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How Is A 1,600-Year-Old Tree Weathering California's Drought?

How Is A 1,600-Year-Old Tree Weathering California's Drought? | Tree News | Scoop.it
Four years of too little water is killing millions of trees in the Sierra, yet some giant sequoias still thrive. Tree-climbing scientists are exploring sequoias branch by branch to find their secret.

Via Douglas Shaw
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Hemlock Extinction Looms over Tennessee Forests | Extinction Countdown

Hemlock Extinction Looms over Tennessee Forests | Extinction Countdown | Tree News | Scoop.it
Hemlock trees in particular have been hard hit by an invasive bug called the Hemlock woolly adelgid. Wherever the bugs go, hemlocks die. In some places entire forests have been devastated..

Via Garry Rogers
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Neighborhood greenspace and health in a large urban center : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group

Neighborhood greenspace and health in a large urban center : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group | Tree News | Scoop.it
Studies have shown that natural environments can enhance health and here we build upon that work by examining the associations between comprehensive greenspace metrics and health. We focused on a large urban population center (Toronto, Canada) and related the two domains by combining high-resolution satellite imagery and individual tree data from Toronto with questionnaire-based self-reports of general health perception, cardio-metabolic conditions and mental illnesses from the Ontario Health Study. Results from multiple regressions and multivariate canonical correlation analyses suggest that people who live in neighborhoods with a higher density of trees on their streets report significantly higher health perception and significantly less cardio-metabolic conditions (controlling for socio-economic and demographic factors). We find that having 10 more trees in a city block, on average, improves health perception in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $10,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $10,000 higher median income or being 7 years younger. We also find that having 11 more trees in a city block, on average, decreases cardio-metabolic conditions in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $20,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $20,000 higher median income or being 1.4 years younger.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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How trees talk to each other

How trees talk to each other | Tree News | Scoop.it
"A forest is much more than what you see," says ecologist Suzanne Simard. Her 30 years of research in Canadian forests have led to an astounding discovery -- trees talk, often and over vast distances.
Via Alexis Brantes, Luciana Viter, Online Marketing
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Ginger Jewell's curator insight, September 11, 9:21 AM
This is so interesting.
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ISA Names Eight Arborists 2016 True Professionals of Arboriculture™

ISA Names Eight Arborists 2016 True Professionals of Arboriculture™ | Tree News | Scoop.it
Tree experts recognized by the International Society of Arboriculture for increasing visibility of the profession and promoting the importance of the urban forest worldwide
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AIB Presents - Tending Our Trees

A Spanish proverb says: "It will beggar a doctor to live where orchards thrive." Perhaps that is because research shows that surrounding ones self wit
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Research Shows Trees in Bioswales Provide Significant Stormwater Benefits | DeepRoot Blog

Research Shows Trees in Bioswales Provide Significant Stormwater Benefits | DeepRoot Blog | Tree News | Scoop.it
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NY’s Clever New Park Will Weather Epic Storms and Rising Seas

NY’s Clever New Park Will Weather Epic Storms and Rising Seas | Tree News | Scoop.it
Governors Island's new park as a model for a city preparing for climate change
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Tree care workshop

Tree care workshop | Tree News | Scoop.it
The South Texas Tree Council and local city foresters are holding a Tree Care Workshop and Urban Forestry Seminar on Wednesday, July 27, at the Library Media Center at the
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Austin trees – there’s an app for that - July 6 2016 —AUSTIN Texas— For the first time ever a census for trees is available in a new easy-to-use application developed by Texas A&M Forest Service. T...

Austin trees – there’s an app for that - July 6 2016 —AUSTIN Texas— For the first time ever a census for trees is available in a new easy-to-use application developed by Texas A&M Forest Service. T... | Tree News | Scoop.it
July 6, 2016 —AUSTIN, Texas— For the first time ever, a census for trees is available in a new, easy-to-use application developed by Texas A&M Forest Service. The Urban Forest Inventory and Analysis of trees in Austin, Texas, is presented graphically in  My City’s Trees . My City’s Trees  enables civic leaders, community planners, elected officials and anyone with access to the Internet, to learn about Austin’s urban forest, and explore Urban FIA data by land cover, city growth, watershed
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Older Trees Grow Faster, Take Up More Carbon

Older Trees Grow Faster, Take Up More Carbon | Tree News | Scoop.it
Trees' growth accelerates with age, according to a new study in the journal Nature, which suggests that the world's oldest trees could play an important role in combating climate change.
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In the 1960s, forester helped fight off Dutch elm disease, and 'trees were just a part of his life'

In the 1960s, forester helped fight off Dutch elm disease, and 'trees were just a part of his life' | Tree News | Scoop.it
Orville Hatcher, a forester for Omaha from 1958 to 1990, died June 27 from heart failure at an assisted living center in Omaha, his wife Beverly Ann Hatcher said. He was 91.
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Can Hungry Goats Restore Urban Forests?

Can Hungry Goats Restore Urban Forests? | Tree News | Scoop.it
Over the last few years, this area of the park, known as the Vale of Cashmere, was battered by a spate of storms. When Hurricane Sandy tore through the New York area in the fall of 2012, the wind and rain pummeled grasses and shrubs. The storm splintered branches from tree trunks and yanked plants up by their roots; 50 mature trees were destroyed in this area alone. The park is still trying to recover. A nearby play area was constructed from the trunks and branches of the felled trees; they comprise the sides of a sandbox and a literal treehouse. But the trees' absence has been acutely felt—not least in the form of invasive species that have since proliferated. Park officials are hoping that goats—and, especially, their seemingly bottomless, multi-chambered stomachs—might offer a solution.

Via Mário Carmo
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The Chemicals Behind the Colours of Autumn Leaves

The Chemicals Behind the Colours of Autumn Leaves | Tree News | Scoop.it
With autumn looming on the horizon, the leaves on some trees have already begun the transition towards the vibrant hues of autumn..

Via Bonnie Hohhof
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Here Are the Trees That Will Start to Vanish Because of Climate Change

Here Are the Trees That Will Start to Vanish Because of Climate Change | Tree News | Scoop.it
The natural world is changing in significant ways thanks to human-caused climate change. While some species are flourishing, others are already gone forever. Now scientists are looking specifically at how US forests will transform due to the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide.

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Do Trees Sleep at Night? LiveScience

Do Trees Sleep at Night? LiveScience | Tree News | Scoop.it

"After a long a long day of photosynthesizing, do trees fall asleep? It depends on how you define "sleep," but trees do relax their branches at night, which might be a sign of snoozing, scientists said. In the only reported study to look at tree siestas, researchers set up lasers that measured the movements of two silver birch trees (Betula pendula) at night. 



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Under attack: Invasive species wiping out Pennsylvania state tree

Under attack: Invasive species wiping out Pennsylvania state tree | Tree News | Scoop.it
Breaking sports news, national sports news from The Citizens Voice and citizensvoice.com covering all of Luzerne County from local leagues to high schools to the pros.
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The Earth Has Lungs. Watch Them Breathe.

The Earth Has Lungs. Watch Them Breathe. | Tree News | Scoop.it
There are more trees on Earth than there are stars in the Milky Way, and what they do for the planet is amazing.
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These Guys Are On a Mission To Understand Our Urban Forests

These Guys Are On a Mission To Understand Our Urban Forests | Tree News | Scoop.it
The U.S. Forest Service inventories the types and condition of trees all across the country. And now, the agency is expanding that effort to better understand our urban forests.
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Leaf mysteries revealed through the computer's eye

Leaf mysteries revealed through the computer's eye | Tree News | Scoop.it
A computer program that learns and can categorize leaves into large evolutionary categories such as plant families will lead to greatly improved fossil identification and a better understanding of flowering plant evolution, according to an international team of researchers.
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Trees and Shrubs—Pruning and Mulching | Mississippi State University Extension Service

Trees and Shrubs—Pruning and Mulching | Mississippi State University Extension Service | Tree News | Scoop.it
This is not the best time to plant trees and shrubs. Heat and periods of drought in summer can take their toll on late-planted trees and shrubs. Save your money and wait until late fall and winter to plant.
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Mayor Lauds City’s Gains Over Tree-Trimming Backlog

Mayor Lauds City’s Gains Over Tree-Trimming Backlog | Tree News | Scoop.it
Amid public outcry over police oversight, rising crime and uncertainty surrounding the cash-strapped Chicago Public Schools, Mayor Rahm Emanuel had some good news for city residents on Thursday.
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California Drought Causing Trees to Die by the 'Millions,' Scientist Says

California Drought Causing Trees to Die by the 'Millions,' Scientist Says | Tree News | Scoop.it
iStock/Thinkstock(PASADENA, Calif.) -- The devastation the California drought has caused to conifer trees in the Sierra Nevadas over the last couple of years "is far greater than previously observed," NASA scientists said in announcement of the publication of new map of the region.
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MORE FOREST PESTS THAN EVER ARE ENTERING THE U.S., AND IT’S COSTING THE PUBLIC A FORTUNE

MORE FOREST PESTS THAN EVER ARE ENTERING THE U.S., AND IT’S COSTING THE PUBLIC A FORTUNE | Tree News | Scoop.it

In the 20th century, chestnut blight and Dutch elm disease decimated billions of U.S. trees, in forests and along urban and suburban streets. The tree diseases, caused by invasive pests, effectively changed the face of one American city landscape after another—chestnut trees were virtually wiped out and elms diminished to but a few locations—and cost local governments and homeowners a fortune.

 

A paper published May 10 in the journal Ecological Applications illustrates how American homeowners today bear the brunt of the burden posed by current invasive forest pests. The emerald ash borer, hemlock woolly adelgid and others are costing Americans well over $2 billion dollars a year. Gary Lovett, a forest ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, based in Millbrook, New York, was inspired to pursue the study after realizing that in his field work he was coming across more and more hemlock and other Eastern U.S. trees that were dead or destroyed by forest pests.
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Lovett calls forest pests, present in all 50 states, the most pressing and underappreciated forest health issue today. Working with 15 other scientists to synthesize information found in previous scientific studies of invasive pests, Lovett found that, on average, 25 new pests become established in the country every decade. The scientists say efforts that exist to prevent new forest pests from entering the country are far too weak to keep up with escalating trade and an increased reliance on shipping containers—25 million enter the U.S. each year.

 

More than 90 percent of wood boring insects that have recently invaded the U.S. entered on wood packaging materials, mostly within shipping containers. And while the federal government does require that wood packaging material be treated to prevent pest importation and that plants are inspected upon entry to the U.S., there are simply too many shipments coming in each day to inspect everything.
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Lovett says we've been lucky not to have yet encountered an imported pest destructive to the Southeast’s loblolly pine or the Northwest’s Douglas fir, two of the country’s most commercially important trees. He estimates the economic damages would then be far greater than they already are.

 

However, the stakes are already higher than most people realize. Forest pests are the only threat that can decimate an entire tree species within just decades, as they did the American elm and chestnut.


Via Sam Radcliffe
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