jr. actually first encountered the social cohesion of cul-de-sacs in his latest research when he wandered into one in Connecticut with his clipboard and polo shirt, and someone called the cops.  That never happened on the other types of streets he was studying, places where it would turn out the neighbors didn't know each other as well, and it was less clear who "belonged." Repeatedly, though, he found at the end of cul-de-sacs families who watched each others' children and took in each others' mail, who barbequed and orchestrated the removal of snow together, and who considered each other close friends. In cul-de-sacs, these families had a stronger sense of shared social space and territoriality. An outsider stood out.


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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 23, 2014 8:33 PM

Living in a cul-de-sac sounds very inviting.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 24, 2014 1:32 PM

I lived in a col-de-sac for a number of years. My family and I had very close relationships with our two neighbors within our col-de-sac. We had parties together and helped each other out in times of need - this article is spot on.  

Matt Richardson's curator insight, February 25, 2014 10:13 AM

Interesting article about suburban design.

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The London Array

The London Array | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

Twenty kilometers (12 miles) from England’s Kent and Essex coasts, the world’s largest offshore wind farm has started harvesting the breezes over the sea. Located in the Thames Estuary, where the River Thames meets the North Sea, the London Array has a maximum generating power of 630 megawatts (MW), enough to supply as many as 500,000 homes.

The wind farm became fully operational on April 8, 2013. Twenty days later, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite captured this image of the area. The second image is a closeup of the area marked by the white box in the top image. White points in the second image are the wind turbines; a few boat wakes are also visible. The sea is discolored by light tan sediment—spring runoff washed out by the Thames.


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Albert Jordan's curator insight, January 29, 2014 8:16 PM

England is in a peculiar situation due to their geographic location limiting their ability to expand outward and collect homegrown resources. As the first world nations push towards a “greener” and more sustainable energy producing ability, the effects of trying to help the Earth, both positive and negative need to be taken into effect. As some opponents to the wind farm have brought up, it can negatively affect the bird species in the area. What matters most? England’s attempt to wean themselves off of unsustainable resource dependence in order to enhance the future generations may be seen as a positive but with every action, there is a reaction.

 The issue that comes up as we humans try to better our relationship with the Earth in an effort not to destroy our home, paired with our lust for a healthy and non-apocalyptic future that we can still absorb ourselves into social media – do we negatively impact local animal species for our greater cause or do we limit our footprint even if it takes a viable option for the enhancement of our own resource dependence off the table. I guess if the long term effect on the birds and the resulting issues of their no longer presence was fully and responsibly researched and the pros and cons were compared to each other, then time will tell if the wind farm does more harm or good.

Shiva Prakash's curator insight, February 3, 2014 11:21 PM

Technology is changing the shopping habits of buyers. Compete recently conducted a survey that reported a rapid increase in the number of people using their mobile devices for shopping Online shopping which u can buy from home easily with lots of designs of cloths and new technology mobile phones without going out for shopping just click here to go eaZy http://shopdeer.blogspot.in/

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 3:08 PM

It is very nice to see alternative forms of energy being explored. The conscious effort to cut carbon emissions is a benefit for the entire planet.

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The Circular Economy

Ellen takes us on a journey to investigates how insights from living systems might offer some of the answers to how we can re-design our future, in a world of increasing finite materials and energy.

Find out more about the circular economy at  http://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org

Follow the Ellen MacArthur Foundation on Twitter:  http://www.twitter.com/made2bmadeagain


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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, November 13, 2013 6:06 PM

The focus here is on 100% recycling. Because it is not enough to merely use a little less and cause a little less harm.  We need to close the loop by elimimating what we call "waste" and reducing our harm all the way down to 0.

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What the experts say: how to make our cities more sustainable

What the experts say: how to make our cities more sustainable | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Catch-up on the highlights from our recent panel discussion on sustainable cities, including why it is a myth that Spaniards don’t cycle

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The 9 Worst-Designed Cities in the World

The 9 Worst-Designed Cities in the World | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"To get to the bottom of what qualifies as 'badly designed,' we picked the brains of several urban planners to highlight the flaws of some of the world's biggest cities. In the end, that birthed a list of nine cities that, for various reasons, are gigantic messes in some way or another."

 

On the list: Jakarta, Dubai, Atlanta, Naypyidaw, São Paulo, Boston, Brasilia, Missoula and Dhaka. 

 

Tags: urban, planning, urbanism.


Via Seth Dixon
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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 5:46 AM

Reading about these different cities makes me cringe. Either the rich is priority, politicians are priority, or traffic is insane to the point going to the grocery store for milk will cost you two hours in traffic.

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 10:12 AM

Reflection of development. Sometimes commercialization in less developed or developing countries causes issues due to lack of finances when trying to industrialize the region. This poses problems such as the ones described in the article. 

christian's curator insight, May 27, 12:01 PM

Unit 6: urban land use 

This article is mainly about how bad some of the worlds urban areas are. The article shows and explains why they are bad and also why they were even designed in the way that they were. One example is Brasilia, which, was designed to have a population of 500,000, instead it has a population of about 3 million.

This article ties into unit 6 by showing some of the worst urban areas throughout the world. And also why they were even designed to be a CBD.

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Comparing four world cities – London, Delhi, Tokyo and Bogota

Comparing four world cities – London, Delhi, Tokyo and Bogota | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
These four cities - home to a total of more than 80 million people - respond to economic, political and environmental shifts in radically different ways. LSE Cities crunches the data on growth, transport and density

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oyndrila's curator insight, February 12, 11:54 AM

An excellent resource to discuss urban environments.

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Could this favela be the blueprint for how our cities should look by 2050?

Could this favela be the blueprint for how our cities should look by 2050? | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Mediaeval towns and Brazilian favelas could hold the secrets to better urban living and should be studied by architects and planners designing Britain’s new green cities, according to a leading environmental scientist.

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Residents of informal settlements of Ulaanbataar are reluctant to move to formal housing.

Residents of informal settlements of Ulaanbataar are reluctant to move to formal housing. | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Though Ulaanbaatar’s sprawling informal ‘ger district’ lacks access to drinking water and sewerage, officials may struggle to coax residents to swap canvas for bricks and mortar

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Alexandra Piggott's insight:

A great case study of the impact of globalisation and the drive to development alongside traditional cultural norms.

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oyndrila's curator insight, September 3, 2014 10:44 AM

An interesting article that examines the struggle between tradition and modernity among rural-urban migrants of Mongolia.

CT Blake's curator insight, September 7, 2014 5:19 PM

Yurts!!!

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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 2, 2014 12:32 AM

Perception!

Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 2014 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

Via Seth Dixon
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Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 2014 12:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 2014 9:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 7:47 PM

APHG-U6

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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."


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steve smith's curator insight, June 7, 2014 9:01 PM

A great look at urbanisation. 

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 2014 9:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


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Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 2014 10:23 PM

Unit VII

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:40 AM

unit 7

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:48 PM

The majority of megacities are in the developing world, with the exception of places like New York and Tokyo, best showing how the face of the world is changing. Developing countries are on their paths to becoming major powers, such as Calkutta for example. As an enlarging city, more and more citizens are flocking to the abundance of jobs in the city which thus increases India's development as a result of the growing city and thus leads to a cycle of growth as demand for more jobs increases as the city grows. Megacities are thus a symbol of the developing world and can be used in human geography as symbols of development. 

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Population concentration growing in Tokyo region: report

Population concentration growing in Tokyo region: report | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
The number of people who moved into the Tokyo metropolitan region exceeded the number moving out by 96,524 in 2013, up more than 29,000 from the previous year, a government ...

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The 10 Cities That Are Leading The Way In Urban Sustainability

The 10 Cities That Are Leading The Way In Urban Sustainability | IB Geography Urban Studies PEMBROKE | Scoop.it
Cities are the laboratories where the most innovative ideas for surviving in the future can be tested. These 10--from New York to Tokyo to Bogota...

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oyndrila's curator insight, September 8, 2013 5:41 AM

Inspiring information on innovative techniques implemented by cities around the world to be sustainable.The cities featured here belong to the developing and the developed world. So, more cities in the developing world must work towards being sustainable.